Publications by authors named "Nguyen Huy Hoang"

54 Publications

Biliary atresia combined Wilson disease identified by whole exome sequencing in Vietnamese patient with severe liver failure.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2022 Jan;101(2):e28547

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 - Hoang Quoc Viet Str., Caugiay, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Rationale: Hepatobiliary diseases such as biliary atresia (BA), Wilson disease, and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis are common causes of morbidity and mortality in young children. Affected patients progress rapidly to end-stage cirrhosis and require liver transplantation or die. Mutations in many genes have been identified to play an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatobiliary diseases.

Patient Concerns And Diagnosis: In this study, we identified mutations in an 8-year-old girl who had severe liver failure. The patient was first diagnosed with BA at 2.5 months of age and has undergone Kasai surgery to connect the umbilical cord and jejunum. After that, the patient suddenly had unusual developments with symptoms of jaundice, acute liver failure with hemolysis. She was tested and diagnosed with Wilson disease.

Interventions And Outcomes: She was treated according to the regimen for a patient with Wilson disease but had abnormal progress leading to severe liver failure. Genetic analysis was performed by whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing methods. The genetic analysis revealed that the patient had a homozygous mutation (p.Gly17Glyfs77∗) in the KRT18 gene, a double heterozygous mutation (p.Ser105∗ and p.Pro992Leu) in the ATP7B gene, and a homozygous variant (p.Val444Ala) in the ABCB11 gene. In silico prediction of mutations indicated that these mutations are the cause of the severe liver failure in the patient.

Lesson: This is a rare clinical case of a BA patient combined with Wilson disease. Our results suggested that whole exome sequencing is an effective diagnostic tool and emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management to save lives and prevent serious complications in the patient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000028547DOI Listing
January 2022

The role of p.Val444Ala variant in the ABCB11 gene and susceptibility to biliary atresia in Vietnamese patients.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Nov;100(47):e28011

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Vietnam.

Abstract: Biliary atresia (BA) is the most serious type of obstructive cholangiopathy that occurs in infants. BA can be the cause of death in children under 2 years if untreated early. However, the etiology of the disease is not known. BA is considered to be the result of the destruction of the bile duct system including the accumulation of bile acids. The bile salt export pump, a transporter protein encoded by the ABCB11 gene, plays the main role in the exportation and accumulation of bile acids. The p.Val444Ala variant in this gene is known to be associated with many cholestatic diseases. However, to date no study have been performed to evaluate the association of this variant with susceptibility to the risk of BA. In this study, we aimed to identify the frequency of p.Val444Ala variant and the risk of BA in Vietnamese patients.The polymerase chain reaction (PCR)- restriction fragment length polymorphism method was used to determine the frequency of alleles c.1331T>C (p.Val444Ala, rs2287622) in the ABCB11 gene in 266 Vietnamese patients with BA and 150 healthy people. The gene segment containing the variant was amplified by PCR with specific primers, after that the PCR products were cut by HaeIII restriction enzyme and analyzed on agarose gel to determine the genotypes. The frequency of alleles was assessed statistically to determine the association between these alleles and the risk of disease in patients.In our study, the frequency of alleles c.1331T>C (p.Val444Ala, rs2287622) in the ABCB11 gene was investigated the first time in the patients with BA. The results showed that CC and TC genotypes were significantly different between BA patients and healthy people (P < .01), and the C allele was associated with an increased risk of BA (odds ratio = 2.47; 95% confidence interval: 1.84-3.32; P < .01). The initial results of clinical, biochemical, and genetic analysis in our study suggested that the p.Val444Ala variant in the ABCB11 gene may be a susceptibility factor for the disease in Vietnamese patients with BA. These results provided new insights into the role of this ABCB11 variant in the pathogenesis of BA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000028011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8615439PMC
November 2021

Five new seco-labdane-type diterpenoids from Caesalpinia latisiliqua.

Magn Reson Chem 2021 Dec 7. Epub 2021 Dec 7.

Institute of Marine Biochemistry, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Hanoi, Vietnam.

Five new seco-labdane-type diterpenoids, caesalatisics A-E (1-5), were isolated from the leaves of Caesalpinia latisiliqua (Cav.) Hattink. Their chemical structures were determined using 1D and 2D NMR, mass spectra, and circular dichroism spectroscopies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrc.5238DOI Listing
December 2021

Two novel CD40LG gene mutations causing X-linked hyper IgM syndrome in Vietnamese patients.

Clin Exp Med 2021 Nov 29. Epub 2021 Nov 29.

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 - Hoang Quoc Viet str., Caugiay, Hanoi, Vietnam.

The X-linked hyper IgM syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency disorder (PID) due to mutations in the CD40LG gene. Hyper IgM syndrome is characterized by the absence or decreased levels of IgG and IgA and normal or elevated IgM levels in serum. Affected patients become susceptible to infections such as pneumonia, diarrhea, and skin ulcer types. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only treatment currently available and ideally performed before the age of 10 years. Early, accurate diagnosis will contribute to the effective treatment for patients with hyper IgM. The patients from different Vietnamese families who have been diagnosed with hyper IgM at The Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Department, Vietnam National Hospital Pediatrics, were performed a genetic analysis using whole exome sequencing. The mutations were confirmed by the Sanger sequencing method in patients and their families. The influence of the mutations was predicted with the in silico analysis tools: PROVEAN, SIFT, PolyPhen-2, and MutationTaster. In this study, two novel mutations (p.Thr254fs and p.Leu138Phe) in the CD40LG gene were found in Vietnamese patients with X-linked hyper IgM syndrome. Our results contribute to the general understanding of the etiology of the disease and can help diagnose the different forms of PID.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10238-021-00774-0DOI Listing
November 2021

Alkaloids from with inhibitory effect on nitric oxide production lipopolysaccharide-stimulated in RAW264.7 macrophages.

J Asian Nat Prod Res 2021 Nov 13:1-6. Epub 2021 Nov 13.

Institute of Marine Biochemistry, VAST, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Caugiay, Hanoi 11307, Vietnam.

The chemical study of the acidic extract of leaves led to the isolation of one new alkaloid, vietnamine A () and eight known alkaloids (,)-2N-norberbamunine (), grisabine (), -dimethylgrisabine (), dauricine (), neothalibrine (), vietnamine (), xylopine (), and argentinine () by NMR and MS and comparing with the data reported in the literature. Compounds - were evaluated for inhibitory NO production in RAW 264.7 macrophages, LPS-stimulated. Compounds - significantly inhibited on NO production with the IC values of 6.8 ± 0.9, 9.8 ± 1.0, and 7.1 ± 0.4 µg/ml, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10286020.2021.1993833DOI Listing
November 2021

Identification of a Chitooligosaccharide Mechanism against Bacterial Leaf Blight on Rice by In Vitro and In Silico Studies.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Jul 27;22(15). Epub 2021 Jul 27.

School of Crop Production Technology, Institute of Agricultural Technology, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000, Thailand.

This study focuses on a commercial plant elicitor based on chitooligosaccharides (BIG), which aids in rice plant growth and disease resistance to bacterial leaf blight (BLB). When the pathogen () vigorously attacks rice that has suffered yield losses, it can cause damage in up to 20% of the plant. Furthermore, is a seed-borne pathogen that can survive in rice seeds for an extended period. In this study, when rice seeds were soaked and sprayed with BIG, there was a significant increase in shoot and root length, as well as plant biomass. Furthermore, BIG-treated rice plants showed a significant reduction in BLB severity of more than 33%. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) analysis was used to characterize BIG's mechanism in the chemical structure of rice leaves. The SR-FTIR results at 1650, 1735, and 1114 cm indicated changes in biochemical components such as pectins, lignins, proteins, and celluloses. These findings demonstrated that commercial BIG not only increased rice growth but also induced resistance to BLB. The drug's target enzyme, 1075 from (PDB ID: 5CY8), was analyzed for its interactions with polymer ingredients, specifically chitooligosaccharides, to gain molecular insights down to the atomic level. The results are intriguing, with a strong binding of the chitooligosaccharide polymer with the drug target, revealing 10 hydrogen bonds between the protein and polymer. Overall, the computational analysis supported the experimentally demonstrated strong binding of chitooligosaccharides to the drug target.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22157990DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8347687PMC
July 2021

Guaianolide sesquiterpenes and benzoate esters from the aerial parts of Siegesbeckia orientalis L. and their xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity.

Phytochemistry 2021 Oct 27;190:112889. Epub 2021 Jul 27.

