Dr. Nicolas Evzonas, PhD  - CRPMS (Centre for research in Psychoanalysis, Medicine and Society), University Paris Diderot

Dr. Nicolas Evzonas

PhD

CRPMS (Centre for research in Psychoanalysis, Medicine and Society), University Paris Diderot

Paris | France

Additional Specialties: Psychoanalysis

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-1658-4915

Dr. Nicolas Evzonas, PhD  - CRPMS (Centre for research in Psychoanalysis, Medicine and Society), University Paris Diderot

Dr. Nicolas Evzonas

PhD

Introduction

Dr Nicolas Evzonas (PhD in Literature) is a psychodynamically oriented therapist with a private and institutional practice in Paris. He is also a researcher at the Center for Research in Psychoanalysis, Medicine, and Society (CRPMS) at the University of Paris. He is the author of some forty articles in the fields of literature, cinema, psychopathology, and psychoanalysis written in French, English, Greek, Portuguese, and Spanish. He is currently co-editing a special issue of Psychoanalytic Inquiry on “Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Issues in France: Sexualities, Gender, Class, and Race.”

Primary Affiliation: CRPMS (Centre for research in Psychoanalysis, Medicine and Society), University Paris Diderot - Paris , France

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Publications

6Publications

50Reads

17Profile Views

The Therapist's Transition.

Psychoanal Rev 2019 Oct;106(5):385-416

CRPMS (Centre for Research in Psychoanalysis, Medicine, and Society), University of Paris, F-75013 Paris, France. E-mail:

Eager to distance himself from the clinical mistreatment and theoretical arrogance shown toward a gender-variant population, a self-identified cis-gendered male clinician-researcher narrates his experiences, difficulties, and doubts from a psychoanalytic standpoint in his interactions with a transgender adult in an institutional setting. He thus addresses from a pluralistic perspective the intrapsychic concerns and sociocultural norms that contribute to the patient's suffering, as well as the therapist's own vulnerability and countertransference challenges in this situation. By reflecting on the very traps that he fell into when writing a previous version of this article, the author proposes a focused narrative, co-signed by his supervisor, to provide the reader with a cautionary tale of how easily a clinician's efforts to understand may devolve into objectifications embedded in the history of analytic thinking.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/prev.2019.106.5.385DOI Listing
October 2019

Sandor Ferenczi's Multiple Confusions of Tongues and their Influence on Psychoanalytic Thinking

Authors:
Nicolas Evzonas

Nicolas Evzonas (2018) Sándor Ferenczi’s multiple confusions of tongues and their influence on psychoanalytical thinking, The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 99:1, 230-247, DOI: 10.1080/00207578.2017.1399072

The International Journal of Psychoanalysis

Using a poststructuralist model, this article explores the lecture given by Ferenczi and published under the title “Confusion of Tongues between Adults and the Child—(The Language of Tenderness and Passion).” By initially focusing on the closed structure of the text, the author identifies two types of confusion of tongues that are closely interlinked: the confusion between adults and the child, and that between the analyst and the analysand. By then placing the manuscript within the corpus of Ferenczi, he connects it to the latter’s multilingualism and pleads in favour of autobiographical determinants for psychoanalytic conceptualizations. This positioning of the text in its historical framework also enables it to be situated in the context of the metapsychological confusion of tongues between Freud and Ferenczi, and to delimit the influence of Ferenczi’s ideas in psychoanalytic posterity.

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October 2018
2 Reads

Jealousy as a Driving Force for Murder.

Authors:
Nicolas Evzonas

Psychoanal Rev 2018 Jun;105(3):257-277

CRPMS (Centre for Research in Psychoanalysis, Medicine, and Society), UFR of Psychoanalytic Studies, Diderot University-Paris VII, Sorbonne Paris Cité University Group, 8, Rue Albert Einstein, 75013 Paris, France. E-mail:

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https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/10.1521/prev.2018.105.3.257
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/prev.2018.105.3.257DOI Listing
June 2018
28 Reads

Achilles: A Homeric hero enamoured with the absolute.

Authors:
Nicolas Evzonas

Int J Psychoanal 2017 Jul 21. Epub 2017 Jul 21.

CRPMS (Centre de Recherche Psychanalyse, Médecine et Société) [Centre for Research on Psychoanalysis, Medicine and Society] 8, rue Albert Einstein, 75013, Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-8315.12692DOI Listing
July 2017
22 Reads

The Tragedy of Eros in a Bucolic Short Story by Alexandros Papadiamantis

DOI: 10.5325/mediterraneanstu.23.1.0046

Mediterranean Studies

This contribution explores the themes of fantasy underlying “Eros the Harvester” (“Θέρος-Ἔρος”), a short story by modern Greece’s most emblematic prose writer, Alexandros Papadiamantis. A close reading of the eventful love affair depicted in this story, subtitled “A May Day Idyll,” uncovers the dramatic consequences of consummation and introduces the wider theme of the author’s problematic view of erotic love. The narrative includes an array of motifs whose complete meaning fully develops in Papadiamantis’s later writings: the interconnectedness of blossoming virginity and spring; the close relationship between two characters representing antithetical expressions of desire; the voyeuristic and sadistic drives of the narrator; an ambivalent attitude toward nuptials; and the overdetermined symbolism of bleeding.

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June 2015
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Metaphorical Transgression and Transfiguration of Loss through Language in Alexandros Papadiamantis’s “Under the Royal Oak Tree

Journal of Modern Greek Studies Johns Hopkins University Press Volume 32, Number 1, May 2014 pp. 111-131 10.1353/mgs.2014.0030

Journal of Modern Greek Studies

  • The present contribution offers a close reading of Alexandros Papadiamant­ is’s first ­person short story «Ὑπὸ τὴν βασιλικὴν δρῦν» (“Under the Royal Oak Tree”), published in March 1901. Behind its euphoric atmosphere and carefree facade, which relates a child’s attraction to a majestic tree, this less­ than­ re­alistic tale conceals a poignant struggle between sexual desire and parental and religious prohibition. The tree’s transformation into a ravishing young woman during the main character’s sleep—the focal point of the story—along with the free associations of the dreamer reveal a blend of oedipal fantasies and recurring Papadiamantian themes. Furthermore, the extremely rich and overdetermined vocabulary of the text transforms the oak tree into a pluralistic symbol.  

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May 2014
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