Publications by authors named "Nicole Corsten-Janssen"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Maternal occupational exposure and congenital heart defects in offspring.

Scand J Work Environ Health 2020 11 30;46(6):599-608. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, -Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands.

Objectives Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most prevalent congenital anomalies. This study aims to examine the association between maternal occupational exposures to organic and mineral dust, solvents, pesticides, and metal dust and fumes and CHD in the offspring, assessing several subgroups of CHD. Methods For this case-control study, we examined 1174 cases with CHD from EUROCAT Northern Netherlands and 5602 controls without congenital anomalies from the Lifelines cohort study. Information on maternal jobs held early in pregnancy was collected via self-administered questionnaires, and job titles were linked to occupational exposures using a job exposure matrix. Results An association was found between organic dust exposure and coarctation of aorta [adjusted odds ratio (OR ) 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-3.59] and pulmonary (valve) stenosis in combination with ventricular septal defect (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.07-6.73). Mineral dust exposure was associated with increased risk of coarctation of aorta (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.21-7.13) and pulmonary valve stenosis (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.10-3.62). Exposure to metal dust and fumes was infrequent but was associated with CHD in general (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.09-5.30). Exposure to both mineral dust and metal dust and fumes was associated with septal defects (OR 3.23, 95% CI 1.14-9.11). Any maternal occupational exposure was associated with a lower risk of aortic stenosis (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.11-0.94). Conclusions Women should take preventive measures or avoid exposure to mineral and organic dust as well as metal dust and fumes early in pregnancy as this could possibly affect foetal heart development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3912DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7737813PMC
November 2020

A prospective study on rapid exome sequencing as a diagnostic test for multiple congenital anomalies on fetal ultrasound.

Prenat Diagn 2020 09 20;40(10):1300-1309. Epub 2020 Jul 20.

Department of Genetics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Objective: Conventional genetic tests (quantitative fluorescent-PCR [QF-PCR] and single nucleotide polymorphism-array) only diagnose ~40% of fetuses showing ultrasound abnormalities. Rapid exome sequencing (rES) may improve this diagnostic yield, but includes challenges such as uncertainties in fetal phenotyping, variant interpretation, incidental unsolicited findings, and rapid turnaround times. In this study, we implemented rES in prenatal care to increase diagnostic yield.

Methods: We prospectively studied 55 fetuses. Inclusion criteria were: (a) two or more independent major fetal anomalies, (b) hydrops fetalis or bilateral renal cysts alone, or (c) one major fetal anomaly and a first-degree relative with the same anomaly. In addition to conventional genetic tests, we performed trio rES analysis using a custom virtual gene panel of ~3850 Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) genes.

Results: We established a genetic rES-based diagnosis in 8 out of 23 fetuses (35%) without QF-PCR or array abnormalities. Diagnoses included MIRAGE (SAMD9), Zellweger (PEX1), Walker-Warburg (POMGNT1), Noonan (PTNP11), Kabuki (KMT2D), and CHARGE (CHD7) syndrome and two cases of Osteogenesis Imperfecta type 2 (COL1A1). In six cases, rES diagnosis aided perinatal management. The median turnaround time was 14 (range 8-20) days.

Conclusion: Implementing rES as a routine test in the prenatal setting is challenging but technically feasible, with a promising diagnostic yield and significant clinical relevance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5781DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7540374PMC
September 2020

Rapid whole exome sequencing in pregnancies to identify the underlying genetic cause in fetuses with congenital anomalies detected by ultrasound imaging.

Prenat Diagn 2020 07 5;40(8):972-983. Epub 2020 May 5.

Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic yield and clinical utility of trio-based rapid whole exome sequencing (rWES) in pregnancies of fetuses with a wide range of congenital anomalies detected by ultrasound imaging.

Methods: In this observational study, we analyzed the first 54 cases referred to our laboratory for prenatal rWES to support clinical decision making, after the sonographic detection of fetal congenital anomalies. The most common identified congenital anomalies were skeletal dysplasia (n = 20), multiple major fetal congenital anomalies (n = 17) and intracerebral structural anomalies (n = 7).