Institute of Marine Biochemistry, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Cau Giay, Hanoi, Viet Nam; Graduate University of Science and Technology, VAST, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Cau Giay, Hanoi, Viet Nam. Electronic address:

Five undescribed (four guaianolide sesquiterpenes and a benzoate ester derivative) and seven known compounds were isolated from the aerial parts of S. orientalis L. Their chemical structures were determined by extensive analysis of HR-ESI-MS and NMR spectroscopic methods. Absolute configurations were elucidated by experimental and TD-DFT calculated ECD spectra. Twelve isolated compounds exhibited potential xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity with IC values ranging from 0.76 ± 0.17 μM to 31.80 ± 0.97 μM. Molecular docking studies predicted that the binding energies of all isolated compounds with xanthine oxidase were lower than that of the positive control allopurinol. Benzyl 2-hydroxy-6-O-β-D-glucopyranosylbenzoate and benzyl 2-methoxy-6-O-β-D-glucopyranosylbenzoate displayed not only the best docking score but also the highest in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity with IC values of 0.76 ± 0.17 μM and 0.98 ± 0.26 μM, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2021.112889DOI Listing
October 2021

Anti-inflammatory norclerodane diterpenoids and tetrahydrophenanthrene from the leaves and stems of Dioscorea bulbifera.

Fitoterapia 2021 Sep 12;153:104965. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Institute of Marine Biochemistry, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Hanoi 10072, Viet Nam. Electronic address:

Chemical investigation of the leaves and stems of Dioscorea bulbifera resulted in isolation of 10 compounds, including three new norclerodane diterpenoids, diosbulbiferins A (1) and B (2) and diosbulbiferinoside A (3), and one new natural congener, diosbulbiferin C (4), along with one new tetrahydrophenanthrene, diosbulbinone (8). Their structures were elucidated by comprehensive analyses of spectroscopic methods, including NMR and mass spectra. The absolute configurations of compounds 1-3 and 8 were deduced by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopic analyses. In addition, cytotoxic effects against MCF-7, HepG2, and SK-Mel-2 cancer cells and in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of the isolated compounds in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells were also reported.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fitote.2021.104965DOI Listing
September 2021

Cultivation of on new cheap monoxenic media without peptone.

J Nematol 2021 1;53. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.

The study of species biodiversity within the genus of nematodes would be facilitated by the isolation of as many species as possible. So far, over 50 species have been found, usually associated with decaying vegetation or soil samples, with many from Africa, South America and Southeast Asia. Scientists based in these regions can contribute to sampling and their proximity would allow intensive sampling, which would be useful for understanding the natural history of these species. However, severely limited research budgets are often a constraint for these local scientists. In this study, we aimed to find a more economical, alternative growth media to rear and related species. We tested 25 media permutations using cheaper substitutes for the reagents found in the standard nematode growth media (NGM) and found three media combinations that performed comparably to NGM with respect to the reproduction and longevity of . These new media should facilitate the isolation and characterization of and other free-living nematodes for the researchers in the poorer regions such as Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia where nematode diversity appears high.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21307/jofnem-2021-036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8040142PMC
April 2021

Global Impact of COVID-19 on Stroke Care and IV Thrombolysis.

Neurology 2021 06 25;96(23):e2824-e2838. Epub 2021 Mar 25.

