Publications by authors named "Nicole Hanson"

13 Publications

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Alternative Protein and Iron Sources from Edible Insects but Not Improved Body Composition and Iron Status in Malnourished Rats.

Nutrients 2019 Oct 16;11(10). Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University, 2302 Osborn Dr, 220 Mackay, Ames, IA 50011, USA.

(STO) and edible insects are potential dietary approaches to prevent malnutrition. Hence, we determined the effect of STO and insect powders on improving nutritional status in malnourished rats. Malnutrition was induced in rats by feeding 5% protein, ~2 ppm Fe (LPI) diet for 21 days. During the 14 day repletion, five groups of rats ( = 8) were fed diets supplemented with (cricket, ADO), (palm weevil larvae, RFA), STO, ADO + STO (TAD), and casein + ferrous sulfate (PIS, positive control), as well as a non-supplemented group (negative control, LPI). A normal (NOM) group was fed protein-Fe sufficient (PIS) diet throughout the study. Body composition was measured by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The hemoglobin (Hb) repletion method was used to assess relative biological value (RBV, compared to PIS) of the supplemented groups. No differences were found in weight gain, bone mineral content, lean and fat mass, and organ weights among the edible insects and PIS groups, but these results differed from STO and the LPI groups. An increase in Hb Fe and RBV with ADO and RFA was comparable to PIS. ADO and RFA could be excellent sources of protein and bioavailable Fe, making it a sustainable, low-cost food source to prevent malnutrition in humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu11102481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6835807PMC
October 2019

TGF-β-Induced Quiescence Mediates Chemoresistance of Tumor-Propagating Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Cell Stem Cell 2017 Nov;21(5):650-664.e8

The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. Electronic address:

Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) are heterogeneous tumors sustained by tumor-propagating cancer cells (TPCs). SCCs frequently resist chemotherapy through still unknown mechanisms. Here, we combine H2B-GFP-based pulse-chasing with cell-surface markers to distinguish quiescent from proliferative TPCs within SCCs. We find that quiescent TPCs resist DNA damage and exhibit increased tumorigenic potential in response to chemotherapy, whereas proliferative TPCs undergo apoptosis. Quiescence is regulated by TGF-β/SMAD signaling, which directly regulates cell-cycle gene transcription to control a reversible G1 cell-cycle arrest, independent of p21 function. Indeed, genetic or pharmacological TGF-β inhibition increases the susceptibility of TPCs to chemotherapy because it prevents entry into a quiescent state. These findings provide direct evidence that TPCs can reversibly enter a quiescent, chemoresistant state and thereby underscore the need for combinatorial approaches to improve treatment of chemotherapy-resistant SCCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2017.10.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5778452PMC
November 2017

Infantile Hemangioma Originates From A Dysregulated But Not Fully Transformed Multipotent Stem Cell.

Sci Rep 2016 10 27;6:35811. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue New York, NY 10016, USA.

Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common tumor of infancy. Its cellular origin and biological signals for uncontrolled growth are poorly understood, and specific pharmacological treatment is unavailable. To understand the process of hemangioma-genesis we characterized the progenitor hemangioma-derived stem cell (HemSC) and its lineage and non-lineage derivatives. For this purpose we performed a high-throughput (HT) phenotypic and gene expression analysis of HemSCs, and analyzed HemSC-derived tumorspheres. We found that IH is characterized by high expression of genes involved in vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis and associated signaling pathways. These results show that IH derives from a dysregulated stem cell that remains in an immature, arrested stage of development. The potential biomarkers we identified can afford the development of diagnostic tools and precision-medicine therapies to "rewire" or redirect cellular transitions at an early stage, such as signaling pathways or immune response modifiers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep35811DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5081534PMC
October 2016

Protein Expression Analysis of Melanocyte Differentiation Antigen TRP-2.

Am J Dermatopathol 2016 Mar;38(3):201-7

*Department of Immunology, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; †Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; ‡Division of Hematology/Oncology, Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY; and §Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.

Melanocyte differentiation antigens, such as gp100, tyrosinase, and Melan-A and their corresponding antibodies HMB45, T311, and A103, are major diagnostic tools in surgical pathology. Little is known about tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2, or dopachrome tautomerase/DCT) another melanocyte differentiation antigen, which is an enzymatic component of melanogenesis. We identified a commercial reagent to TRP-2, monoclonal antibody (mAb) C-9 and undertook a comprehensive analysis to assess its specificity and usefulness for surgical pathology. Subsequently, we analyzed panels of normal tissues and tumors. We show that TRP-2 is regularly expressed in melanocytes of the normal skin. In cutaneous nevi, TRP-2 is present in junctional as well as in dermal nevocytes. In malignant tumors, C-9 reactivity is restricted to melanocytic and related lesions and present in 84% and 58% of primary and metastatic melanomas, respectively. Ten primary melanomas of the anorectal mucosa were all positive. Like the other melanocyte differentiation antigens, TRP-2 was absent in 6 desmoplastic melanomas. Also, only 2 of 9 angiomyolipomas were TRP-2 positive. We conclude that mAb C-9 is a valuable reagent for the analysis of TRP-2 expression in archival surgical pathology material. The expression pattern of TRP-2 in melanocytic and related lesions appears to parallel other melanocyte differentiation antigens, although the overall incidence is lower than other antigens, such as Melan-A or gp100.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DAD.0000000000000362DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5844230PMC
March 2016

