Publications by authors named "Nguyen Thi Thuy Nga"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Formation of spherical Sn particles by reducing SnO film in floating wire-assisted H/Ar plasma at atmospheric pressure.

Sci Rep 2020 Oct 20;10(1):17770. Epub 2020 Oct 20.

Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8601, Japan.

A green method to synthesize spherical Sn particles by reducing SnO film in atmospheric-pressure H/Ar plasma at low temperatures for various applications is presented. The floating wire-assisted remotely-generated plasma with a mixture of 0.05% H/Ar gas formed spherical metallic Sn particles by reducing a SnO layer on glass substrate. During the reduction process, H radical density was measured by using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, and plasma properties including electron density and gas temperature were diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy. The inductively coupled generated plasma with a high electron density of 10 cm, a hydrogen atom density of 10 cm, and a gas temperature of 940 K was obtained at a remote region distance of 150 mm where the SnO/glass substrate was placed for plasma treatment. The process has been modeled on the spherical Sn formation based on the reduction of SnO films using H radicals. Depending on the treatment condition, the total reduction area, where spherical Sn particles formed, was enlarged and could reach 300 mm after 2 min. The substrate temperature affected the expansion rate of the total reduction area and the growth of the Sn spheres.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-74663-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7576790PMC
October 2020

Traumatic lumbar hernia: successful mesh repair using bone anchors.

ANZ J Surg 2021 03 6;91(3):469-470. Epub 2020 Aug 6.

Department of Upper Gastrointestinal and General Surgery, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.16206DOI Listing
March 2021

Family-Based Health Insurance for Informal Sector Workers in Vietnam: Why Does Enrolment Remain Low?

Asia Pac J Public Health 2018 Nov 20;30(8):699-707. Epub 2018 Oct 20.

Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia.

Providing financial protection to the whole population is a top health policy priority of many countries. However, expanding social health insurance coverage to the "informal sector worker" is a challenge in many developing countries. This study analyzed the reasons for the limited coverage of health insurance for informal sector workers. Direct interviews were carried out with 391 uninsured households in Vietnam, followed by in-depth interviews with 11 key stakeholders. The study offers several possible explanations for the low enrollment in family-based health insurance scheme at both the demand and supply sides, such as inability to pay the premium, lack of information, perceived poor quality of primary health care services, and complicated enrollment procedures. The study suggests that a partial government subsidy and improvement in the quality of primary health care are crucial strategies for health insurance expansion for the informal sector workers and their families.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1010539518807601DOI Listing
November 2018

Family-Based Social Health Insurance for Informal Workers in Vietnam: Willingness to Pay and Its Determinants.

Asia Pac J Public Health 2018 09 15;30(6):512-520. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

2 Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

The study aimed to assess willingness to pay for family-based social health insurance and its determining factors among informal workers in Vietnam. A double-bounded dichotomous choice approach was used to elicit the willingness to pay of 391 heads of uninsured households. The study indicates that 48.8% of 391 uninsured households were willing to pay for family-based health insurance. The households were willing to pay about 921.9 thousand Vietnamese dongs per household per year (US$42). The factors that significantly affected willingness to pay were household income, number of uninsured members in a household, and sickness of the household head. The study suggests that a feasible premium for family-based health insurance supported by government subsidy, along with attention to the quality improvements of health services, could be an effective means to increase coverage among the informal sector workers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1010539518799785DOI Listing
September 2018

Capacity of Commune Health Stations in Chi Linh District, Hai Duong Province, for Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases.

Asia Pac J Public Health 2017 Jul;29(5_suppl):94S-101S

1 Hanoi University of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.

The primary health care system in Vietnam has been playing an important role in prevention and control of diseases. This study aimed to describe the capacity of commune health stations in Chi Linh district, Hai Duong province for prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). A mixed-methods (quantitative and qualitative approaches) approach was applied to collect data in 20 commune health stations. The participants, including health workers, stakeholders, and patients with NCDs, were selected for the study. The findings reported that the main activities of prevention and control of NCDs at commune health stations (CHSs) still focused on information-education-community (IECs), unqualified for providing screening, diagnosis, and treatments of NCDs. The capacity for prevention and control of NCDs in CHSs was inadequate to provide health care services related to prevention and control of NCDs and unmet with the community's demands. In order to ensure the role and implementation of primary care level, there is an urgent need to improve the capacity of CHSs for prevention and control of NCDs, particularly a national budget for NCDs prevention and control, the essential equipment and medicines recommended by the World Health Organization should be provided and available at the CHSs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1010539517717020DOI Listing
July 2017

Health insurance drop-out among adult population: findings from a study in a Health and demographic surveillance system in Northern Vietnam 2006-2013.