Department of Neurology (R.G.N., M.H.M., M.Frankel, D.C.H.), Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center, Grady Memorial Hospital, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta; Department of Radiology (M.M.Q., M.A., T.N.N., A.K.) and Radiation Oncology (M.M.Q.), Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Massachusetts; Department of Neurology (S.O.M.), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre; Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (S.O.M.), Brazil; Department of Stroke Neurology (H. Yamagami), National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Japan; Department of Neurology (Z.Q.), Xinqiao Hospital of the Army Medical University, Chongqing, China; Department of Neurology (O.Y.M.), Stroke and Neurointervention Division, Alexandria University Hospital, Alexandria University, Egypt; Boston University School of Medicine (A.S.), Massachusetts; 2nd Department of Neurology (A.C.), Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland; Department of Neurology (G.T., L.P.), National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Attikon University Hospital, Athens, Greece; Faculdade de Medicina (D.A.d.S.), Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal; Department of Neurology (J.D., R.L.), Leuven University Hospital, Belgium; International Clinical Research Center and Department of Neurology (R.M.), St. Anne´s University Hospital in Brno and Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Department of Neurology (P.V.), Groeninge Hospital, Kortrijk; Department of Neurology (P.V.), University Hospitals Antwerp; Department of Translational Neuroscience (P.V.), University of Antwerp, Belgium; Department of Neurology (J.E.S., T.G.J.), Cooper Neurological Institute, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey; Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery (J. Kõrv), University of Tartu, Estonia; Department of Neurology (J.B., R.V.,S.R.), Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Illinois; Department of Neurosurgery (C.W.L.), Kaiser Permanente Fontana Medical Center; Department of Neurology (N.S.S.), Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center; Department of Neurology (A.M.Z., S.A.S.), UT Health McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas; Department of Neurology (A.L.Z.), Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; Department of Internal Medicine (G.N.), School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece; Department of Neurology (K.M., A.T.), Allegheny Health Network, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Neurology (A.L.), Ohio Health Riverside Methodist Hospital Columbus; Department of Medicine and Neurology (A.R.), University of Otago and Wellington Hospital, New Zealand; Department of Neurology (E.A.M.), Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Neurology (A.W.A., D. Alsbrook), University of Tennessee Health Center, Memphis; Department of Neurology (D.Y.H.), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Departments of Neurology (S.Y.) and Radiology (E.R.), New York University Grossman School of Medicine; Douala Gynaeco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital (E.G.B.L.), University of Douala, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Science, Cameroon; Ain Shams University Specialized Hospital (H.M.A., H.M.S., A.E., T.R.); Cairo University Affiliated MOH Network (F.H.); Department of Neurology (TM.), Nasser Institute for Research and Treatment, Cairo; Mansoura University Affiliated Private Hospitals Network (W.M.), Egypt; Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (F.S.S.), Kumasi, Ghana; Stroke Unit (T.O.A., K.W.), University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital; Neurology Unit (B.A.), Department of Medicine, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital; Department of Medicine (E.O.N.), Federal Medical Centre Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria; Neurology Unit (T.A.S.), Department of Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria; University College Hospital (J.Y.), Ibadan, Nigeria; The National Ribat University Affiliated Hospitals (H.H.M.), Khartoum, Sudan; Neurology Section (P.B.A.), Department of Internal Medicine, Aga-Khan University, Medical College East Africa, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Tunis El Manar University (A.D.R.), Military Hospital of Tunis; Department of Neurology (S.B.S.), Mongi Ben Hmida National Institute of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University Tunis El Manar, Tunisia; Department of Physiology (L.G.), Parirenyatwa Hospital, and Departments of Physiology and Medicine (G.W.N.), University of Zimbabwe, Harare; Department of Cerebrovascular/Endovascular Neurosurgery Division (D.S.), Erebouni Medical Center, Yerevan, Armenia; Department of Neurology (A.R.), Sir Salimulah College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Department of Neurology (Z.A.), Taihe Hospital of Shiyan City, Hubei; Department of Neurology (F.B.), Nanyang Central Hospital, Henan; Department of Neurology (Z.D.), Wuhan No. 1 Hospital, Hubei, China; Department of Neurology (Y. Hao.), Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine; Department of Neurology (W.H.), Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Maoming, Guangdong; Department of Neurology (G.Li.), Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong; Department of Neurology (W.L), The First Affiliated Hospital of Hainan Medical College; Department of Neurology (G.Liu.), Wuhan Central Hospital, Hubei; Department of Neurology (J.L.), Mianyang 404th Hospital, Sichuan; Department of Neurology (X.S.), Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Anhui; Department of Neurology and Neuroscience (Y.S.), Shenyang Brain Institute, Shenyang First People's Hospital, Shenyang Medical College Affiliated Brain Hospital; Department of Neurology (L.T.), Affiliated Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong; Department of Neurology (H.W.), Xiangyang Central Hospital, Hubei; Department of Neurology (B.W., Y.Yan), West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu; Department of Neurology (Z.Y.), Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Sichuan; Department of Neurology (H.Z.), Affiliated Hangzhou First People's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine; Department of Neurology (J.Z.), The First Affiliated Hospital of Shandong First Medical University; Department of Neurology (W.Z.), First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, China; Acute Stroke Unit (T.W.L.), The Prince of Wales Hospital, Kwok Tak Seng Centre for Stroke Research and Intervention, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; Interventional Neurology (C.C.), MAX Superspecialty Hospital, Saket, New Delhi; NH Institute of Neurosciences (V.H.), NH Mazumdar Shaw Medical Center, Bangalore; Department of Neurology (B.M.), Apollo Speciality Hospitals Nellore; Department of Neurology (J.D.P.), Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, Punjab; Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (P.N.S.), Kerala, India; Stroke Unit (F.S.U.), Pelni Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia; Neurosciences Research Center (M. Farhoudi, E.S.H.), Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; Beer Sheva Hospital (A.H.); Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Rambam Healthcare Campus, Haifa, Israel (A.R., R.S.H.); Departments of Neurology (N.O.) and Neurosurgery (N.S.), Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe; Department of Stroke and Neurovascular Surgery (D.W.), IMS Tokyo-Katsushika General Hospital; Yokohama Brain and Spine Center (R.Y.); Iwate Prefectural Central (R.D.); Department of Neurology and Stroke Treatment (N.T.), Japanese Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital; Department of Neurology (T.Y.), Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital; Department of Neurology (T.T.), Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Hospital; Department of Stroke Neurology (Y. Yazawa), Kohnan Hospital, Sendai; Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine (T.U.), Saga-Ken Medical Centre; Department of Neurology (T.D.), Saitama Medical Center, Kawagoe; Department of Neurology (H.S.), Nara City Hospital; Department of Neurology (Y.S.), Toyonaka Municipal Hospital, Osaka; Department of Neurology (F. Miyashita), Kagoshima City Hospital; Department of Neurology (H.F.), Japanese Red Cross Matsue Hospital, Shimane; Department of Neurology (K.M.), Shiroyama Hospital, Osaka; Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine (J.E.S.), Niigata City General Hospital; Department of Neurology (Y.S.), Sugimura Hospital, Kumamoto; Stroke Medicine (Y. Yagita), Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama; Department of Neurology (Y.T.), Osaka Red Cross Hospital; Department of Stroke Prevention and Treatment (Y.M.), Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki; Department of Neurology (S.Y.), Stroke Center and Neuroendovascular Therapy, Saiseikai Central Hospital, Tokyo; Department of Neurology (R.K.), Kin-ikyo Chuo Hospital, Hokkaido; Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine (T.K.), NTT Medical Center Tokyo; Department of Neurology and Neuroendovascular Treatment (H. Yamazaki), Yokohama Shintoshi Neurosurgical Hospital; Department of Neurology (M.S.), Osaka General Medical Center; Department of Neurology (K.T.), Osaka University Hospital; Department of Advanced Brain Research (N.Y.), Tokushima University Hospital Tokushima; Department of Neurology (K.S.), Saiseikai Fukuoka General Hospital, Fukuoka; Department of Neurology (T.Y.), Tane General Hospital, Osaka; Division of Stroke (H.H.), Department of Internal Medicine, Osaka Rosai Hospital; Department of Comprehensive Stroke (I.N.), Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan; Department of Neurology (A.K.), Asfendiyarov Kazakh National Medical University; Republican Center for eHealth (K.F.), Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kazakhstan; Department of Medicine (S.K.), Al-Farabi Kazakh National University; Kazakh-Russian Medical University (M.Z.), Kazakhstan; Department of Neurology (J.-H.B.), Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul; Department of Neurology (Y. Hwang), Kyungpook National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University; Ajou University Hospital (J.S.L.); Department of Neurology (S.B.L.), Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea; Department of Neurology (J.M.), National Medical Center, Seoul; Department of Neurology (H.P., S.I.S.), Keimyung University School of Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu; Department of Neurology (J.H.S.), Busan Paik Hospital, School of Medicine, Inje University, Busan; Department of Neurology (K.-D.S.), National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang; Asan Medical Center (C.J.Y.), Seoul, South Korea; Department of Neurology (R.A.), LAU Medical Center-Rizk Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon; Department of Medicine (W.A.W.Z., N.W.Y.), Pusat Perubatan Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur; Sultanah Nur Zahirah (Z.A.A., K.A.I.), Kuala Terengganu; University Putra Malaysia (H.b.B.); Sarawak General Hospital, Kuching (L.W.C.); Hospital Sultan Abdul Halim (A.B.I.), Sungai Petani Kedah; Hospital Seberang Jaya (I.L.), Pulau Pinang; Thomson Hospital Kota Damansara (W.Y.T.), Malaysia; "Nicolae Testemitanu" State University of Medicine and Pharmacy (S.G., P.L.), and Department of Neurology, Emergency Medicine Institute, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova; Department of Stroke Unit (A.M.A.H.), Royal Hospital Muscat, Oman; Neuroscience Institute (Y.Z.I., N.A.), Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; St. Luke's Medical Center-Institute of Neurosciences (M.C.P.-F., C.O.C.), Quezon City, Philippines; Endovascular Neurosurgery (D.K.), Saint-Petersburg Dzhanelidze Research Institute of Emergency Medicine, St. Petersburg, Russia; Department of Neurology (A.A.), Stroke Unit, King Saud University, College of Medicine, Riyadh; Department of Neurosurgery (H.A.-J.), Interventional Radiology, and Critical Care Medicine, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Imam Abdulrahman bin Faisal University, Saudi Arabia; Singapore National Neuroscience Institute (C.H.T.); Changi General Hospital (M.J.M.), Singapore; Neuroscience Center, Raffles Hospital (N.V.), Singapore; Department of Neurology (C.-H.C., S.-C.T.), National Taiwan University Hospital; Department of Radiology (A.C.), Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; Dicle University Medical School and Hospital (E.A.), Diyarbakir; Stroke and Neurointervention Unit (O.A., A.O.O.), Eskisehir Osmangazi University; Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine (S.G.), Turkey; Department of Neurology (S.I.H., S.J.), Neurological Institute at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Stroke Center (H.L.V., A.D.C.), Hue Central Hospital, Hue, Vietnam; Stroke Department (H.H.N., T.N.P.), Da Nang Hospital, Da Nang City; 115 People's Hospital (T.H.N., T.Q.N.), Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Department of Neurology (T.G., C.E.), Medical University of Graz; Department of Neurology (M. K.-O.), Research Institute of Neurointervention, University Hospital Salzburg/Paracelsus Medical University, Austria; Department of Neurology (F.B., A.D.), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Charleroi, Belgium; Department of Neurology (S.D.B., G.V.), Sint Jan Hospital, Bruges; Department of Neurology (S.D.R.), Brussels University Hospital (UZ Brussel); Department of Neurology (N.L.), ULB Erasme Hospitals Brussels; Department of Neurology (M.P.R.), Europe Hospitals Brussels; Department of Neurology (L.Y.), Antwerp University Hospital, Belgium; Neurology Clinic (F.A., T.S.), St. Anna University Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria; Department of Neurology (M.R.B.), Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb; Department of Neurology (H.B.), Sveti Duh University Hospital, Zagreb; Department of Neurology (I.C.), General Hospital Virovitica; Department of Neurology (Z.H.), General Hospital Zabok; Department of Radiology (F. Pfeifer), University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Croatia; Regional Hospital Karlovy Vary (I.K.); Masaryk Hospital Usti nad Labem (D.C.); Military University Hospital Praha (M. Sramek); Oblastní Nemocnice Náchod (M. Skoda); Regional Hospital Pribram (H.H.); Municipal Hospital Ostrava (L.K.); Hospital Mlada Boleslav (M. Koutny); Hospital Vitkovice (D.V.); Hospital Jihlava (O.S.); General University Hospital Praha (J.F.); Hospital Litomysl (K.H.); Hospital České Budejovice (M.N.); Hospital Pisek (R.R.); Hospital Uherske Hradiste (P.P.); Hospital Prostejov (G.K.); Regional Hospital Chomutov (J.N.); Hospital Teplice (M.V.); Mining Hospital Karvina (H.B.); Thomayer Hospital Praha (D.H.); Hospital Blansko (D.T.); University Hospital Brno (R.J.); Regional Hospital Liberec (L.J.); Hospital Ceska Lipa (J.N.); Hospital Sokolov (A.N.); Regional Hospital Kolin (Z.T.); Hospital Trutnov (P. Fibrich); Hospital Trinec (H.S.); Department of Neurology (O.V.), University Hospital Ostrava, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; Bispebjerg Hospital (H.K.C.), University of Copenhagen; Stroke Center (H.K.I., T.C.T.), Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen; Aarhus University Hospital (C.Z.S.), Aarhus; Neurovascular Center, Zealand University Hospital, University of Copenhagen (T.W.), Roskilde, Denmark; Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery (R.V.), University of Tartu, Estonia; Neurology Clinic (K.G.