Publications by authors named "Neil E Caporaso"

236 Publications

A Robust Test for Additive Gene-Environment Interaction Under the Trend Effect of Genotype Using an Empirical Bayes-Type Shrinkage Estimator.

Am J Epidemiol 2021 May 2. Epub 2021 May 2.

Quantitative Sciences Unit, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Evaluating gene by environment (G$\times$E) interaction under an additive risk model (i.e. additive interaction) has gained wider attention. Recently, statistical tests have been proposed for detecting additive interaction that utilize an assumption on G-E independence to boost power, which do not rely on restrictive genetic models such as dominant or recessive models. However, a major limitation of these methods is a sharp increase in type I error when this assumption is violated. Our goal is to develop a robust test for additive G$\times$E interaction under the trend effect of genotype, applying an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator of the relative excess risk due to interaction. The proposed method uses a set of constraints to impose the trend effect of genotype and builds an estimator that data-adaptively shrinks a RERI estimator obtained under a general model for G-E dependence using a retrospective likelihood framework. Numerical study under varying levels of departures from G-E independence shows that the proposed method is robust against the violation of the independence assumption while providing an adequate balance between bias and efficiency compared to existing methods. We applied the proposed method to the genetic data of Alzheimer's disease and lung cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwab124DOI Listing
May 2021

Tracing Lung Cancer Risk Factors Through Mutational Signatures in Never-Smokers.

Am J Epidemiol 2021 06;190(6):962-976

Epidemiologic studies often rely on questionnaire data, exposure measurement tools, and/or biomarkers to identify risk factors and the underlying carcinogenic processes. An emerging and promising complementary approach to investigate cancer etiology is the study of somatic "mutational signatures" that endogenous and exogenous processes imprint on the cellular genome. These signatures can be identified from a complex web of somatic mutations thanks to advances in DNA sequencing technology and analytical algorithms. This approach is at the core of the Sherlock-Lung study (2018-ongoing), a retrospective case-only study of over 2,000 lung cancers in never-smokers (LCINS), using different patterns of mutations observed within LCINS tumors to trace back possible exposures or endogenous processes. Whole genome and transcriptome sequencing, genome-wide methylation, microbiome, and other analyses are integrated with data from histological and radiological imaging, lifestyle, demographic characteristics, environmental and occupational exposures, and medical records to classify LCINS into subtypes that could reveal distinct risk factors. To date, we have received samples and data from 1,370 LCINS cases from 17 study sites worldwide and whole-genome sequencing has been completed on 1,257 samples. Here, we present the Sherlock-Lung study design and analytical strategy, also illustrating some empirical challenges and the potential for this approach in future epidemiologic studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa234DOI Listing
June 2021

Natural history of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis among relatives in CLL families.

Blood 2021 Apr;137(15):2046-2056

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

Chronic lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) has one of the highest familial risks among cancers. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL), the precursor to CLL, has a higher prevalence (13%-18%) in families with 2 or more members with CLL compared with the general population (5%-12%). Although, the rate of progression to CLL for high-count MBLs (clonal B-cell count ≥500/µL) is ∼1% to 5%/y, no low-count MBLs have been reported to progress to date. We report the incidence and natural history of MBL in relatives from CLL families. In 310 CLL families, we screened 1045 relatives for MBL using highly sensitive flow cytometry and prospectively followed 449 of them. MBL incidence was directly age- and sex-adjusted to the 2010 US population. CLL cumulative incidence was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. At baseline, the prevalence of MBL was 22% (235/1045 relatives). After a median follow-up of 8.1 years among 449 relatives, 12 individuals progressed to CLL with a 5-year cumulative incidence of 1.8%. When considering just the 139 relatives with low-count MBL, the 5-year cumulative incidence increased to 5.7%. Finally, 264 had no MBL at baseline, of whom 60 individuals subsequently developed MBL (2 high-count and 58 low-count MBLs) with an age- and sex-adjusted incidence of 3.5% after a median of 6 years of follow-up. In a screening cohort of relatives from CLL families, we reported progression from normal-count to low-count MBL to high-count MBL to CLL, demonstrating that low-count MBL precedes progression to CLL. We estimated a 1.1% annual rate of progression from low-count MBL, which is in excess of that in the general population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2020006322DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8057266PMC
April 2021

Assessing Lung Cancer Absolute Risk Trajectory Based on a Polygenic Risk Model.