Results: A conclusive diagnosis was identified in 18 of the 54 cases (33%). Pathogenic variants were detected most often in fetuses with skeletal dysplasia (n = 11) followed by fetuses with multiple major fetal congenital anomalies (n = 4) and intracerebral structural anomalies (n = 3). A survey, completed by the physicians for 37 of 54 cases, indicated that the rWES results impacted clinical decision making in 68% of cases.

Conclusions: These results suggest that rWES improves prenatal diagnosis of fetuses with congenital anomalies, and has an important impact on prenatal and peripartum parental and clinical decision making.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5717DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7497059PMC
July 2020

Cohesin complex-associated holoprosencephaly.

Brain 2019 09;142(9):2631-2643

Medical Genetics, Medical Faculty, Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Marked by incomplete division of the embryonic forebrain, holoprosencephaly is one of the most common human developmental disorders. Despite decades of phenotype-driven research, 80-90% of aneuploidy-negative holoprosencephaly individuals with a probable genetic aetiology do not have a genetic diagnosis. Here we report holoprosencephaly associated with variants in the two X-linked cohesin complex genes, STAG2 and SMC1A, with loss-of-function variants in 10 individuals and a missense variant in one. Additionally, we report four individuals with variants in the cohesin complex genes that are not X-linked, SMC3 and RAD21. Using whole mount in situ hybridization, we show that STAG2 and SMC1A are expressed in the prosencephalic neural folds during primary neurulation in the mouse, consistent with forebrain morphogenesis and holoprosencephaly pathogenesis. Finally, we found that shRNA knockdown of STAG2 and SMC1A causes aberrant expression of HPE-associated genes ZIC2, GLI2, SMAD3 and FGFR1 in human neural stem cells. These findings show the cohesin complex as an important regulator of median forebrain development and X-linked inheritance patterns in holoprosencephaly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awz210DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245359PMC
September 2019

Variable cardiovascular phenotypes associated with SMAD2 pathogenic variants.

Hum Mutat 2018 12 24;39(12):1875-1884. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Division of Genetics and Genomic Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

SMAD2 is a downstream effector in the TGF-β signaling pathway, which is important for pattern formation and tissue differentiation. Pathogenic variants in SMAD2 have been reported in association with arterial aneurysms and dissections and in large cohorts of subjects with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). We used whole exome sequencing (WES) to investigate the molecular cause of CHD and other congenital anomalies in three probands and of an arterial aneurysm in an additional patient. Patients 1 and 2 presented with complex CHD, developmental delay, seizures, dysmorphic features, short stature, and poor weight gain. Patient 3 was a fetus with complex CHD and heterotaxy. The fourth patient is an adult female with aortic root aneurysm and physical features suggestive of a connective tissue disorder. WES identified pathogenic truncating variants, a splice variant, and a predicted deleterious missense variant in SMAD2. We compare the phenotypes and genotypes in our patients with previously reported cases. Our data suggest two distinct phenotypes associated with pathogenic variants in SMAD2: complex CHD with or without laterality defects and other congenital anomalies, and a late-onset vascular phenotype characterized by arterial aneurysms with connective tissue abnormalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23627DOI Listing
December 2018

High Rate of Recurrent De Novo Mutations in Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathies.

Am J Hum Genet 2017 Nov;101(5):664-685

Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine, St. Mary's Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M13 9WL, UK.