-P.), West Tallinn Central Hospital; Center of Neurology (T.T.), East Tallinn Central Hospital, School of Natural Sciences and Health, Tallinn University; Internal Medicine Clinic (K.A.), Pärnu Hospital, Estonia; Université Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, Lille Neuroscience & Cognition (C.C., F.C.); Centre Hospitalier d'Arcachon (M.D.), Gujan-Mestras; Centre Hospitalier d'Agen (J.-M.F.); Neurologie Vasculaire (L.M.) and Neuroradiologie (O.E.), Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Pierre Wertheimer, Bron; Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Bordeaux (E.L., F.R.); Centre Hospitalier de Mont de Marsan (B.O.); Neurologie (R.P.), Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild; Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines University (F. Pico); Neuroradiologie Interventionelle (M.P.), Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild; Neuroradiologie Interventionelle (R.P.), Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, France; K. Eristavi National Center of Experimental and Clinical Surgery (T.G.), Tbilisi; Department of Neurosurgery (M. Khinikadze), New Vision University Hospital, Tbilisi; Vivamedi Medical Center (M. Khinikadze), Tbilisi; Pineo Medical Ecosystem (N.L.), Tbilisi; Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University (A.T.), Tbilisi, Georgia; Department of Neurology (S.N., P.A.R.), University Hospital Heidelberg; Department of Neurology (M. Rosenkranz), Albertinen Krankenhaus, Hamburg; Department of Neurology (H.S.), Elbe Klinken Stade, University Medical Center Göttingen; Department of Neurology (T.S.), University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden; Kristina Szabo (K.S.), Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University Heidelberg, Mannheim; Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurologie (G.T.), Kopf- und Neurozentrum, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany; Department of Internal Medicine (D.S.), School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa; Second Department of Neurology (O.K.), Stroke Unit, Metropolitan Hospital, Piraeus, Greece; University of Szeged (P.K.), Szeged; University of Pecs (L.S., G.T.), Hungary; Stroke Center (A.A.), IRCCS Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Negrar, Verona; Department of Neurology (F.B.), Ospedale San Paolo, Savona,; Institute of Neurology (P.C., G.F.), Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Rome; Interventional Neurovascular Unit (L.R.), Careggi University Hospital, Florence; Stroke Unit (D.S.), Azienda Socio Sanitaria Territoriale (ASST) di Lecco, Italy; Maastricht University Medical Center; Department of Neurology (M.U.), Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen; Department of Neurology (I.v.d.W.), Haaglanden Medical Center, the Hague, the Netherlands; Department of Neurology (E.S.K.), Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, General Practice, HELSAM, University of Oslo, Norway; Neurological Ward with Stroke Unit (W.B.), Specialist Hospital in Konskie, Gimnazjalna, Poland and Collegium Medicum, Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce, Poland; Neurological Ward with Stroke Unit (M.F.), District Hospital in Skarzysko-Kamienna; Department of Neurology (E.H.L.), Szpitala im T. Marciniaka in Wroclaw; 2nd Department of Neurology (M. Karlinski), Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw; Department of Neurology and Cerebrovascular Disorders (R.K., P.K.), Poznan University of Medical Sciences; 107th Military Hospital with Polyclinic (M.R.), Walcz; Department of Neurology (R.K.), St. Queen Jadwiga, Clinical Regional Hospital No. 2, Rzeszow; Department of Neurology (P.L.), Medical University of Lublin; 1st Department of Neurology (H.S.-J.), Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw; Department of Neurology and Stroke Unit (P.S.), Holy Spirit Specialist Hospital in Sandomierz, Collegium Medicum Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce; Copernicus PL (W.F.), Neurology and Stroke Department, Hospital M. Kopernik, Gdansk; Stroke Unit (M.W.), Neurological Department, Stanislaw Staszic University of Applied Sciences, Pila, Poland; Hospital São José (Patricia Ferreira), Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Lisboa Central, Lisbon; Stroke Unit (Paulo Ferreira, V.T.C.), Hospital Pedro Hispano, Matosinhos; Stroke Unit, Internal Medicine Department (L.F.), Neuroradiology Department, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de São João, Porto; Department of Neurology (J.P.M.), Hospital de Egas Moniz, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Ocidental, Lisbon, Portugal; Department of Neurosciences (T.P.e.M.), Hospital de Santa Maria-CHLN, North Lisbon University Hospital; Hospital São José (A.P.N.), Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Lisboa Central, Lisbon; Department of Neurology (M. Rodrigues), Hospital Garcia de Orta, Portugal; Department of Neurology (C.F.-P.), Transilvania University, Brasov, Romania; Department of Neurology (G.K., M. Mako), Faculty Hospital Trnava, Slovakia; Department of Neurology and Stroke Center (M.A.d.L., E.D.T.), Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid; Department of Neurology (J.F.A.), Hospital Clínico Universitario, Universidad de Valladolid; Department of Neurology (O.A.-M.), Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete; Department of Neurology (A.C.C.), Unidad de Ictus, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid; Department of Neurology (S.P.-S), Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena & Neurovascular Research Laboratory (J.M.), Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla-IbiS; Rio Hortega University Hospital (M.A.T.A.), University of Valladolid; Cerebrovascular Diseases (A.R.V.), Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain; Department of Neurology (M. Mazya), Karolinska University Hospital and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Interventional Neuroradiology (G.B.), University Hospitals of Geneva; Department of Interventional and Diagnostic Neuroradiology (A.B., M.-N.P.), Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Basel; Department of Neurology (U.F.), University of Bern; Department of Neuroradiology (J.G.), University of Bern; Department of Neuroscience (P.L.M., D.S.), Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland; Department of Stroke Medicine (S.B., J. Kwan), Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London; Department of Neurology (K.K.), Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom; Department of Neurology (A.B., A. Shuaib), University of Alberta, Edmonton; Department of Neurology (L.C., A. Shoamanesh), McMaster University, Hamilton; Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Hotchkiss Brain Institute (A.M.D., M.D.H.), University of Calgary; Department of Neurology (T.F., S.Y.), University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mackenzie Health (J.H., C.A.S.) Richmond Hill, Ontario; Department of Neurology (H.K.), Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto; Department of Neurology (A. Mackey), Hopital Enfant Jesus, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite Laval, Quebec City; Department of Neurology (A.P.), University of Toronto; Medicine (G.S.), St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Neurosciences (M.A.B.), Hospital Dr. Rafael A. Calderon Guardia, CCSS. San Jose, Costa Rica; Neurovascular Service (J.D.B.), Hospital General San Juan de Dios, Guatemala City; Department of Neurología (L.I.P.R.), Hospital General de Enfermedades, Instituto Guatemalteco de Seguridad Social, Guatemala City, Guatemala; Department of Neurology (F.G.-R.), University Hospital Jose Eleuterio Gonzalez, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Mexico; Pacífica Salud-Hospital Punta Pacífica (N.N.-E., A.B., R.K.), Panama; Department of Neurology, Radiology (M.A.), University of Kansas Medical Center; Department of Neurointerventional Neurosurgery (D. Altschul), The Valley Baptist Hospital, Ridgewood, New Jersey; Palmetto General Hospital (A.J.A.-O.), Tenet, Florida; Neurology (I.B., P.K.), University Hospital Newark, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey; Community Healthcare System (A.B.), Munster, Indiana; Department of Neurology (N.B., C.B.N.), California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco; Department of Neurology (C.B.), Mount Sinai South Nassau, New York; University of Toledo (A.C.), Ohio; Department of Neurology (S.C.), University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Neuroscience (S.A.C.), Inova Fairfax Hospital, Virginia; Department of Neurology (H.C.), Abington Jefferson Hospital, Pennsylvania; Department of Neurology (J.H.C.), Mount Sinai South Nassau, New York; Baptist Health Medical Center (S.D.), Little Rock, Arkansas; Department of Neurology (K.D.), HCA Houston Healthcare Clearlake, Texas; Department of Neurology (T.G.D., R.S.), Erlanger, Tennessee; Wilmington North Carolina (V.T.D.); Department of Vascular and Neurointerventional Services (R.E.), St. Louis University, Missouri; Department of Neurology (M.E.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Department of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Radiology (M.F., S.O.-G., N.R.), University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City; Department of Radiology (D.F.), Swedish Medical Center, Englewood, Colorado; Department of Radiology (D.G.), Neurosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Adventist Health Glendale Comprehensive Stroke Center (M.G.), Los Angeles, California; Wellstar Neuroscience Institute (R.G.), Marietta, Georgia; Department of Neurology (A.E.H.), University of Texas Rio Grande Valley-Valley Baptist Medical Center, Texas; Department of Neurology (J.H., B.V.), Lahey Hospital & Medical Center, Beth Israel Lahey Health, Burlington, Massachusetts; Department of Neurology (A.M.K.), Wayne State, Detroit, Michigan; HSHS St. John's Hospital (N.N.K.), Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield; Virginia Hospital Center (B.S.K.), Arlington; Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Weill-Cornell Medical College (D.O.K.), New York-Presbyterian Queens; Department of Neurology (V.H.L.), Ohio State University, Columbus; Department of Neurology (L.Y.L.), Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Vascular and Neurointerventional Services (G.L.), St. Louis University, Missouri; Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute (I.L., A.K.S.), Florida; Department of Neurology (H.L.L.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland; Department of Emergency Medicine (L.M., M.S.), Steward Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA; Vidant Medical Center (S.M.), Greenville, North Carolina; Department of Neurology (A.M.M., D.R.Y.) and Neurosurgery (D.R.Y.), University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Florida; Department of Neurology (H.M.), SUNY Upstate New York, Syracuse; Memorial Neuroscience Institute (B.P.M.), Pembroke Pines, Florida; Neurosciences (J.M., J.P.T.), Spectrum Health, Michigan State University College of Medicine, Grand Rapids, Michigan; Sutter Health (M.M.), Sacramento, California; Department of Neurology (J.G.M.), Maine Medical Center, Portland; Department of Neurology (S.S.M.), Bayhealth, Dover, Delaware; Department of Neurology and Pediatrics (F.N.), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; Department of Neurology (K.N.), University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock; Department of Radiology and Neurology (R.N.-W.), UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Ascension St. John Medical Center (R.H.R.), Tulsa, Oklahoma; Riverside Regional Medical Center (P.R.), Newport, Virginia; Department of Neurology (J.R.R., T.N.N.), Boston University School of Medicine, MA; Department of Neurology (A.R.), Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Department of Neurology (M.S.), University of Washington School Medicine, Seattle; Department of Neurology (B.S.), University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester; Department of Neurology (A.S.), CHI-Immanuel Neurological Institute, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska; Holy Cross Hospital (S.L.S.), Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Department of Neurology (V.S.), Interventional Neuroradiology, University of California in Los Angeles; Banner Desert Medical Center (M.T.), Mesa, Arizona; Hospital de Agudos Dr. Ignacio Privano (O.B., A.L.), Argentina; Institute for Neurological Research, FLENI (V.A.P.L.), Buenos Aires, Argentina; Hospital das Clinicas/São Paulo University (M.S.A., A.C.); Sumare State Hospital (F.B.C., L.V.), São Paulo; Hospital Vera Cruz (L.D.D.S.), Deus Campinas; Irmanandade Santa Casa de Porto Alegre (L.V.G.); Stroke Unit (F.O.L., F. Mont'alverne), Hospital Geral de Fortaleza; Stroke Unit (A.L.L., P.S.C.M.), Hospital Sao Jose, Joinville, Santa Catarina; Stroke Unit (R.T.M.), Neurology, Nossa Senhora da Conceição Hospital, Porto Alegre; Department of Neurology (D.L.M.C.), Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Porto Alegre; Department of Neurology (L.C.R.), Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal; Hospital Ana (V.F.C.), Hospital Juliane, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil; Vascular Neurology Unit (P.M.L., V.V.O.), Neurology Service, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Clínica Alemana, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago; Hospital Padre Hurtado (V.N., J.M.A.T.) Santiago, Chile; Fundación Valle del Lili (P.F.R.A.), Cali; Stroke Center (H.B.), Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá; Department of Neurology (A.B.C.-Q.), Hospital Departamental Universitario del Quindio San Juan de Dios, Armenia; Clinica Universitaria Colombia (C.E.R.O.), Bogotá; University Hospital of San Vicente Foundation (D.K.M.B.), Medellin; Barranquilla, Colombia (O.L.); Hospital Infantil Universitario de San Jose (M.R.P.), Bogota; Stroke Unit (L.F.D.-E.), Hospital de Clínicas, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Asunción; Neurology Service (D.E.D.M.F., A.C.V.), Hospital Central del Instituto de Prevision Social, Paraguay; Internal Medicine Service (A.J.Z.Z.), Hospital Central de Policia "Rigoberto Caballero", Paraguay; National Institute of Neurological Sciences of Lima Peru (D.M.B.I.); Hospital Edgardo Rebagliati Martins Lima-Peru (L.R.K.); Department of Neurology (B.C.), Royal Melbourne Hospital; Department of Neurology (G.J.H.), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and Medical School, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth; University of Melbourne (C.H., R.S.), Ballarat Health Service, Australia University of Melbourne; Department of Neurology (T.K.), Royal Adelaide Hospital; Department of Neurosurgery (A. Ma), Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney; Department of Neurology (R.T.M.), Mater Hospital, Brisbane; Department of Neurology (R.S.), Austin Health, Victoria; Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health (R.S.), Parkville, Melbourne, Australia; Greymouth Base Hospital (D.S.), New Zealand; Department of Neurology (T.Y.-H.W.), Christchurch Hospital, New Zealand; Department of Neurology (D.L.), University of California in Los Angeles; and Department of Neurology (O.O.Z.), Mercy Health Neurosciences, Toledo, Ohio.