Glob Health Epidemiol Genom 2016 14;1:e16. Epub 2016 Oct 14.

Hanoi School of Public Health, 138 Giang Vo Street, Ba Dinh District, Hanoi, Vietnam.

The coverage of health insurance as measured by enrollment rates has increased significantly in Vietnam. However, maintaining health insurance to the some groups such as the farmer, the borderline poor and informal workers, etc. has been very challenging. This paper examines the situation of health insurance drop-out among the adult population in sub-rural areas of Northern Vietnam from 2006 to 2013, and analyzes several socio-economic correlates of the health insurance drop-out situation. Data used in this paper were obtained from Health and Demographic Surveillance System located in Chi Linh district, an urbanizing area, in a northern province of Vietnam. Descriptive analyses were used to describe the level and distribution of the health insurance drop-out status. Multiple logistic regressions were used to assess associations between the health insurance drop-out status and the independent variables. A total of 32 561 adults were investigated. We found that the cumulative percentage of health insurance drop-out among the study participants was 21.2%. Health insurance drop-out rates were higher among younger age groups, people with lower education, and those who worked as small trader and other informal jobs, and belonged to the non-poor households. Given the findings, further attention toward health insurance among these special populations is needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/gheg.2016.14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5870418PMC
October 2016

Evaluation of an algorithm for integrated management of childhood illness in an area of Vietnam with dengue transmission.

Trop Med Int Health 2004 May;9(5):573-81

Dong Nai Paediatric Centre, Bien Hoa, Vietnam.

Objectives: To determine whether nurses, using the WHO/UNICEF algorithm for integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI), modified to include dengue infection, satisfactorily classified children in an area endemic for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF).

Methods: Nurses assessed and classified, using the modified IMCI algorithm, a systematic sample of 1250 children aged 2 months to 10 years (n = 1250) presenting to a paediatric hospital in Dong Nai Province, Vietnam. Their classification was compared with that of a paediatrician, blind to the result of the nurses' assessment, which could be modified in the light of simple investigations, e.g. dengue serology.

Results: In children aged 2-59 months (n = 859), the nurses were able to classify, using the modified chart, the presenting illness in >99% of children and found more than one classification in 70%. For the children with pneumonia, diarrhoea, dengue shock syndrome, severe DHF and severe disease requiring urgent admission, the nurse's classification was >60% sensitive and >85% specific compared with that of the paediatrician. For the nurse's classification of DHF the specificity was 50-55% for the children <5 years and in children with definitive dengue serology. Alterations in the DHF algorithm improved specificity at the expense of sensitivity.

Conclusion: Using the IMCI chart, nurses classified appropriately many of the major clinical problems in sick children <5 years in southern Vietnam. However, further modifications will be required in the fever section, particularly for dengue. The impact of using the IMCI chart in peripheral health stations remains to be evaluated.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2004.01232.xDOI Listing
May 2004

Clinical diagnosis and assessment of severity of confirmed dengue infections in Vietnamese children: is the world health organization classification system helpful?

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2004 Feb;70(2):172-9

Dong Nai Paediatric Centre, Dong Nai Province, Bien Hoa, Vietnam.

Classification of dengue using the current World Health Organization (WHO) system is not straightforward. In a large prospective study of pediatric dengue, no clinical or basic laboratory parameters clearly differentiated between children with and without dengue, although petechiae and hepatomegaly were independently associated with the diagnosis. Among the 712 dengue-infected children there was considerable overlap in the major clinical features. Mucosal bleeding was observed with equal frequency in those with dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and petechiae, thrombocytopenia, and the tourniquet test differentiated poorly between the two diagnostic categories. Fifty-seven (18%) of 310 with shock did not fulfill all four criteria considered necessary for a diagnosis of DHF by the WHO, but use of the WHO provisional classification scheme resulted in considerable over-inflation of the DHF figures. If two separate entities truly exist rather than a continuous spectrum of disease, it is essential that some measure of capillary leak is included in any classification system, with less emphasis on bleeding and a specific platelet count.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2004
-->