Publications by authors named "Nicole S Stefanko"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Consensus recommendations for the use of retinoids in ichthyosis and other disorders of cornification in children and adolescents.

Pediatr Dermatol 2021 Jan 10;38(1):164-180. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

Departments of Dermatology and Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Topical and systemic retinoids have long been used in the treatment of ichthyoses and other disorders of cornification. Due to the need for long-term use of retinoids for these disorders, often beginning in childhood, numerous clinical concerns must be considered. Systemic retinoids have known side effects involving bone and eye. Additionally, potential psychiatric and cardiovascular effects need to be considered. Contraceptive concerns, as well as the additive cardiovascular and bone effects of systemic retinoid use with hormonal contraception must also be deliberated for patients of childbearing potential. The Pediatric Dermatology Research Alliance (PeDRA) Use of Retinoids in Ichthyosis Work Group was formed to address these issues and to establish best practices regarding the use of retinoids in ichthyoses based on available evidence and expert opinion.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.14408DOI Listing
January 2021

Evaluating the Safety of Oral Propranolol Therapy in Patients With PHACE Syndrome.

JAMA Dermatol 2020 02;156(2):186-190

Department of Dermatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Importance: Oral propranolol is widely considered to be first-line therapy for complicated infantile hemangioma, but its use in patients with PHACE (posterior fossa malformations, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies) syndrome has been debated owing to concerns that the cardiovascular effects of the drug may increase the risk for arterial ischemic stroke.

Objective: To assess the incidence of adverse events among patients with PHACE syndrome receiving oral propranolol for infantile hemangioma.

Design, Setting, And Participants: This multicenter retrospective cohort study assessed the incidence of adverse events among 76 patients with PHACE syndrome receiving oral propranolol for infantile hemangioma at 11 tertiary care, academic pediatric dermatology practices. Medical records from January 1, 2010, through April 25, 2017, were reviewed.

Exposures: Patients received oral propranolol, 0.3 mg/kg/dose or more.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The main outcome was the rate and severity of adverse events occurring throughout the course of treatment with oral propranolol, as documented in the medical records. Adverse events were graded from 1 to 5 using a scale derived from the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and were considered to be serious if they were grade 3 or higher.

Results: A total of 76 patients (59 girls and 17 boys; median age at propranolol initiation, 56 days [range, 0-396 days]) met the inclusion criteria. There were no reports of serious adverse events (ie, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or cardiovascular events) during treatment with oral propranolol. A total of 46 nonserious adverse events were reported among 29 patients (38.2%); the most commonly reported nonserious adverse events were sleep disturbances and minor gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract symptoms. In a comparison with 726 infants who received oral propranolol for hemangioma but did not meet criteria for PHACE syndrome, there was no significant difference in the rate of serious adverse events experienced during treatment (0 of 76 patients with PHACE syndrome and 3 of 726 patients without PHACE syndrome [0.4%]).

Conclusions And Relevance: This study found that oral propranolol was used to treat infantile hemangioma in 76 patients with PHACE syndrome and that no serious adverse events were experienced. These data provide support for the safety of oral propranolol in this patient population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2019.3839DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6990697PMC
February 2020

Hamartomas and midline anomalies in association with infantile hemangiomas, PHACE, and LUMBAR syndromes.

Pediatr Dermatol 2020 Jan 20;37(1):78-85. Epub 2019 Oct 20.

Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Background/objective: The pathogenesis of infantile hemangiomas (IH), PHACE, and LUMBAR syndromes remains unknown. We aim to describe histopathologic features of midline anomalies associated with IH, including patients with PHACE and LUMBAR syndromes.

Methods: A multicenter retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients with IH, PHACE, and LUMBAR syndrome with histopathologic specimens from sternal or midline anomalies. A total of 18 midline lesions from 13 patients were included. Out of 18, 14 midline lesions underwent both histopathologic and clinical review. Three hamartoma-like chin plaques and one supraumbilical raphe underwent only clinical review.