Objective: To measure the global impact of COVID-19 pandemic on volumes of IV thrombolysis (IVT), IVT transfers, and stroke hospitalizations over 4 months at the height of the pandemic (March 1 to June 30, 2020) compared with 2 control 4-month periods.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, observational, retrospective study across 6 continents, 70 countries, and 457 stroke centers. Diagnoses were identified by their ICD-10 codes or classifications in stroke databases.

Results: There were 91,373 stroke admissions in the 4 months immediately before compared to 80,894 admissions during the pandemic months, representing an 11.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] -11.7 to -11.3, < 0.0001) decline. There were 13,334 IVT therapies in the 4 months preceding compared to 11,570 procedures during the pandemic, representing a 13.2% (95% CI -13.8 to -12.7, < 0.0001) drop. Interfacility IVT transfers decreased from 1,337 to 1,178, or an 11.9% decrease (95% CI -13.7 to -10.3, = 0.001). Recovery of stroke hospitalization volume (9.5%, 95% CI 9.2-9.8, < 0.0001) was noted over the 2 later (May, June) vs the 2 earlier (March, April) pandemic months. There was a 1.48% stroke rate across 119,967 COVID-19 hospitalizations. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection was noted in 3.3% (1,722/52,026) of all stroke admissions.

Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a global decline in the volume of stroke hospitalizations, IVT, and interfacility IVT transfers. Primary stroke centers and centers with higher COVID-19 inpatient volumes experienced steeper declines. Recovery of stroke hospitalization was noted in the later pandemic months.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000011885DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8205458PMC
June 2021

The Application of Sample Pooling for Mass Screening of SARS-CoV-2 in an Outbreak of COVID-19 in Vietnam.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2021 Jan 22. Epub 2021 Jan 22.

8Department of Health, Da Nang, Vietnam.

We sampled nasal-pharyngeal throat swabs from 96,123 asymptomatic individuals at risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and generated 22,290 pools at collection, each containing samples from two to seven individuals. We detected SARS-CoV-2 in 24 pools, and confirmed the infection in 32 individuals after resampling and testing of 104 samples from positive pools. We completed the testing within 14 days. We would have required 64 days to complete the screening for the same number of individuals if we had based our testing strategy on individual testing. There was no difference in cycle threshold (Ct) values of pooled and individual samples. Thus, compared with individual sample testing, our approach did not compromise PCR sensitivity, but saved 77% of the resources. The present strategy might be applicable in settings, where there are shortages of reagents and the disease prevalence is low, but the demand for testing is high.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.20-1583DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8045628PMC
January 2021

Identification of three novel mutations in PCNT in vietnamese patients with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II.

Genes Genomics 2021 02 18;43(2):115-121. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Cau Giay, Hanoi, 100000, Vietnam.

