Publications by authors named "Neus Solé-Morata"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ancient and modern mitogenomes from Central Argentina: new insights into population continuity, temporal depth and migration in South America.

Hum Mol Genet 2021 Apr 15. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades, Departamento de Antropología, Córdoba, Argentina.

The inverted triangle shape of South America places Argentina territory as a geographical crossroads between the two principal peopling streams that followed either the Pacific or the Atlantic coasts, which could have then merged in Central Argentina. Although the genetic diversity from this region is therefore crucial to decipher past population movements in South America, its characterization has been overlooked so far. We report 92 modern and 22 ancient mitogenomes spanning a temporal range of 5000 years, which were compared to a large set of previously reported data. Leveraging this dataset representative of the mitochondrial diversity of the subcontinent, we investigate the maternal history of Central Argentina populations within a wider geographical context. We describe a large number of novel clades within the mitochondrial DNA tree, thus providing new phylogenetic interpretations for South America. We also identify several local clades of great temporal depth with continuity until present that stem directly from the founder haplotypes, suggesting that they originated in the region and expanded from there. Moreover, the presence of lineages characteristic of other South American regions reveals the existence of gene flow to Central Argentina. Finally, we report some lineages with discontinuous distribution across the Americas, which suggest the persistence of relic lineages likely linked to the first population arrivals. The present study represents to date the most exhaustive attempt to elaborate a Native American genetic map from modern and ancient complete mitochondrial genomes in Argentina and provides relevant information about the general process of settlement in South America.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddab105DOI Listing
April 2021

Longitudinal Changes in Gambling, Buying and Materialism in Adolescents: A Population-Based Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 03 10;18(6). Epub 2021 Mar 10.

Ciber Fisiopatologia Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERobn), Instituto Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain.

Gambling disorder, gambling-related cognitive biases, compulsive buying, and materialistic values lead to impaired functioning in important areas of life. The aims of the present longitudinal study are (1) to evaluate the change produced after one year in those mentioned variables and (2) to examine the gender role in these changes and to analyze the mediational mechanisms among the variables of the study. The sample was composed of 182 adolescents (103 females and 79 males) from secondary education Spanish institutions who completed self-administered questionnaires. Structural equation modeling has been used to explore associations between the different variables. Our results show significant decreases in compulsive buying, materialism, and cognitive biases related to gambling after one year. Gambling disorder severity was directly related to cognitive distortions of gambling and being a man. Compulsive buying was associated with older age and the female gender. Materialism was associated with compulsive buying and the male gender. In conclusion, gambling disorder, gambling-related cognitive biases, compulsive buying, and materialistic values change over time in different ways, according to gender. The understanding of gambling disorder and compulsive buying in adolescents could potentially lead to early prevention and treatment programs for the specific needs of gender and age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062811DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8000979PMC
March 2021

People from Ibiza: an unexpected isolate in the Western Mediterranean.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 06 14;27(6):941-951. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Institute of Evolutionary Biology (CSIC-UPF), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.

In this study, we seek to understand and to correlate the genetic patterns observed in the population of the island of Ibiza in the Western Mediterranean basin with past events. Genome-wide genotypes of 189 samples representing 13 of 17 regions in Spain have been analyzed, in addition to 105 samples from the Levant, 157 samples from North Africa, and one ancient sample from the Phoenician Cas Molí site in Ibiza. Before the Catalans conquered the island in 1235 CE, Ibiza (Eivissa) had already been influenced by several cultures, starting with the Phoenicians, then the Carthaginians, followed by the Umayyads. The impact of these various cultures on the genetic structure of the islanders is still unexplored. Our results show a clear distinction between Ibiza and the rest of Spain. To investigate whether this was due to the Phoenician colonization or to more recent events, we compared the genomes of current Ibizans to that of an ancient Phoenician sample from Ibiza and to both modern Levantine and North African genomes. We did not identify any trace of Phoenician ancestry in the current Ibizans. Interestingly, the analysis of runs of homozygosity and changes in the effective population size through time support the idea that drift has shaped the genetic structure of current Ibizans. In addition to the small carrying capacity of the island, Ibiza experienced a series of dramatic demographic changes due to several instances of famine, war, malaria and plague that could have significantly contributed to its current genetic differentiation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-019-0361-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6777470PMC
June 2019

The genetic landscape of Mediterranean North African populations through complete mtDNA sequences.

Ann Hum Biol 2018 Feb;45(1):98-104

a Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Institute of Evolutionary Biology (CSIC-UPF) , Universitat Pompeu Fabra , Barcelona , Spain.

Background: The genetic composition of human North African populations is an amalgam of different ancestral components coming from the Middle East, Europe, south-Saharan Africa and autochthonous to North Africa. This complex genetic pattern is the result of migrations and admixtures in the region since Palaeolithic times.

Aims: The objective of the present study is to refine knowledge of the population history of North African populations through the analysis of complete mitochondrial sequences.

Subjects And Methods: This study has sequenced complete mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) in several North African and neighbouring individuals.

Results: The mtDNA haplogroup classification and phylogeny shows a high genetic diversity in the region as a result of continuous admixture. The phylogenetic analysis allowed us to identify a new haplogroup characterised by positions 10 101 C and 146 C (H1v2), a sub-branch of H1v, which is restricted to North Africa and whose origins are estimated as ∼4000 years ago.

Conclusions: The analysis of the complete mtDNA genome has allowed for the identification of a North African sub-lineage that might be ignored by the analysis of partial mtDNA control region sequences, highlighting the phylogeographic relevance of mtDNA complete sequence analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03014460.2017.1413133DOI Listing
February 2018

Whole Y-chromosome sequences reveal an extremely recent origin of the most common North African paternal lineage E-M183 (M81).

