Publications by authors named "Nian-Hong Yang"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Optimal gestational weight gain in Chinese pregnant women by Chinese-specific BMI categories: a multicentre prospective cohort study.

Public Health Nutr 2021 Apr 12:1-11. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou510080, People's Republic of China.

Objective: To establish optimal gestational weight gain (GWG) in Chinese pregnant women by Chinese-specific BMI categories and compare the new recommendations with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2009 guidelines.

Design: Multicentre, prospective cohort study. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the OR, 95 % CI and the predicted probabilities of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The optimal GWG range was defined as the range that did not exceed a 1 % increase from the lowest predicted probability in each pre-pregnancy BMI group.

Setting: From nine cities in mainland China.

Participants: A total of 3731 women with singleton pregnancy were recruited from April 2013 to December 2014.

Results: The optimal GWG (ranges) by Chinese-specific BMI was 15·0 (12·8-17·1), 14·2 (12·1-16·4) and 12·6 (10·4-14·9) kg for underweight, normal weight and overweight pregnant women, respectively. Inappropriate GWG was associated with several adverse pregnancy outcomes. Compared with women gaining weight within our proposed recommendations, women with excessive GWG had higher risk for macrosomia, large for gestational age and caesarean section, whereas those with inadequate GWG had higher risk for low birth weight, small for gestational age and preterm delivery. The comparison between our proposed recommendations and IOM 2009 guidelines showed that our recommendations were comparable with the IOM 2009 guidelines and could well predict the risk of several adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Conclusions: Inappropriate GWG was associated with higher risk of several adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimal GWG recommendations proposed in the present study could be applied to Chinese pregnant women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980021001622DOI Listing
April 2021

Households Hunger: The Key Attribute to Anthropometric Failures of Children in West Oromia (Ethiopia).

Curr Med Sci 2020 Jun 17;40(3):580-585. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Department of Nutrition & Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, China.

Poor nutrition is the underlying cause of child death. However, comprehensive data showing the relationships between dietary-practices, food security, and nutritional status are scant. The present study aimed to examine the association of inappropriate feeding practices and household-hunger with anthropometric measures in children aged 6-23 months. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on randomly selected 525-households. Semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaires were used to gather data on socio-demographic, child health, dietary-practices and household-hunger. Weight and height/length of the children were measured and analyzed using the new World Health Organization (WHO) Growth Standards. The prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight as well as composite index of anthropometric failure (CIFA) were used to indicate under-nutrition. The overall prevalence of inappropriate feeding practices was 22.9%, rate of moderate households-hunger was 12.4%, and the prevalence of stunting, underweight and wasting was 16.2%, 6.9% and 6.3%, respectively, while the CIAF was 21.3%. The prevalence was significantly higher in young children aged 12-23 months than in infants aged 6-11 months. Children from households experiencing moderate hunger had significantly higher risk of being stunting (OR: 10.20; 95%CI: 2.00-51.50), underweight (OR:3.89; 95%CI: 1.40-10.90), wasting (OR: 1.97; 95%CI: 0.99-3.90), and CIAF (OR: 1.90; 95%CI: 1.05-3.45), than those residing in households experiencing no or mild hunger. Multi-disciplinary approaches are required to improve household food-security and child dietary practices, thus the nutritional status among young children.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11596-020-2216-yDOI Listing
June 2020

Effect of ovariectomy on serum adiponectin levels and visceral fat in rats.

J Huazhong Univ Sci Technolog Med Sci 2014 Dec 6;34(6):825-829. Epub 2014 Dec 6.

Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, China.

This study was aimed to examine the effect of ovariectomy on visceral fat, serum adiponectin levels and lipid profile. Forty-five female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups (n=15 each): ovariectomized group (OVX), ovariectomized plus estrogen-treated group (OVX+E2), and sham-operated group (SHAM). Body weight, abdominal adipose tissues, serum adiponectin and lipid profile were measured and compared among the groups after three-month feeding post-surgery. Significant increases in body weight and visceral fat were found in ovariectomized rats when compared with sham-operated ones and significant increases were also observed in serum adiponectin, triglyceride and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in ovariectomized rats. Body weight, visceral fat and serum adiponectin levels were profoundly reduced in OVX+E2 group as compared with OVX group. It was concluded that ovarian hormone deficiency induced by ovariectomy leads to significant increases in body weight and visceral fat, along with increased serum adiponectin, triglyceride and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in rats. Attenuation in these changes can be achieved by estrogen supplementation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11596-014-1360-7DOI Listing
December 2014

[Relation between peptide YY 3-36 and dietary induced obesity resistant rats].