Background: Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders related to developmental disabilities occurring in the uterus and prolongs during all stages of life, resulting in short stature, facial deformities and abnormal brain.

Objective: To determine the exact cause of the disease in two Vietnamese patients priory diagnosed with PD by severe pre-and postnatal growth retardation with marked microcephaly and some bone abnormalities.

Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed for the two patients and mutations in genes related to PD were screened. Sanger sequencing was applied to examine the mutations in the patients of their families.

Results: Three novel mutations in the PCNT gene which have not been reported previously were identified in the two patients. Of which, two frameshift mutations (p.Thr479Profs*6 and p.Glu2742Alafs*8) were detected in patient I and one stop-gained mutation (p.Gln1907*) was detected in the patient II. These mutations may result in a truncated PCNT protein, leading to an inactivated PACT domain corresponding to residue His3138-Trp3216 of PCNT protein. Therefore, the three mutations may cause a deficiency of protein functional activity and result in the phenotypes of primordial dwarfism in the two patients.

Conclusions: Clinical presentations in combination with genetic analyses supported an accurate diagnosis of the two patients with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II). In addition, these results have important implications for prenatal genetic screening and genetic counseling for the families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13258-020-01032-5DOI Listing
February 2021

New 3,4diterpene and coumarin derivative from the leaves of Gagnep.

Nat Prod Res 2020 Nov 28:1-12. Epub 2020 Nov 28.

Institute of Marine Biochemistry, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Hanoi, Viet Nam.

Two new compounds named trigoflavidus A () and trigoflavidus B (), and eight known compounds, trigoflavidone (), heterophypene (), howpene C (), 3,4sonderianol (), trigonochinene C (), fraxidin (), isofraxidin (), and isofraxetin () were isolated from the leaves of Gagnep. by various chromatographic methods. Their chemical structures were elucidated via UV, IR, HR-ESI-MS and NMR spectroscopic methods and divided into two groups including six 3,4diterpenes (, -) and four coumarins (, -). Absolute configurations at stereocenters of compound were confirmed by comparison of its CD spectra with those of the TD-DFT calculations. At a concentration of 30 M, compounds - exhibited weak cytotoxic activity toward LU1, HepG2, MCF7, and SKMel2 human cell lines (cell viability all over 50%).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2020.1851225DOI Listing
November 2020

Characterization of a thermophilic cytochrome P450 of the CYP203A subfamily from Binh Chau hot spring in Vietnam.

FEBS Open Bio 2021 01 30;11(1):124-132. Epub 2020 Nov 30.

Department of Biochemistry, Saarland University, Saarbrucken, Germany.

Cytochromes P450 (CYPs or P450s) comprise a superfamily of heme-containing monooxygenases that are involved in a variety of biological processes. CYPs have broad utilities in industry, but most exhibit low thermostability, limiting their use on an industrial scale. Highly thermostable enzymes can be obtained from thermophiles in geothermal areas, including hot springs, offshore oil-producing wells and volcanoes. Here, we report the identification of a gene encoding for a thermophilic CYP from the Binh Chau hot spring metagenomic database, which was designated as P450-T2. The deduced amino acid sequence showed the highest identity of 73.15% with CYP203A1 of Rhodopseudomonas palustris, supporting that P450-T2 is a member of the CYP203A subfamily. Recombinant protein expression yielded 541 nm. The optimal temperature and pH of P450-T2 were 50 °C and 8.0, respectively. The half-life of P450-T2 was 50.2 min at 50 °C, and its melting temperature was 56.80 ± 0.08 °C. It was found to accept electrons from all tested redox partners systems, with BmCPR-Fdx2 being the most effective partner. Screening for putative substrates revealed binding of phenolic compounds, such as l-mimosine and emodin, suggesting a potential application of this new thermophilic P450 in the production of the corresponding hydroxylated products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2211-5463.13033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7780096PMC
January 2021

Prognostic Role of Left Ventricular Systolic Function Measured by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Septic Shock.

Biomed Res Int 2020 21;2020:7927353. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Intensive Care Unit, Tam Anh General Hospital, Vietnam.

Background: Left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction is common in septic shock. Global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is a useful marker of intrinsic left ventricular systolic function. However, the association between left ventricular GLS and outcome in septic patients is not well understood. We performed this prospective study to investigate the prognostic value of LV systolic function utilizing speckle tracking echocardiography in patients with septic shock.

Methods: All the patients with septic shock based on sepsis-3 definition admitted to the intensive care unit were prospectively studied with STE within 24 hours after the onset of septic shock. Baseline clinical and echocardiographic variables were collected. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality.

Results: During a 19-month period, 90 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study. The in-hospital mortality rate was 43.3%. Compared with survivors, nonsurvivors exhibited significantly less negative GLS (-13.1 ± 3.3% versus -15.8 ± 2.9%; < 0.001), which reflected worse LV systolic function. The area under the ROC curves of GLS for the prediction of mortality was 0.76 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.87). Patients with GLS > -14.1% showed a significantly higher mortality rate (67.7% versus 15.6%; < 0.0001; log-rank = 23.3; < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, GLS (HR, 1.27; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.50, = 0.005) and SOFA scores (HR, 1.27; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.50, = 0.004) were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality.

Conclusions: Our study indicated that LV systolic function measured by STE might be associated with mortality in patients with septic shock.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/7927353DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7603548PMC
May 2021

Stimulation of dendritic cell functional maturation by capsid protein from chikungunya virus.

Iran J Basic Med Sci 2020 Oct;23(10):1268-1274

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Cau Giay, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Objectives: Chikungunya virus (ChikV) infection is characterized by persistent infection in joints and lymphoid organs. The ChikV Capsid protein plays an important role in regulating virus replication. In this study, we hypothesized that capsid protein may stimulate dendritic cell (DC) activation and maturation and trigger an inflammatory response in mice.

Materials And Methods: Mice were intraperitoneally injected with capsid protein and examined for changes in immunophenotype in lymph nodes (LNs). Next, DCs were treated with capsid protein or LPS and then expression of maturation markers, cytokine production, and ability to stimulate CD4 T cells in allo-MLR were analyzed.

Results: Injection of mice with capsid protein led to recruitment of myeloid cells and increased activation of T lymphocytes in LNs. Importantly, treatment of DCs with capsid protein prolonged the activation of IKB-α and up-regulated the number of CD11cCD86DCs and release of TNF-α and IL-12p70 as well as reducing DC apoptosis, all effects were abolished in the presence of Bay 11-7082. In addition, IL-2 production was higher by CD4 T cells stimulated with capsid-treated as compared with LPS-induced DCs.

Conclusion: The observations revealed that capsid protein participates in the regulation of NF-κB signaling and maturation of DCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.22038/IJBMS.2020.40386.9558DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7585544PMC
October 2020

Whole Exome Sequencing as a Diagnostic Tool for Unidentified Muscular Dystrophy in a Vietnamese Family.

Diagnostics (Basel) 2020 Sep 24;10(10). Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Graduate University of Science and Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet str., Cau Giay, Hanoi 100000, Vietnam.

Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous clinical and genetic disorders. Two siblings presented with characteristics like muscular dystrophy, abnormal white matter, and elevated serum creatine kinase level. The high throughput of whole exome sequencing (WES) makes it an efficient tool for obtaining a precise diagnosis without the need for immunohistochemistry. WES was performed in the two siblings and their parents, followed by prioritization of variants and validation by Sanger sequencing. Very rare variants with moderate to high predicted impact in genes associated with neuromuscular disorders were selected. We identified two pathogenic missense variants, c.778C>T (p.H260Y) and c.2987G>A (p.C996Y), in the gene (NM_000426.3), in the homozygous state in two siblings, and in the heterozygous state in their unaffected parents, which were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Variant c.2987G>A has not been reported previously. These variants may lead to a change in the structure and function of laminin-α2, a member of the family of laminin-211, which is an extracellular matrix protein that functions to stabilize the basement membrane of muscle fibers during contractions. Overall, WES enabled an accurate diagnosis of both patients with -related muscular dystrophy and expanded the spectrum of missense variants in .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10100741DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7598670PMC
September 2020

Regulation of cell activation by A20 through STAT signaling in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

J Recept Signal Transduct Res 2021 Aug 18;41(4):331-338. Epub 2020 Aug 18.