Cancer/testis antigens expression and autologous serological response in a set of Brazilian non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients.

Cancer Immunol Immunother 2012 Dec 26;61(12):2207-14. Epub 2012 May 26.

Departamento de Oncologia Clinica e Experimental, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Botucatu, 740, 3° andar, Hematologia, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo, SP, 04023-900, Brazil.

Background: Based on their tumor-associated expression pattern, cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are considered potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. We aim to evaluate the expression of CTAs in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) samples and the ability of these patients to elicit spontaneous humoral immune response against CTAs.

Methods: Expression of MAGE-A family, CT7/MAGE-C1, CT10/MAGE-C2, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray generated from 106 NHL archival cases. The humoral response against 19 CTAs was tested in 97 untreated NHL serum samples using ELISA technique.

Results: 11.3 % of NHL tumor samples expressed at least 1 CTA. MAGE-A family (6.6 %), GAGE (5.7 %) and NY-ESO-1(4.7 %) were the most frequently expressed antigens. We found no statistically significant correlation between CTA positivity and clinical parameters such as NHL histological subtype, Ann Arbor stage, international prognostic index score, response to treatment and overall survival. Humoral response against at least 1 CTA was observed in 16.5 % of NHL serum samples. However, overall seroreactivity was low, and strong titers (>1:1000) were observed in only two diffuse large B-cell lymphomas patients against CT45.

Conclusion: Our findings are in agreement with most of published studies in this field to date and suggest an overall low expression of CTAs in NHL patients. However, as many new CTAs have been described recently and some of them are found to be highly expressed in NHL cell lines and tumor samples, further studies exploring the expression of different panels of CTAs are needed to evaluate their role as candidates for immunotherapy in NHL patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00262-012-1285-6DOI Listing
December 2012

Case studies of the spatial heterogeneity of DNA viruses in the cystic fibrosis lung.

Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2012 Feb 6;46(2):127-31. Epub 2011 Oct 6.

Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia.

Microbial communities in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been shown to be spatially heterogeneous. Viral communities may also vary spatially, leading to localized viral populations and infections. Here, we characterized viral communities from multiple areas of the lungs of two patients with late-stage CF using metagenomics, that is, the explanted lungs from a transplant patient and lungs acquired postmortem. All regions harbored eukaryotic viruses that may infect the human host, notably herpesviruses, anelloviruses, and papillomaviruses. In the highly diseased apical lobes of explant lungs, viral diversity was extremely low, and only eukaryotic viruses were present. The absence of phage suggests that CF-associated microbial biofilms may escape top-down controls by phage predation. The phages present in other lobes of explant lungs and in all lobes of postmortem lungs comprised distinct communities, and encoded genes for clinically important microbial phenotypes, including small colony variants and antibiotic resistance. Based on the these observations, we postulate that viral communities in CF lungs are spatially distinct and contribute to CF pathology by augmenting the metabolic potential of resident microbes, as well as by directly damaging lung tissue via carcinomas and herpesviral outbreaks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2011-0253OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3361360PMC
February 2012

An overview of cancer/testis antigens expression in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) identifies MAGE-A family and MAGE-C1 as the most frequently expressed antigens in a set of Brazilian cHL patients.

BMC Cancer 2011 Sep 28;11(1):416. Epub 2011 Sep 28.