Sci Rep 2017 11 21;7(1):15941. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

Institute of Evolutionary Biology (CSIC-UPF), Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.

E-M183 (E-M81) is the most frequent paternal lineage in North Africa and thus it must be considered to explore past historical and demographical processes. Here, by using whole Y chromosome sequences from 32 North African individuals, we have identified five new branches within E-M183. The validation of these variants in more than 200 North African samples, from which we also have information of 13 Y-STRs, has revealed a strong resemblance among E-M183 Y-STR haplotypes that pointed to a rapid expansion of this haplogroup. Moreover, for the first time, by using both SNP and STR data, we have provided updated estimates of the times-to-the-most-recent-common-ancestor (TMRCA) for E-M183, which evidenced an extremely recent origin of this haplogroup (2,000-3,000 ya). Our results also showed a lack of population structure within the E-M183 branch, which could be explained by the recent and rapid expansion of this haplogroup. In spite of a reduction in STR heterozygosity towards the West, which would point to an origin in the Near East, ancient DNA evidence together with our TMRCA estimates point to a local origin of E-M183 in NW Africa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-16271-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5698413PMC
November 2017

Analysis of the R1b-DF27 haplogroup shows that a large fraction of Iberian Y-chromosome lineages originated recently in situ.

Sci Rep 2017 08 4;7(1):7341. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC-UPF), Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

Haplogroup R1b-M269 comprises most Western European Y chromosomes; of its main branches, R1b-DF27 is by far the least known, and it appears to be highly prevalent only in Iberia. We have genotyped 1072 R1b-DF27 chromosomes for six additional SNPs and 17 Y-STRs in population samples from Spain, Portugal and France in order to further characterize this lineage and, in particular, to ascertain the time and place where it originated, as well as its subsequent dynamics. We found that R1b-DF27 is present in frequencies ~40% in Iberian populations and up to 70% in Basques, but it drops quickly to 6-20% in France. Overall, the age of R1b-DF27 is estimated at ~4,200 years ago, at the transition between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age, when the Y chromosome landscape of W Europe was thoroughly remodeled. In spite of its high frequency in Basques, Y-STR internal diversity of R1b-DF27 is lower there, and results in more recent age estimates; NE Iberia is the most likely place of origin of DF27. Subhaplogroup frequencies within R1b-DF27 are geographically structured, and show domains that are reminiscent of the pre-Roman Celtic/Iberian division, or of the medieval Christian kingdoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-07710-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5544771PMC
August 2017

Length and repeat-sequence variation in 58 STRs and 94 SNPs in two Spanish populations.

Forensic Sci Int Genet 2017 09 16;30:66-70. Epub 2017 Jun 16.

Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (UPF-CSIC), Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address:

We have genotyped the 58 STRs (27 autosomal, 24 Y-STRs and 7 X-STRs) and 94 autosomal SNPs in Illumina ForenSeq™ Primer Mix A in 88 Spanish Roma (Gypsy) samples and 143 Catalans. Since this platform is based in massive parallel sequencing, we have used simple R scripts to uncover the sequence variation in the repeat region. Thus, we have found, across 58 STRs, 541 length-based alleles, which, after considering repeat-sequence variation, became 804 different alleles. All loci in both populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. F between both populations was 0.0178 for autosomal SNPs, 0.0146 for autosomal STRs, 0.0101 for X-STRs and 0.1866 for Y-STRs. Combined a priori statistics showed quite large; for instance, pooling all the autosomal loci, the a priori probabilities of discriminating a suspect become 1-(2.3×10) and 1-(5.9×10), for Roma and Catalans respectively, and the chances of excluding a false father in a trio are 1-(2.6×10) and 1-(2.0×10).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2017.06.006DOI Listing
September 2017

Y-chromosome diversity in Catalan surname samples: insights into surname origin and frequency.

Eur J Hum Genet 2015 Nov 18;23(11):1549-57. Epub 2015 Feb 18.

Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Institute of Evolutionary Biology (CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, CEXS-UPF-PRBB, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

The biological behavior of the Y chromosome, which is paternally inherited, implies that males sharing the same surname may also share a similar Y chromosome. However, socio-cultural factors, such as polyphyletism, non-paternity, adoption, or matrilineal surname transmission, may prevent the joint transmission of the surname and the Y chromosome. By genotyping 17 Y-STRs and 68 SNPs in ~2500 male samples that each carried one of the 50 selected Catalan surnames, we could determine sets of descendants of a common ancestor, the population of origin of the common ancestor, and the date when such a common ancestor lived. Haplotype diversity was positively correlated with surname frequency, that is, rarer surnames showed the strongest signals of coancestry. Introgression rates of Y chromosomes into a surname by non-paternity, adoption, and transmission of the maternal surname were estimated at 1.5-2.6% per generation, with some local variation. Average ages for the founders of the surnames were estimated at ~500 years, suggesting a delay between the origin of surnames (twelfth and thirteenth centuries) and the systematization of their paternal transmission. We have found that, in general, a foreign etymology for a surname does not often result in a non-indigenous origin of surname founders; however, bearers of some surnames with an Arabic etymology show an excess of North African haplotypes. Finally, we estimate that surname prediction from a Y-chromosome haplotype, which may have interesting forensic applications, has a ~60% sensitivity but a 17% false discovery rate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejhg.2015.14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4613475PMC
November 2015

Recent radiation of R-M269 and high Y-STR haplotype resemblance confirmed.

Ann Hum Genet 2014 Jul 13;78(4):253-4. Epub 2014 May 13.

Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ahg.12066DOI Listing
July 2014