Results: All 13 patients had midline lesions and IH. Histopathologic diagnoses were as follows: rhabdomyomatous mesenchymal hamartoma (3), folliculosebaceous cystic hamartoma (1), fibroepithelial polyp (1), verrucous epidermal hyperplasia with vascular proliferation and fibroplasia (1), congenital midline cervical cleft (1), pericardium with fibrosis (1), fibrous components with increased collagen (1), atrophic skin/membrane (3), angiolipomatous mass with neural components (1), and lipomatous mass (1). Due to the retrospective nature of this study, it was not possible to obtain pathology slides for all midline lesions that had previously been biopsied or resected. We show clinically and histopathologically a new association between PHACE syndrome and rhabdomyomatous mesenchymal hamartoma (RMH), in addition to demonstrating the association between PHACE syndrome and chin hamartomas. We also display histopathologic findings seen in midline lesions resected from LUMBAR patients.

Conclusion: Rhabdomyomatous mesenchymal hamartoma is thought to be related to aberrations of mesenchymal cells during development; therefore, this may provide clues to the pathogenesis of IH and related syndromes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.14006DOI Listing
January 2020

Natural history of PHACE syndrome: A survey of adults with PHACE.

Pediatr Dermatol 2019 Sep 20;36(5):618-622. Epub 2019 Jun 20.

Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Background: Awareness of PHACE syndrome has increased; however, little information exists regarding its natural history, especially in patients over the age of 18. We aim to describe the natural history of PHACE to enhance clinical management and counseling of patients.

Methods: A cohort of patients ≥ 18 years was identified through the PHACE Syndrome Registry and a Vascular Anomalies Clinic Database. A cross-sectional survey was designed after a review of the literature by PHACE experts (IF, JP, DS). Questions were selected by consensus, and the survey was conducted using the Qualtrics platform and via in-person interviews. A 75% response rate was found.

Results: Eighteen adults-17 females and one transgender male-completed the survey. Respondents ranged in age from 18 to 59, with 24 being the mean age. Eighty-nine percent reported experiencing headaches, and 17% reported experiencing acute but transient symptoms mimicking acute ischemic stroke, later diagnosed as atypical migraines. Thirty-three percent reported hearing loss, and 67% endorsed dental issues. One patient experienced two arterial dissections. Three-fourths who attempted conception were successful, and none of their children had clinical features of PHACE. Because results were based on a retrospective survey, data captured were prone to recall bias and not objective. Results were limited by a small sample size.

Conclusions: Health care providers should be aware of a possible increased risk of neurovascular complications, including atypical migraines mimicking transient ischemic attacks and arterial dissection, in adults with PHACE. Heritability has not been demonstrated, and future studies are needed to assess the risk of infertility.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.13871DOI Listing
September 2019

Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn and associated hypercalcemia: A systematic review of the literature.

Pediatr Dermatol 2019 Jan 6;36(1):24-30. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Dermatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.

Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn is an uncommon disorder, and although usually benign, associated hypercalcemia can lead to complications such as failure to thrive and renal failure. Many sources suggest screening for hypercalcemia for 6 months following resolution of skin lesions, but little data are available to support this recommendation. This study examines existing published literature to better guide practitioners regarding screening evaluations of asymptomatic patients with subcutaneous fat necrosis. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using a PubMed English literature search. Data from case reports and case series were collected regarding the presence of hypercalcemia and associated complications, birth history, and age of onset/resolution of skin lesions and laboratory abnormalities. Approximately half (51%) of infants reported had hypercalcemia. Most (77%) developed detectable hypercalcemia within 30 days of skin lesion onset, and 95% developed detectable hypercalcemia within 60 days of skin lesion onset. Hypercalcemia was detected in only 4% of patients > 70 days following onset of skin lesions. Seventy-six percent had resolution of hypercalcemia within 4 weeks of detection. Hypercalcemia was more prevalent in full-term vs pre-term infants (P-value = 0.054), and higher birthweight was significantly associated with an increased risk of developing hypercalcemia (P-value = 0.022). Although gestational age trended toward significance, the only statistically significant clinical feature predicting the development of hypercalcemia was higher birthweight. Current recommendations for laboratory monitoring are not evidence-based, and this study provides interim data to guide practitioners until prospective, randomized controlled trials are conducted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.13640DOI Listing
January 2019