Departamento de Oncologia Clinica e Experimental, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Botucatu, 740, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo, SP 04023-900, Brazil.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis antigens are considered potential targets for immunotherapy due to their tumor-associated expression pattern. Although recent studies have demonstrated high expression of CT45 in classical Hodgkin's lymphomas (cHL), less is known about the expression pattern of other families of CTAs in cHL. We aim to evaluate the expression of MAGE-A family, MAGE-C1/CT7, MAGE-C2/CT10, NY-ESO1 and GAGE family in cHL and to correlate their expression with clinical and prognostic factors in cHL. METHODS: Tissue microarray was generated from 38 cHL archival cases from Pathology Department of Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was done using the following panel of antibodies: MAGE-A family (MA454, M3H67, 57B and 6C1), GAGE (#26), NY-ESO-1 (E978), MAGE-C1/CT7 (CT7-33) and MAGE-C2/CT10 (CT10#5). RESULTS: We found CTA expression in 21.1% of our cHL series. Among the tested CTAs, only MAGE-A family 7/38 (18.4%) and MAGE-C1/CT7 5/38 (13.2%) were positive in our cHL samples. We found higher CTA positivity in advanced stage (28.6%) compared to early stage (11.8%) disease, but this difference was not statistically significant. Analysis of other clinicopathological subgroups of cHL including histological subtypes, EBV status and response to treatment also did not demonstrate statistical significant differences in CTA expression. CONCLUSION: We found CTA expression in 21.1% of cHL samples using our panel. Our preliminary findings suggest that from all CTAs included in this study, MAGE-A family and MAGE-C1/CT7 are the most interesting ones to be explored in further studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-11-416DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3190392PMC
September 2011

Expression of cancer testis antigens in human BRCA-associated breast cancers: potential targets for immunoprevention?

Cancer Immunol Immunother 2011 Jul 5;60(7):999-1007. Epub 2011 Apr 5.

New York University Cancer Institute, New York University School of Medicine, 462 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA.

Introduction: Novel breast cancer risk-reducing strategies for individuals with germline mutations of the BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes are urgently needed. Identification of antigenic targets that are expressed in early cancers, but absent in normal breast epithelium of these high-risk individuals, could provide the basis for the development of effective immunoprophylactic strategies. Cancer testis (CT) antigens are potential candidates because their expression is restricted to tumors, and accumulating data suggest that they play important roles in cellular proliferation, stem cell function, and carcinogenesis. The objective of this study was to examine the expression of CT antigens and their frequency in BRCA-associated breast cancers.

Methods: Archived breast cancer tissues (n = 26) as well as morphologically normal breast tissues (n = 7) from women carrying deleterious BRCA 1 and/or 2 mutations were obtained for antigen expression analysis by immunohistochemistry. Expression of the following CT antigens was examined: MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, MAGE-A4, MAGE-C1.CT7, NY-ESO-1, MAGE-C2/CT10, and GAGE.

Results: CT antigens were expressed in 16/26 (61.5%, 95% CI 43-80%) of BRCA-associated cancers, including in situ tumors. Thirteen of twenty-six (50%) breast cancers expressed two or more CT antigens; three cancers expressed all seven CT antigens. MAGE-A was expressed in 13/26 (50%) of cancers, NY-ESO-1 was expressed in 10/26 (38%) of tumors. In contrast, none of the CT antigens were expressed in adjacent or contralateral normal breast epithelium (P = 0.003).

Conclusions: We report a high CT antigen expression rate in BRCA-associated breast cancer as well as the lack of expression of these antigens in benign breast tissue of carriers, identifying CT antigens as potential vaccine targets for breast cancer prevention in these high-risk individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00262-011-1005-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3678385PMC
July 2011

Human papillomavirus 16-associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in humans excludes CD8 T cells from dysplastic epithelium.

J Immunol 2010 Dec 29;185(11):7107-14. Epub 2010 Oct 29.

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

High-grade cervical dysplasia caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 is a lesion that should be susceptible to an HPV-specific immune response; disease initiation and persistence is predicated on expression of two viral Ags, E6 and E7. In immune-competent subjects, at least 25% of HPV16(+) high-grade cervical dysplasia lesions undergo complete regression. However, in the peripheral blood, naturally occurring IFN-γ T cell responses to HPV E6 and E7 are weak, requiring ex vivo sensitization to detect, and are not sufficiently sensitive to predict regression. In this study, we present immunologic data directly assessing cervical lymphocytes from this cohort. We found that nearly all cervical tissue T cells express the mucosal homing receptor, α(4)β(7) surface integrin. T cells isolated from dysplastic mucosa were skewed toward a central memory phenotype compared with normal mucosal resident T cells, and dysplastic lesions expressed transcripts for CCL19 and CCL21, raising the possibility that the tissue itself sustains a response that is not detectable in the blood. Moreover, lesion regression in the study window could retrospectively be predicted at study entry by the ability of CD8(+) T cells to gain access to lesional epithelium. Vascular endothelial expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1, the ligand that supports entry of α(4)β(7)(+) T cells into tissues, colocalized tightly with the distribution of CD8 T cells and was not expressed in persistent dysplastic epithelium. These findings suggest that dysregulated expression of vascular adhesion molecules plays a role in immune evasion very early in the course of HPV disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1002756DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3075978PMC
December 2010

Viruses in the faecal microbiota of monozygotic twins and their mothers.

Nature 2010 Jul;466(7304):334-8

Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA.