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE) is a group of conditions characterized by the co-occurrence of epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID), typically with developmental plateauing or regression associated with frequent epileptiform activity. The cause of DEE remains unknown in the majority of cases. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in 197 individuals with unexplained DEE and pharmaco-resistant seizures and in their unaffected parents. We focused our attention on de novo mutations (DNMs) and identified candidate genes containing such variants. We sought to identify additional subjects with DNMs in these genes by performing targeted sequencing in another series of individuals with DEE and by mining various sequencing datasets. We also performed meta-analyses to document enrichment of DNMs in candidate genes by leveraging our WGS dataset with those of several DEE and ID series. By combining these strategies, we were able to provide a causal link between DEE and the following genes: NTRK2, GABRB2, CLTC, DHDDS, NUS1, RAB11A, GABBR2, and SNAP25. Overall, we established a molecular diagnosis in 63/197 (32%) individuals in our WGS series. The main cause of DEE in these individuals was de novo point mutations (53/63 solved cases), followed by inherited mutations (6/63 solved cases) and de novo CNVs (4/63 solved cases). De novo missense variants explained a larger proportion of individuals in our series than in other series that were primarily ascertained because of ID. Moreover, these DNMs were more frequently recurrent than those identified in ID series. These observations indicate that the genetic landscape of DEE might be different from that of ID without epilepsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.09.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5673604PMC
November 2017

Clinical and molecular effects of CHD7 in the heart.

Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 2017 12 31;175(4):487-495. Epub 2017 Oct 31.

UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, Section Developmental Biology of Birth Defects, London, UK.

Heart defects caused by loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 are a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in CHARGE syndrome. Here we review the clinical and molecular aspects of CHD7 that are related to the cardiovascular manifestations of the syndrome. The types of heart defects found in patients with CHD7 mutations are variable, with an overrepresentation of atrioventricular septal defect and outflow tract defect including aortic arch anomalies compared to nonsyndromic heart defects. Chd7 haploinsufficiency in mouse is a good model for studying the heart effects seen in CHARGE syndrome, and mouse models reveal a role for Chd7 in multiple lineages during heart development. Formation of the great vessels requires Chd7 expression in the pharyngeal surface ectoderm, and this expression likely has an non-autonomous effect on neural crest cells. In the cardiogenic mesoderm, Chd7 is required for atrioventricular cushion development and septation of the outflow tract. Emerging knowledge about the function of CHD7 in the heart indicates that it may act in concert with transcription factors such as TBX1 and SMADs to regulate genes such as p53 and the cardiac transcription factor NKX2.5.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.c.31590DOI Listing
December 2017

Congenital arch vessel anomalies in CHARGE syndrome: A frequent feature with risk for co-morbidity.

Int J Cardiol Heart Vasc 2016 Sep 25;12:21-25. Epub 2016 May 25.

Pediatric Cardiology, Dana-Dwek Children's Hospital, Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Background: CHARGE syndrome is a complex multiple congenital malformation disorder with variable expression that is caused by mutations in the gene. Variable heart defects occur in 74% of patients with a mutation, with an overrepresentation of atrioventricular septal defects and conotruncal defects - including arch vessel anomalies.

Methods And Results: We report an index patient with an arch vessel anomaly underlying serious feeding problems that resolved after arch vessel surgery. This led us to examine the incidence of arch vessel anomalies in our previously studied cohort of 299 patients with a mutation. Forty-two patients (14%) had an aortic arch anomaly, mostly aberrant subclavian artery or right aortic arch, which usually occurred in combination with other congenital heart defects (81%). The majority of these patients also had feeding problems that may be linked to their arch anomaly, but insufficient information was available to exclude other causes.

Conclusions: Arch vessel anomalies occur in a significant proportion of patients with a mutation, and these anomalies may cause morbidity due to compression of the esophagus or trachea. Since symptoms of vascular compression can mimic those caused by other abnormalities in CHARGE syndrome, it is important to be aware of arch vessel anomalies in this complex patient category. Whether a solitary arch vessel anomaly is an indicator for CHARGE syndrome still needs to be studied, but doctors should look out for other CHARGE syndrome features in patients with arch vessel anomalies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcha.2016.05.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5454153PMC
September 2016

CHD7 mutations are not a major cause of atrioventricular septal and conotruncal heart defects.

Am J Med Genet A 2014 Dec 24;164A(12):3003-9. Epub 2014 Sep 24.

University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, Netherlands.