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the hematologic malignancy characterized by the aberrant proliferation of immature lymphoid cells. A20 is a deubiquitinase gene that inhibits functional activation of immune cells mediated through NF-κB/STAT pathways and frequently found inactivated in lymphoma. IL-6 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine secreted by immune cells under the pathogenic conditions and regulated by STAT signaling. Little is known about the role of A20 in regulating the function of ALL blasts and underlying molecular mechanisms. The present study, therefore, explored whether A20 expression contributes to IL-6 induced cell migration and activation of myeloid cells in ALL. To this end, blood samples of thirty-five adult ALL patients were examined. Gene expression profile was determined by quantitative RT-PCR, immunophenotype by flow cytometry, secretion of inflammatory cytokines by ELISA, and cell migration by a transwell migration assay. As a result, the expression of A20 was inactivated in ALL. Immunophenotypic analysis indicated that percent of CD11bCD40 expressing cells present in ALL was significantly reduced when transfected with PEM-T easy A20. Importantly, IL6-induced CXCL12-mediated migration of ALL blasts was dependent on the presence of A20. The inhibitory effects of A20 on activated myeloid cells and migration of ALL blasts were mediated through the STAT pathway upon IL-6 challenge. In addition, the CA-125 level was much higher in elderly females than either young female or male ALL patients or healthy donors. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of A20 on activation of ALL blasts are expected to affect the immune response to treatment for adult ALL patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10799893.2020.1808678DOI Listing
August 2021

Semixup: In- and Out-of-Manifold Regularization for Deep Semi-Supervised Knee Osteoarthritis Severity Grading From Plain Radiographs.

IEEE Trans Med Imaging 2020 12 30;39(12):4346-4356. Epub 2020 Nov 30.

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the highest disability factors in the world. This musculoskeletal disorder is assessed from clinical symptoms, and typically confirmed via radiographic assessment. This visual assessment done by a radiologist requires experience, and suffers from moderate to high inter-observer variability. The recent literature has shown that deep learning methods can reliably perform the OA severity assessment according to the gold standard Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system. However, these methods require large amounts of labeled data, which are costly to obtain. In this study, we propose the Semixup algorithm, a semi-supervised learning (SSL) approach to leverage unlabeled data. Semixup relies on consistency regularization using in- and out-of-manifold samples, together with interpolated consistency. On an independent test set, our method significantly outperformed other state-of-the-art SSL methods in most cases. Finally, when compared to a well-tuned fully supervised baseline that yielded a balanced accuracy (BA) of 70.9 ± 0.8% on the test set, Semixup had comparable performance - BA of 71 ± 0.8% ( p=0.368 ) while requiring 6 times less labeled data. These results show that our proposed SSL method allows building fully automatic OA severity assessment tools with datasets that are available outside research settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TMI.2020.3017007DOI Listing
December 2020

Late-Onset Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency and Variable Phenotypes in Vietnamese Females With Mutations.

Front Pediatr 2020 23;8:321. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Hanoi, Vietnam.

Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is an X- linked recessive disorder and the most common error of the urea cycle, caused by the mutations in the gene. Due to X-inactivation, 15-20% of female carriers present symptoms of OTCD at late onset. Early diagnosis of OTCD by molecular analysis in females is highly desirable. The aim of the study was to identify the mutations in two unrelated Vietnamese girls suspected with OTCD and the carriers in their families for definitive diagnosis and proper counseling. Two patients presented with an acute encephalopathy at the first admission. Biochemical tests revealed hyperammonemia, hyperlactatemia, elevated glutamine level, elevated transaminase, elevated urinary orotic and uracil acid levels, and disorder of prothrombin time. Brain magnetic resonance imaging indicated cerebral edema. Based on the clinical and laboratory results, the two patients were diagnosed with urea cycle disorders. Therefore, the two patients were managed by stopping feeding, with infused glucose, l-carnitine, l-arginine, and sodium benzoate, and with hemofiltration. The two patients were alert and recovered with normal blood ammonia levels after 72 h of treatment. The family history of patient 1 showed that her brother died at 4 days of age due to a coma and dyspnea, while her parents were asymptomatic. Variable phenotypes were observed in three generations of the patient 2's family, including asymptomatic (mother), affected female adults dying at the first symptom (grandmother and aunt), and affected males dying in the first week of life (uncle, cousin, and siblings). Whole-exome sequencing showed two mutations in the gene, including one novel missense mutation, c.365A>T, in the patient 1 and one previously reported splicing mutation, c.717+1G>A, in the patient 2. The two mutations are evaluated as likely pathogenic and pathogenic, respectively, according to the recommendations of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). Genetic analyses in the families indicated the mothers were heterozygous. Clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings accurately diagnosed the two patients with late-onset OTCD. Our results explained the genetic causes and proposed the risk in the patients' families, which could be useful for genetic counseling and monitoring in prenatal diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.00321DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7390877PMC
July 2020

Two new norlignans from the aerial parts of (Blume) Merr.

Nat Prod Res 2022 Jan 5;36(1):157-164. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

Institute of Marine Biochemistry, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Hanoi, Vietnam.

Two new norlignans, pouzolignan N () and pouzolignan O (), together with five known norlignans, pouzolignan F (), pouzolignan G (), pouzolignan H (), pouzolignan L (), and gnetifolin F () were isolated from the aerial parts of (Blume) Merr. Their chemical structures were elucidated via HR-ESI-MS and NMR spectroscopic methods. Absolute configurations at stereocenters were confirmed by comparisons of CD spectra with those of TD-DFT calculations. Compounds - exhibited chemical structures unique to species. At a concentration of 30 µM, compounds - exhibited weak cytotoxic activity toward CAL27 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines (cell viability from 65.3 ± 0.86 to 98.8 ± 1.23%). They also inhibited anoctamin-1 activity with inhibitory rates from 8.1 ± 0.87 to 24.3 ± 1.41%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2020.1771707DOI Listing
January 2022

De novo Mutations in Vietnamese Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2020 Feb 14;56(2). Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet str., Cau Giay, Hanoi 100000, Vietnam.

Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a rare congenital genetic disease causing abnormal unique facial phenotypes, several defects in organs and body parts, and mental disorder or intellectual disorder traits. Main causes of CdLS have been reported as variants in cohesin complex genes, in which mutations in the gene have been estimated to account for up to 80%. Our study included three Vietnamese patients with typical CdLS phenotypes. Whole exome sequencing revealed two known heterozygous mutations c.6697G>A (p.Val2233Met) and c.2602C>T (p.Arg868X), and a novel heterozygous mutation c.4504delG (p.Val1502fsX87) in the gene of the three patients. In silico analyses of the identified mutations predicted possible damaging and truncating effects on the NIPBL protein. Inherited analyses in the patients' families showed that all of the mutations are de novo. Our results lead a definitive diagnosis of patients with CdLS and expand the spectrum of mutations in the gene. These findings also confirm whole exome sequencing is an efficient tool for genetic screening of CdLS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina56020076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7073647PMC
February 2020

Chemical constituents from and their cytotoxic activity.

Nat Prod Res 2021 Oct 12;35(20):3360-3369. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

Institute of Marine Biochemistry, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Hanoi, Vietnam.

Extensive phytochemical investigation of leaves resulted in the isolation of six highly oxygenated nortriterpenoids () and five lignans () including a new pre-schisanartane-type, schisandrathera A (), a new dibenzocyclooctadiene glycoside, schisandrathera B () and two new lignans, schisandrathera C () and schisandrathera D (). Their chemical structures including absolute configurations were determined extensively by means of HR-ESI-MS, NMR, and ECD spectra. In addition, all isolated compounds were tested for cytotoxic activity against PC3 (prostate cancer) and MCF7 (breast cancer) cell lines. Among these compounds, schirubrisin B () showed strong cytotoxic effect on both PC3 and MCF7 cell lines with IC values of 3.21 ± 0.68, 13.30 ± 0.68 μM, respectively, whereas ten remaining compounds were found to be less effective in the investigated models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2019.1700247DOI Listing
October 2021

Regulation of dendritic cell function by A20 through high glucose-induced Akt2 signaling.

J Recept Signal Transduct Res 2019 Oct-Dec;39(5-6):434-441. Epub 2019 Nov 22.

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam.