Cancer Res 2021 03 20;81(6):1607-1615. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Baylor Medical College, Houston, Texas.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death globally. An improved risk stratification strategy can increase efficiency of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening. Here we assessed whether individual's genetic background has clinical utility for risk stratification in the context of LDCT screening. On the basis of 13,119 patients with lung cancer and 10,008 controls with European ancestry in the International Lung Cancer Consortium, we constructed a polygenic risk score (PRS) via 10-fold cross-validation with regularized penalized regression. The performance of risk model integrating PRS, including calibration and ability to discriminate, was assessed using UK Biobank data ( = 335,931). Absolute risk was estimated on the basis of age-specific lung cancer incidence and all-cause mortality as competing risk. To evaluate its potential clinical utility, the PRS distribution was simulated in the National Lung Screening Trial ( = 50,772 participants). The lung cancer ORs for individuals at the top decile of the PRS distribution versus those at bottom 10% was 2.39 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.92-3.00; = 1.80 × 10] in the validation set ( = 5.26 × 10). The OR per SD of PRS increase was 1.26 (95% CI = 1.20-1.32; = 9.69 × 10) for overall lung cancer risk in the validation set. When considering absolute risks, individuals at different PRS deciles showed differential trajectories of 5-year and cumulative absolute risk. The age reaching the LDCT screening recommendation threshold can vary by 4 to 8 years, depending on the individual's genetic background, smoking status, and family history. Collectively, these results suggest that individual's genetic background may inform the optimal lung cancer LDCT screening strategy. SIGNIFICANCE: Three large-scale datasets reveal that, after accounting for risk factors, an individual's genetics can affect their lung cancer risk trajectory, thus may inform the optimal timing for LDCT screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-20-1237DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7969419PMC
March 2021

Association of objectively measured sleep with frailty and 5-year mortality in community-dwelling older adults.

Sleep 2021 Jul;44(7)

Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA.

Study Objectives: To determine whether actigraphy-measured sleep was independently associated with risk of frailty and mortality over a 5-year period among older adults.

Methods: We used data from Waves 2 (W2) and 3 (W3) (2010-2015) of the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project, a prospective cohort of community-dwelling older adults born between 1920 and 1947. One-third of W2 respondents were randomly selected to participate in a sleep study, of whom N = 727 consented and N = 615 were included in the analytic sample. Participants were instructed to wear a wrist actigraph for 72 h (2.93 ± 0.01 nights). Actigraphic sleep parameters were averaged across nights and included total sleep time, percent sleep, sleep fragmentation index, and wake after sleep onset. Subjective sleep was collected via questionnaire. Frailty was assessed using modified Fried Frailty Index. Vital status was ascertained at the time of the W3 interview. W3 frailty/mortality status was analyzed jointly with a four-level variable: robust, pre-frail, frail, and deceased. Associations were modeled per 10-unit increase.

Results: After controlling for baseline frailty (robust and pre-frail categories), age, sex, education, body mass index, and sleep time preference, a higher sleep fragmentation index was associated with frailty (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.02-2.84) and mortality (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.09-4.09). Greater wake after sleep onset (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02-1.50) and lower percent sleep (OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.17-0.97) were associated with mortality.

Conclusions: Among community-dwelling older adults, actigraphic sleep is associated with frailty and all-cause mortality over a 5-year period. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the physiological mechanisms underlying these associations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsab003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8271128PMC
July 2021

Expanding the genetic architecture of nicotine dependence and its shared genetics with multiple traits.