Since 2004, CHD7 mutations have been a known cause of CHARGE (Coloboma, Heart defects, Atresia of choane, Retardation of growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies) syndrome, but the full clinical spectrum of CHD7 mutations is only now gradually emerging. CHD7 mutations have been identified in patients who do not fulfill the clinical criteria for CHARGE syndrome and in patients with overlapping syndromes. Variable congenital heart defects occur in the majority of patients with CHD7 mutations, with an overrepresentation of atrioventricular septal defects and conotruncal heart defects. This prompted us to study CHD7 in 46 patients with these heart defects and one other feature of CHARGE syndrome. We identified two CHD7 variants that were inherited from a healthy parent (c.3778 + 17C > T, c.7294G > A), but no pathogenic CHD7 mutations. We conclude that CHD7 mutations are not a major cause of the atrioventricular septal defects and conotruncal heart defects, not even if one extra phenotypic feature of CHARGE syndrome is present. Therefore, CHD7 analysis should not be performed routinely in this group of patients. However, we do recommend adding CHD7 to massive parallel sequencing gene panels for diagnostic work in patients with syndromic heart defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.36747DOI Listing
December 2014

Definition of 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome reveals overlap with CHARGE syndrome and 22q11 deletion syndrome phenotypes.

Am J Med Genet A 2014 Nov 22;164A(11):2843-8. Epub 2014 Sep 22.

Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Microdeletions of the 5q11.2 region are rare; in literature only two patients with a deletion in this region have been reported so far. In this study, we describe four additional patients and further define this new 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. A comparison of the features observed in all six patients with overlapping 5q11.2 deletions showed a phenotypic spectrum that overlaps with CHARGE syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome including choanal atresia, developmental delay, heart defects, external ear abnormalities, and short stature. No colobomas or abnormalities of semicircular canals and olfactory nerves were reported. Two male patients had genital abnormalities. We estimated a 2.0 Mb (53.0-55.0 Mb) Shortest Region of Overlap (SRO) for the main clinical characteristics of the syndrome. This region contains nine genes and two non-coding microRNAs. In this region DHX29 serves as the candidate gene as it encodes an ATP-dependent RNA-helicase that is involved in the initiation of RNA translation. Screening a small cohort of 14 patients who presented the main features, however, did not reveal any pathogenic abnormalities of DHX29.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.36680DOI Listing
November 2014

The cardiac phenotype in patients with a CHD7 mutation.

Circ Cardiovasc Genet 2013 Jun;6(3):248-54

Department of Genetics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 cause Coloboma, Heart Disease, Atresia of Choanae, Retardation of Growth and/or Development, Genital Hypoplasia, and Ear Abnormalities With or Without Deafness (CHARGE) syndrome, a variable combination of multiple congenital malformations including heart defects. Heart defects are reported in 70% to 92% of patients with a CHD7 mutation, but most studies are small and do not provide a detailed classification of the defects. We present the first, detailed, descriptive study on the cardiac phenotype of 299 patients with a CHD7 mutation and discuss the role of CHD7 in cardiac development.

Methods And Results: We collected information on congenital heart defects in 299 patients with a pathogenic CHD7 mutation, of whom 220 (74%) had a congenital heart defect. Detailed information on the heart defects was available for 202 of these patients. We classified the heart defects based on embryonic cardiac development and compared the distribution to 1007 equally classified nonsyndromic heart defects of patients registered by EUROCAT, a European Registry of Congenital Anomalies. Heart defects are highly variable in patients with CHD7 mutations, but atrioventricular septal defects and conotruncal heart defects are over-represented. Sex did not have an effect on the presence of heart defects, but truncating CHD7 mutations resulted in a heart defect significantly more often than missense or splice-site mutations (χ², P<0.001).

Conclusions: CHD7 plays an important role in cardiac development, given that we found a wide range of heart defects in 74% of a large cohort of patients with a CHD7 mutation. Conotruncal defects and atrioventricular septal defects are over-represented in patients with CHD7 mutations compared with patients with nonsyndromic heart defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.113.000054DOI Listing
June 2013