A20 is a negative regulator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent inflammatory reaction in response to different stimuli by immune cells including dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells involved in both the innate and adaptive immune response. Dendritic cells use glucose as carbon source to synthesize fatty acid and generate energy. Glucose enhances cell apoptosis mediated through PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2, and Bax/Bcl-2 pathways. The protein kinase Akt2/PKBβ is expressed in DCs and a regulator of Ca2 influx, Na/H exchanger activity, and migration of DCs. This study explored whether regulation of high glucose-induced DC function through Akt2 signaling is influenced by overexpression of A20. To this end, A20 protein expression was determined by western blotting and immunoprecipitation, secretion of inflammatory cytokines by ELISA, and expression of apoptotic markers by flow cytometry. As a result, treatment of mice with 10% high glucose enriched water increased secretion of insulin/IGF1 and reduced A20 protein level, the effects were blunted in mice. Incubation of DCs with high glucose significantly decreased A20 protein expression in both control and -silenced DCs, but not in DCs. Importantly, treatment of DCs with high glucose increased ceramide synthesis, caspase 8 activity, and annexin V binding in control DCs, the effects were abolished in DCs or by A20 overexpression. In conclusion, regulation of A20 sensitive DC function by high glucose is mediated through insulin/IGF-1/Akt2 signaling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10799893.2019.1690511DOI Listing
June 2020

Whole exome sequencing revealed a pathogenic variant in a gene related to malignant hyperthermia in a Vietnamese cardiac surgical patient: A case report.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2019 Dec 6;48:88-90. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vietnam National University Hanoi, 144 Xuan Thuy Street, Cau Giay, Hanoi, Viet Nam.

Introduction: Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a rare autosomal dominant pharmacogenetic disorder which known associated with some genes such as and . Using whole exome analysis, we aimed to find out the genetic variant data in a malignant hyperthermia patient undergoing cardiac surgery.

Presentation Of Case: Patient was 59 years old male with dull left chest pain, mild breathing difficulty, thrombosis in the left atrium, mitral valve stenosis that needed a surgery to remove the thrombus and replace the mitral valve. After 5-h operation of left mitral heart valve replacement using both intravenous and inhaled anaesthetics, the patient showed suddenly hyperthermia (39.5 °C), low blood pressure (90/50 mmHg), heavy sweating, 1 mm dilated pupils on both sides, positive light reflection. Whole exome analysis showed 96,286 of SNPs including 11,705 of synonymous variants, 11,388 of missense variants, 106 of stop gained, and 39 of stop lost. One variant of gene was found as mutation point at c.7048G > A (p.Ala2350Thr) known related to MH.

Discussion: This was a rare case of MH during cardiac surgery reported in Vietnam that might related to mutation point at c.7048G > A (p.Ala2350Thr) of gene.

Conclusion: Patient carried a mutant of gene could possibly lead to MH development post anaesthesia of cardiac surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2019.10.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6849130PMC
December 2019

Strain-Hardening and High-Ductile Behavior of Alkali-Activated Slag-Based Composites with Added Zirconia Silica Fume.

Materials (Basel) 2019 Oct 27;12(21). Epub 2019 Oct 27.

School of Architecture, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186, Korea.

This paper presents an experimental study on the effects of zirconia silica fume on the composite properties and cracking patterns of fiber-reinforced alkali-activated slag-based composites. Four mixtures were prepared with added zirconia silica fume and varying water-to-binder ratio. Polyethylene fiber was used as a reinforcing fiber for all the mixtures at a volumetric ratio of 2.0% cubic specimens and uniaxial tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate their density, compressive strength, and tensile behavior. The test results demonstrated that the compressive strength, tensile strength, and tensile strain capacity of the composite can be simultaneously improved by incorporating zirconia silica fume. A mixture incorporating zirconia silica fume showed high-ductile behavior of 26.5% higher tensile strength, and 13.7% higher tensile strain capacity than the mixture without zirconia silica fume. The composite with added zirconia silica fume also showed excellent cracking patterns, i.e., narrow crack spacing and crack width.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma12213523DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6862578PMC
October 2019

Isolation of female germline stem cells from porcine ovarian tissue and differentiation into oocyte-like cells.

J Reprod Dev 2019 Oct 4;65(5):423-432. Epub 2019 Aug 4.

Cellular Reprogramming Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, International University, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam.

Historically, it had been widely accepted that the female mammalian ovary contained a limited number of oocytes that would reduce over time, without the possibility of replenishment. However, recent studies have suggested that female germline stem cells (FGSCs) could replenish the oocyte-pool in adults. The aim of this study was to isolate FGSCs from porcine ovaries and differentiate them into oocyte-like cells (OLCs). The FGSCs were successfully isolated from porcine ovarian tissue and cultured in vitro, in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with growth factors (EGF, FGF, GDNF, etc.) and a supplement (N21). These cells possessed spherical morphology and expressed specific germline characteristics (Vasa, Stella, Oct4, c-kit). By evaluating different conditions for in vitro differentiation of FGSCs, co-culturing the isolated FGSCs with MEF cells, under three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures, were shown to be optimal. FGSCs could successfully be differentiated into OLCs and reached about 70 µm in diameter, with a large number of surrounding somatic cells. Importantly, OLCs contained large nuclei, about 25-30 µm, with filamentous chromatin, similar to oocyte morphology, and expressed oocyte-specific markers (Gdf9, Zp2, SCP3, etc.) at the same level as oocytes. In conclusion, we successfully isolated FGSCs from porcine ovarian tissue and differentiated them into oocyte-like cells. This will provide a valuable model for studying a new, alternative source of oocytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.2019-050DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6815736PMC
October 2019

The Role of p.Ser1105Ser (in Gene) and p.Arg548Leu (in Gene) with Disease Status of Vietnamese Patients with Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome: Benign or Pathogenic?

Medicina (Kaunas) 2019 Apr 12;55(4). Epub 2019 Apr 12.

L'Hôpital Français de Hanoi, Ministry of Health, 1, Phuong Mai str., Dongda, Hanoi 100000, Vietnam.

: Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS), a genetic disease caused by mutations in genes on autosomes, usually occurs in the first three months after birth. A number of genetic mutations in genes, which encode for the components of the glomerular filtration barrier have been identified. We investigated mutations in , , , and genes that relate to the disease in Vietnamese patients. : We performed genetic analysis of two unrelated patients, who were diagnosed with CNS in the Vietnam National Children's Hospital with different disease status. The entire coding region and adjacent splice sites of these genes were amplified and sequenced using the Sanger method. The sequencing data were analyzed and compared with the and gene sequences published in Ensembl (ENSG00000161270, ENSG00000116218, ENSG00000138193, and ENSG00000184937, respectively) using BioEdit software to detect mutations. : We detected a new variant p.Ser607Arg and two other (p.Glu117Lys and p.Ser1105Ser) in the gene, as well as two variants (p.Arg548Leu, p.Pro1575Arg) in the gene. No mutations were detected in the and genes. Patient 1, who presented a heterozygous genotype of p.Ser1105Ser and p.Arg548Leu had a mild disease status but patient 2, who presented a homozygous genotype of these alleles, had a severe phenotype. : These results suggest that variants p.Ser1105Ser (in gene) and p.Arg548Leu (in gene) in the homozygous form might play a role in the development of the disease in patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina55040102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6524047PMC
April 2019

Regulation of p38MAPK-mediated dendritic cell functions by the deubiquitylase otubain 1.

HLA 2019 06 4;93(6):462-470. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that represent the essential link between innate and acquired immunity. Otubain (OTUB) 1 is shown to deubiquitinate TRAFs to suppress virus-induced inflammatory response. MAPK, a downstream molecule of TRAFs, is involved in regulating LPS-induced immune reactions and its activation is sensitive to the presence of OTUB1. Little is known about contributions of OTUB1 to changes in biological properties of DCs. The present study, therefore, explored whether DC functions are influenced by OTUB1. To this end, DCs were isolated and cultured with GM-CSF to attain bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) and followed by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of OTUB1 siRNA. Expression of markers of cellular maturation and proliferation were analyzed by flow cytometry, and secretion of inflammatory cytokines and ability to stimulate CD4 T-cells in allogenic mixed leukocyte reaction (allo-MLR) by ELISA, cell migration by a transwell migration assay and phagocytic capacity by FITC-dextran uptake measurement. As a result, treatment of the cells with OTUB1 siRNA prolonged activation of p38MAPK, increased CD54 expression and IL-6 release and reduced FITC-dextran uptake. Moreover, cytokine release produced from CD4 T-cells in allo-MLR was different. The enhanced level of IFN-γ, but not other cytokine production was observed in the presence of siRNA OTUB1. All the effects were completely abolished when the cells were exposed with p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580. In conclusion, OTUB1 prevents the prolonged activation of p38MAPK, which in turn compromises DC functions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tan.13534DOI Listing
June 2019
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