Nat Commun 2020 11 3;11(1):5562. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, 68159, Mannheim, Germany.

Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality. Genetic variation contributes to initiation, regular smoking, nicotine dependence, and cessation. We present a Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND)-based genome-wide association study in 58,000 European or African ancestry smokers. We observe five genome-wide significant loci, including previously unreported loci MAGI2/GNAI1 (rs2714700) and TENM2 (rs1862416), and extend loci reported for other smoking traits to nicotine dependence. Using the heaviness of smoking index from UK Biobank (N = 33,791), rs2714700 is consistently associated; rs1862416 is not associated, likely reflecting nicotine dependence features not captured by the heaviness of smoking index. Both variants influence nearby gene expression (rs2714700/MAGI2-AS3 in hippocampus; rs1862416/TENM2 in lung), and expression of genes spanning nicotine dependence-associated variants is enriched in cerebellum. Nicotine dependence (SNP-based heritability = 8.6%) is genetically correlated with 18 other smoking traits (r = 0.40-1.09) and co-morbidities. Our results highlight nicotine dependence-specific loci, emphasizing the FTND as a composite phenotype that expands genetic knowledge of smoking.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19265-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7642344PMC
November 2020

Lung cancer risk in painters: results from the SYNERGY pooled case-control study consortium.

Occup Environ Med 2021 04 28;78(4):269-278. Epub 2020 Oct 28.

Stony Brook Cancer Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA.

Objectives: We evaluated the risk of lung cancer associated with ever working as a painter, duration of employment and type of painter by histological subtype as well as joint effects with smoking, within the SYNERGY project.

Methods: Data were pooled from 16 participating case-control studies conducted internationally. Detailed individual occupational and smoking histories were available for 19 369 lung cancer cases (684 ever employed as painters) and 23 674 age-matched and sex-matched controls (532 painters). Multivariable unconditional logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, centre, cigarette pack-years, time-since-smoking cessation and lifetime work in other jobs that entailed exposure to lung carcinogens.

Results: Ever having worked as a painter was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in men (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.50). The association was strongest for construction and repair painters and the risk was elevated for all histological subtypes, although more evident for small cell and squamous cell lung cancer than for adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma. There was evidence of interaction on the additive scale between smoking and employment as a painter (relative excess risk due to interaction >0).

Conclusions: Our results by type/industry of painter may aid future identification of causative agents or exposure scenarios to develop evidence-based practices for reducing harmful exposures in painters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2020-106770DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7958079PMC
April 2021

Causal relationships between body mass index, smoking and lung cancer: Univariable and multivariable Mendelian randomization.

Int J Cancer 2021 03 23;148(5):1077-1086. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

The National Institute of Occupational Health (STAMI), Oslo, Norway.

At the time of cancer diagnosis, body mass index (BMI) is inversely correlated with lung cancer risk, which may reflect reverse causality and confounding due to smoking behavior. We used two-sample univariable and multivariable Mendelian randomization (MR) to estimate causal relationships of BMI and smoking behaviors on lung cancer and histological subtypes based on an aggregated genome-wide association studies (GWASs) analysis of lung cancer in 29 266 cases and 56 450 controls. We observed a positive causal effect for high BMI on occurrence of small-cell lung cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.24-2.06, P = 2.70 × 10 ). After adjustment of smoking behaviors using multivariable Mendelian randomization (MVMR), a direct causal effect on small cell lung cancer (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.06-1.55, P = .011), and an inverse effect on lung adenocarcinoma (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77-0.96, P = .008) were observed. A weak increased risk of lung squamous cell carcinoma was observed for higher BMI in univariable Mendelian randomization (UVMR) analysis (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.01-1.40, P = .036), but this effect disappeared after adjustment of smoking (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.90-1.16, P = .746). These results highlight the histology-specific impact of BMI on lung carcinogenesis and imply mediator role of smoking behaviors in the association between BMI and lung cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33292DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7845289PMC
March 2021

A Likelihood Ratio Test for Gene-Environment Interaction Based on the Trend Effect of Genotype Under an Additive Risk Model Using the Gene-Environment Independence Assumption.