Viral diversity and life cycles are poorly understood in the human gut and other body habitats. Phages and their encoded functions may provide informative signatures of a human microbiota and of microbial community responses to various disturbances, and may indicate whether community health or dysfunction is manifest after apparent recovery from a disease or therapeutic intervention. Here we report sequencing of the viromes (metagenomes) of virus-like particles isolated from faecal samples collected from healthy adult female monozygotic twins and their mothers at three time points over a one-year period. We compared these data sets with data sets of sequenced bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes and total-faecal-community DNA. Co-twins and their mothers share a significantly greater degree of similarity in their faecal bacterial communities than do unrelated individuals. In contrast, viromes are unique to individuals regardless of their degree of genetic relatedness. Despite remarkable interpersonal variations in viromes and their encoded functions, intrapersonal diversity is very low, with >95% of virotypes retained over the period surveyed, and with viromes dominated by a few temperate phages that exhibit remarkable genetic stability. These results indicate that a predatory viral-microbial dynamic, manifest in a number of other characterized environmental ecosystems, is notably absent in the very distal intestine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature09199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2919852PMC
July 2010

Merkel cell polyomavirus expression in merkel cell carcinomas and its absence in combined tumors and pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas.

Am J Surg Pathol 2009 Sep;33(9):1378-85

Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is the eponym for primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma. Recently, a new polyoma virus has been identified that is clonally integrated in the genome of the majority of MCCs, with truncating mutations in the viral large T antigen gene. We examined the presence of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) in a set of 17 frozen tumor samples by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; 15 of them (88%) were positive. Sections from corresponding archival material were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with the novel monoclonal antibody CM2B4, generated against a predicted antigenic epitope on the MCV T antigen, and tested for the expression of cytokeratin 20 (CK20). Sufficient archival material for IHC was available in only 15 of the 17 cases whose frozen tissue samples had been studied by polymerase chain reaction. Of the 15 tumors analyzed immunohistochemically, 10 (67%) showed positive labeling with CM2B4, 14 (93%) expressed CK20. A tissue microarray of 36 MCCs, 7 combined squamous and neuroendocrine carcinomas of the skin, and 26 pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas were also examined by IHC. Of the 36 MCCs assembled on a microarray, 32 (89%) tumors expressed CK20, and 27 (75%) were immunoreactive with CM2B4. The skin tumors with a combined squamous and neuroendocrine phenotype and all pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas failed to react with CM2B4. Our study shows that CM2B4 is a useful reagent for the diagnosis of MCC. It labels the majority of MCCs, but fails to react with pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas. We also found that neuroendocrine carcinomas of the skin arising in association with a squamous cell carcinoma seem to be independent of MCV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAS.0b013e3181aa30a5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2932664PMC
September 2009

Hospitalist services: an evolving opportunity.

Nurse Pract 2008 May;33(5):9-10

Center for Clinical Research and Scholarship at Rush University Medical Center, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NPR.0000317480.27544.66DOI Listing
May 2008

Associations between parental report of the home food environment and adolescent intakes of fruits, vegetables and dairy foods.

Public Health Nutr 2005 Feb;8(1):77-85

Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 1300 South 2nd Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA.

Objective: This study examines parental report of household food availability, parent dietary intake and associations with adolescent intakes of fruits, vegetables and dairy foods.

Design: Cross-sectional study. Adolescents completed the Project EAT survey and the Youth Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire at school. Parents of adolescents were interviewed by telephone about the home food environment, eating habits and weight-related behaviours. General linear modelling was used to compare dietary intakes of adolescents across different levels of household food availability and parental intakes.

Subjects/setting: The study sample included 902 adolescents and their parent or guardian.

Results: Many parents were not consuming the minimum number of daily recommended fruit (44.5%), vegetable (69.9%) or dairy (46.9%) servings. While most parents reported that fruits and vegetables were available at home (90.3%) and vegetables were usually served at dinner (87.0%), fewer parents reported milk was served at meals (66.6%). Soft drinks were usually available at home (56.8%). Among girls, household availability was positively associated with fruit and vegetable intake (ttrend=2.70, P<0.01) and soft drink availability was inversely associated with dairy intake (ttrend=2.08, P=0.04). Among boys, serving milk at meals was positively associated with dairy intake (ttrend=3.65, P<0.01). Parental intakes were positively associated with dairy intake for boys (ttrend=2.04, P=0.04), and with dairy (ttrend=2.43, P=0.01), vegetable (ttrend=3.72, P<0.01) and fruit (ttrend=3.17, P<0.01) intakes for girls.

Conclusions/applications: Interventions designed to help adolescents improve consumption of fruits, vegetables and dairy foods may be enhanced by including a parental component aimed at increasing household availability and parents' intake of healthful food choices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/phn2005661DOI Listing
February 2005