Publications by authors named "Ngolui Rene Fuanta"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Slow-Binding Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase by Manzamine Alkaloids.

Biochemistry 2018 08 31;57(32):4923-4933. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Department of Drug Discovery and Development, Harrison School of Pharmacy , Auburn University , 4306 Walker Building , Auburn , Alabama 36849 , United States.

Tuberculosis represents a significant public health crisis. There is an urgent need for novel molecular scaffolds against this pathogen. We screened a small library of marine-derived compounds against shikimate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( MtSK), a promising target for antitubercular drug development. Six manzamines previously shown to be active against M. tuberculosis were characterized as MtSK inhibitors: manzamine A (1), 8-hydroxymanzamine A (2), manzamine E (3), manzamine F (4), 6-deoxymanzamine X (5), and 6-cyclohexamidomanzamine A (6). All six showed mixed noncompetitive inhibition of MtSK. The lowest K values were obtained for 6 across all MtSK-substrate complexes. Time-dependent analyses revealed two-step, slow-binding inhibition. The behavior of 1 was typical; initial formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex (EI) obeyed an apparent K of ∼30 μM with forward ( k) and reverse ( k) rate constants for isomerization to an EI* complex of 0.18 and 0.08 min, respectively. In contrast, 6 showed a lower K for the initial encounter complex (∼1.5 μM), substantially faster isomerization to EI* ( k = 0.91 min), and slower back conversion of EI* to EI ( k = 0.04 min). Thus, the overall inhibition constants, K*, for 1 and 6 were 10 and 0.06 μM, respectively. These findings were consistent with docking predictions of a favorable binding mode and a second, less tightly bound pose for 6 at MtSK. Our results suggest that manzamines, in particular 6, constitute a new scaffold from which drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action could be designed for the treatment of tuberculosis by targeting MtSK.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.biochem.8b00231DOI Listing
August 2018

Mechanism of irreversible inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase by ilimaquinone.

Biochim Biophys Acta Proteins Proteom 2018 May - Jun;1866(5-6):731-739. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Department of Drug Discovery and Development, Harrison School of Pharmacy, 3306 Walker Building, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA. Electronic address:

Ilimaquinone (IQ), a marine sponge metabolite, has been considered as a potential therapeutic agent for various diseases due to its broad range of biological activities. We show that IQ irreversibly inactivates Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase (MtSK) through covalent modification of the protein. Inactivation occurred with an apparent second-order rate constant of about 60 M s. Following reaction with IQ, LC-MS analyses of intact MtSK revealed covalent modification of MtSK by IQ, with the concomitant loss of a methoxy group, suggesting a Michael-addition mechanism. Evaluation of tryptic fragments of IQ-derivatized MtSK by MS/MS demonstrated that Ser and Thr residues were most frequently modified with lesser involvement of Lys and Tyr. In or near the MtSK active site, three residues of the P-loop (K15, S16, and T17) as well as S77, T111, and S44 showed evidence of IQ-dependent derivatization. Accordingly, inclusion of ATP in IQ reactions with MtSK partially protected the enzyme from inactivation and limited IQ-based derivatization of K15 and S16. Additionally, molecular docking models for MtSK-IQ were generated for IQ-derivatized S77 and T111. In the latter, ATP was observed to sterically clash with the IQ moiety. Out of three other enzymes evaluated, lactate dehydrogenase was derivatized and inactivated by IQ, but pyruvate kinase and catalase-peroxidase (KatG) were unaffected. Together, these data suggest that IQ is promiscuous (though not entirely indiscriminant) in its reactivity. As such, the potential of IQ as a lead in the development of antitubercular agents directed against MtSK or other targets is questionable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbapap.2018.04.007DOI Listing
July 2018

A multifaceted approach to identify non-specific enzyme inhibition: Application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2018 02 5;28(4):802-808. Epub 2017 Dec 5.

Department of Drug Discovery and Development, Harrison School of Pharmacy, 4306 Walker Building, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA. Electronic address:

Single dose high-throughput screening (HTS) followed by dose-response evaluations is a common strategy for the identification of initial hits for further development. Early identification and exclusion of false positives is a cost-saving and essential step in early drug discovery. One of the mechanisms of false positive compounds is the formation of aggregates in assays. This study evaluates the mechanism(s) of inhibition of a set of 14 compounds identified previously as actives in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) cell culture screening and in vitro actives in Mt shikimate kinase (MtSK) assay. Aggregation of hit compounds was characterized using multiple experimental methods, LC-MS, HNMR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and visual inspection after centrifugation for orthogonal confirmation. Our results suggest that the investigated compounds containing oxadiazole-amide and aminobenzothiazole moieties are false positive hits and non-specific inhibitors of MtSK through aggregate formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2017.12.002DOI Listing
February 2018

Plasmodium falciparum Thioredoxin Reductase (PfTrxR) and Its Role as a Target for New Antimalarial Discovery.

Molecules 2015 Jun 22;20(6):11459-73. Epub 2015 Jun 22.

Department of Drug Discovery and Development, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA.

The growing resistance to current antimalarial drugs is a major concern for global public health. The pressing need for new antimalarials has led to an increase in research focused on the Plasmodium parasites that cause human malaria. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), an enzyme needed to maintain redox equilibrium in Plasmodium species, is a promising target for new antimalarials. This review paper provides an overview of the structure and function of TrxR, discusses similarities and differences between the thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) of different Plasmodium species and the human forms of the enzyme, gives an overview of modeling Plasmodium infections in animals, and suggests the role of Trx functions in antimalarial drug resistance. TrxR of Plasmodium falciparum is a central focus of this paper since it is the only Plasmodium TrxR that has been crystallized and P. falciparum is the species that causes most malaria cases. It is anticipated that the information summarized here will give insight and stimulate new directions in which research might be most beneficial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules200611459DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6272602PMC
June 2015
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