Am J Epidemiol 2021 01;190(1):129-141

Several statistical methods have been proposed for testing gene-environment (G-E) interactions under additive risk models using data from genome-wide association studies. However, these approaches have strong assumptions from underlying genetic models, such as dominant or recessive effects that are known to be less robust when the true genetic model is unknown. We aimed to develop a robust trend test employing a likelihood ratio test for detecting G-E interaction under an additive risk model, while incorporating the G-E independence assumption to increase power. We used a constrained likelihood to impose 2 sets of constraints for: 1) the linear trend effect of genotype and 2) the additive joint effects of gene and environment. To incorporate the G-E independence assumption, a retrospective likelihood was used versus a standard prospective likelihood. Numerical investigation suggests that the proposed tests are more powerful than tests assuming dominant, recessive, or general models under various parameter settings and under both likelihoods. Incorporation of the independence assumption enhances efficiency by 2.5-fold. We applied the proposed methods to examine the gene-smoking interaction for lung cancer and gene-apolipoprotein E $\varepsilon$4 interaction for Alzheimer disease, which identified 2 interactions between apolipoprotein E $\varepsilon$4 and loci membrane-spanning 4-domains subfamily A (MS4A) and bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) genes at genome-wide significance that were replicated using independent data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa132DOI Listing
January 2021

Obesity and related conditions and risk of inflammatory breast cancer: a nested case-control study.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2020 Sep 20;183(2):467-478. Epub 2020 Jul 20.

Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA.

Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, poorly understood and aggressive tumor. We extended prior findings linking high body mass index (BMI) to substantial increased IBC risk by examining BMI associations before and after adjustment for well-characterized comorbidities using medical record data for diabetes, insulin resistance, and disturbances of cholesterol metabolism in a general community healthcare setting.

Methods: We identified 247 incident IBC cases diagnosed at Kaiser Permanente Northern California between 2005 and 2017 and 2470 controls matched 10:1 on birth year and geographic area and with ≥ 13 months of continuous enrollment prior to diagnosis/index date. We assessed exposures from 6 years up to one year prior to the diagnosis/index date, using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results: Before adjustment for comorbidities, ORs (95% CIs) for BMI of 25-< 30, 30-< 35, and ≥ 35 compared to < 25 kg/m were 1.5 (0.9-2.3), 2.0 (1.2-3.1), and 2.5 (1.4-4.4), respectively. After adjustment for pre-diabetes/diabetes, HDL-C and triglyceride levels, and dyslipidemia, corresponding ORs were 1.3 (0.8-2.1), 1.6 (0.9-2.9), and 1.9 (1.0-3.5). The OR for HDL-C levels < 50 mg/dL compared to ≥ 65 mg/dL was 2.0 (1.2-3.3) in the adjusted model. In a separate model the OR for a triglyceride/HDL-C ratio ≥ 2.50 compared to < 1.62 was 1.7 (1.1-2.8) after adjustment for BMI, pre-diabetes/diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Results did not differ significantly by estrogen receptor status.

Conclusions: Obesity and measures of insulin resistance independently increased IBC risk as did obesity and low HDL-C levels. These findings, if confirmed, have implications for IBC prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-020-05785-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8257005PMC
September 2020

Assessment of polygenic architecture and risk prediction based on common variants across fourteen cancers.