Wei Sheng Yan Jiu 2006 Jan;35(1):49-51

Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.

Objective: To study the plasma concentration of peptide YY3 - 36 (PYY3-36) and the expression levels of PYY mRNA of ileum and colon in dietary induced obesity (DIO) and dietary induced obesity resistant (DIO-R) rats and the relation between PYY3-36 and DIO-R rats.

Methods: Thirty-six female SD rats were randomly divided into high-fat diet group (n = 27) and chow fed control group (n = 9), after 13 weeks of either a high-fat diet or chew fed diet, the high-fat diet group was subdivided into DIO and DIO-R group according to the final body weight. Weight gain, caloric intake, the concentration of PYY3-36 and the expression levels of PYY mRNA were measured and compared.

Results: The total caloric intake of DIO-R rats was lower than DIO rats (P < 0.01), while no significant difference was found between DIO-R and control rats (P > 0.05). The concentration of PYY3-36 and the expressions of PYY mRNA of ileum and colon in DIO-R rats were higher significantly than that of the DIO and control rats (P < 0.01), while no significant difference was found between DIO and control group (P > 0.05), except that PYY mRNA of ileum was advanced in DIO group (P < 0.01).

Conclusion: On the High-fat diet, SD rats showed different susceptibility to obese and energy intake, increased levels of PYY3-36 and PYY mRNA might be related to dietary induced obesity resistant.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2006

[UCPs and PPARgamma2 mRNA in diet induced obesity resistant rats].

Wei Sheng Yan Jiu 2005 Sep;34(5):556-8

Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.

Objective: To explore the expression of uncoupling proteins (UCP) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptorgamma2 (PPARgamma2) mRNA in white adipose of high-fat diet induced obesity resistant rats.

Methods: Thirty-six female SD rats were randomly divided into high-fat diet group (n = 27) and chow fed control group (n = 9), and given either high-fat diet or chow for thirteen weeks. Then the high-fat diet group was subdivided into Dietary Induced Obesity (DIO) and Dietary Induced Obesity Resistant (DIO-R) group according to the final body weight. Basic parameters, fasting blood glucose (FBG), blood lipid levels were measured and compared. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure the expression of UCP2, UCP3, and PPARgamma2 mRNA in white adipose.

Results: Adipose deposits, body fat percent, TC, and TG conceration of both DIO-R and DIO groups were significantly higher than those in control group, while body weight, body fat percent and TG level were significantly lower in DIO-R than DIO rats. The expression of UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA in white adipose of DIO-R rats were significantly higher than those of DIO and control group. The expression of PPARgamma2 mRNA in white adipose of DIO-R group was significantly lower than that in DIO group.

Conclusion: High-fat diet induced obesity resistance were closely associated with the increased UCP2, UCP3, and decreased PPARgamma2 mRNA in white adipose.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2005

[Relationship between serum levels of leptin and glucose, lipids in simple obese children].

Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi 2003 May;37(3):186-8

Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.

Objective: To investigate the relationship between fasting serum levels of leptin, glucose, insulin resistance, lipids in simple obese children.

Methods: Fasting serum levels of leptin and insulin (Fins) were measured by RIA in 42 obese and 42 normally-weighted children matched on age, sex and height, and their total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) were analyzed with enzymatic methods. HOMA-IR and LDL-C were calculated.

Results: Serum level of leptin was (2.74 - 45.12) micro g/L and (0.53 - 10.18) micro g/L in obese and normally-weighted children, respectively, with an average level of leptin (log) significantly higher in obese group than that in control group (P < 0.001). Serum level of leptin was positively correlated with BMI, WHR and percentage of body fat. Of obese children, 83% were leptin resistant. Serum levels of TC, TG, LDL-C and insulin were significantly higher in obese leptin-resistant group than those in normally-weighted control group, but no significant difference in them between obese leptin-sensitive group and its normally-weighted control group was observed. Significantly higher serum levels of TG and lower HDL-C were observed in obese leptin-resistant group, as compared with those in obese leptin-sensitive group.

Conclusions: A big difference in serum level of leptin between obese and normally-weighted children was found, suggesting most obese children were resistant to endogenous leptin. Leptin resistance correlated significantly with the risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, indicating serum level of leptin could be used as an indicator in screening obese children at high risk.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2003