Nat Commun 2020 07 3;11(1):3353. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have led to the identification of hundreds of susceptibility loci across cancers, but the impact of further studies remains uncertain. Here we analyse summary-level data from GWAS of European ancestry across fourteen cancer sites to estimate the number of common susceptibility variants (polygenicity) and underlying effect-size distribution. All cancers show a high degree of polygenicity, involving at a minimum of thousands of loci. We project that sample sizes required to explain 80% of GWAS heritability vary from 60,000 cases for testicular to over 1,000,000 cases for lung cancer. The maximum relative risk achievable for subjects at the 99th risk percentile of underlying polygenic risk scores (PRS), compared to average risk, ranges from 12 for testicular to 2.5 for ovarian cancer. We show that PRS have potential for risk stratification for cancers of breast, colon and prostate, but less so for others because of modest heritability and lower incidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16483-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7335068PMC
July 2020

Genetic and epigenetic intratumor heterogeneity impacts prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma.

Nat Commun 2020 05 18;11(1):2459. Epub 2020 May 18.

Integrative Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) of genomic alterations may impact prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD). Here, we investigate ITH of somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs), DNA methylation, and point mutations in lung cancer driver genes in 292 tumor samples from 84 patients with LUAD. LUAD samples show substantial SCNA and methylation ITH, and clonal architecture analyses present congruent evolutionary trajectories for SCNAs and DNA methylation aberrations. Methylation ITH mapping to gene promoter areas or tumor suppressor genes is low. Moreover, ITH composed of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms altering the same cancer driver genes is shown in several tumors. To quantify ITH for valid statistical association analyses, we develope an average pairwise ITH index (APITH), which does not depend on the number of samples per tumor. Both APITH indexes for SCNAs and methylation aberrations show significant associations with poor prognosis. This study further establishes the important clinical implications of genetic and epigenetic ITH in LUAD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16295-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7235245PMC
May 2020

Association Analysis of Driver Gene-Related Genetic Variants Identified Novel Lung Cancer Susceptibility Loci with 20,871 Lung Cancer Cases and 15,971 Controls.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2020 07 10;29(7):1423-1429. Epub 2020 Apr 10.

National Institute of Occupational Health (STAMI), Oslo, Norway.

Background: A substantial proportion of cancer driver genes (CDG) are also cancer predisposition genes. However, the associations between genetic variants in lung CDGs and the susceptibility to lung cancer have rarely been investigated.

Methods: We selected expression-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (eSNP) and nonsynonymous variants of lung CDGs, and tested their associations with lung cancer risk in two large-scale genome-wide association studies (20,871 cases and 15,971 controls of European descent). Conditional and joint association analysis was performed to identify independent risk variants. The associations of independent risk variants with somatic alterations in lung CDGs or recurrently altered pathways were investigated using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project.

Results: We identified seven independent SNPs in five lung CDGs that were consistently associated with lung cancer risk in discovery ( < 0.001) and validation ( < 0.05) stages. Among these loci, rs78062588 in (1q21.3) was a new lung cancer susceptibility locus (OR = 0.86, = 1.65 × 10). Subgroup analysis by histologic types further identified nine lung CDGs. Analysis of somatic alterations found that in lung adenocarcinomas, rs78062588[C] allele ( in 1q21.3) was associated with elevated somatic copy number of (OR = 1.16, = 0.02). In lung adenocarcinomas, rs1611182 ( in 6p22.1) was associated with truncation mutations of the transcriptional misregulation in cancer pathway (OR = 0.66, = 1.76 × 10).

Conclusions: Genetic variants can regulate functions of lung CDGs and influence lung cancer susceptibility.

Impact: Our findings might help unravel biological mechanisms underlying lung cancer susceptibility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-1085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8120681PMC
July 2020

Lipid Trait Variants and the Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2020 05 27;29(5):1074-1078. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Background: Lipid traits have been inconsistently linked to risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We examined the association of genetically predicted lipid traits with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) using Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis.

Methods: Genome-wide association study data from the InterLymph Consortium were available for 2,661 DLBCLs, 2,179 CLLs, 2,142 FLs, 824 MZLs, and 6,221 controls. SNPs associated ( < 5 × 10) with high-density lipoprotein (HDL, = 164), low-density lipoprotein (LDL, = 137), total cholesterol (TC, = 161), and triglycerides (TG, = 123) were used as instrumental variables (IV), explaining 14.6%, 27.7%, 16.8%, and 12.8% of phenotypic variation, respectively. Associations between each lipid trait and NHL subtype were calculated using the MR inverse variance-weighted method, estimating odds ratios (OR) per standard deviation and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results: HDL was positively associated with DLBCL (OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00-1.30) and MZL (OR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.18), while TG was inversely associated with MZL risk (OR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83-0.99), all at nominal significance ( < 0.05). A positive trend was observed for HDL with FL risk (OR = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.99-1.19; = 0.087). No associations were noteworthy after adjusting for multiple testing.

Conclusions: We did not find evidence of a clear or strong association of these lipid traits with the most common NHL subtypes. While these IVs have been previously linked to other cancers, our findings do not support any causal associations with these NHL subtypes.

Impact: Our results suggest that prior reported inverse associations of lipid traits are not likely to be causal and could represent reverse causality or confounding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0803DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7196490PMC
May 2020

Immune-mediated genetic pathways resulting in pulmonary function impairment increase lung cancer susceptibility.

Nat Commun 2020 01 7;11(1):27. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Impaired lung function is often caused by cigarette smoking, making it challenging to disentangle its role in lung cancer susceptibility. Investigation of the shared genetic basis of these phenotypes in the UK Biobank and International Lung Cancer Consortium (29,266 cases, 56,450 controls) shows that lung cancer is genetically correlated with reduced forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV: r = 0.098, p = 2.3 × 10) and the ratio of FEV to forced vital capacity (FEV/FVC: r = 0.137, p = 2.0 × 10). Mendelian randomization analyses demonstrate that reduced FEV increases squamous cell carcinoma risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.51, 95% confidence intervals: 1.21-1.88), while reduced FEV/FVC increases the risk of adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.17, 1.01-1.35) and lung cancer in never smokers (OR = 1.56, 1.05-2.30). These findings support a causal role of pulmonary impairment in lung cancer etiology. Integrative analyses reveal that pulmonary function instruments, including 73 novel variants, influence lung tissue gene expression and implicate immune-related pathways in mediating the observed effects on lung carcinogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13855-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6946810PMC
January 2020

Insulin Resistance in Healthy U.S. Adults: Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2020 01 22;29(1):157-168. Epub 2019 Oct 22.

Biostatistics Branch, DCEG, NCI, NIH, Rockville, Maryland.

Background: Insulin is fundamental in two conditions that are epidemic in the United States and globally: obesity and type II diabetes. Given insulin's established mechanistic involvement in energy balance and glucose tolerance, we examined its relationship to common health-related endpoints in a large population-based sample.

Methods: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey is a cross-sectional study that uses a complex multistage probability design to obtain a representative sample of the United States population. Adult participants were included from 8 successive 2-year data waves (1999-2014), including 9,224 normal individuals, 7,699 prediabetic, and 3,413 diabetic subjects. The homeostatic model for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was available for 20,336 participants and its relationship with demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data was analyzed. We examined the relationship of HOMA-IR to 8 groups of outcome variables: general health, anthropometric/metabolic [waist size, body mass index (BMI)], cardiovascular (blood pressure), lipid [triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)], hepatic [alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT)], hematologic [white blood cells (WBC), hemoglobin (Hgb), platelets], inflammatory (C-reactive protein), and nutritional (vitamins D and C, serum folate, and pyridoxine) variables.

Results: HOMA-IR was generally strongly, monotonically, and highly significantly associated with adjusted outcomes in normal subjects, although clinical laboratory values were generally within normal bounds across insulin quartiles. In the normal subset, the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for a quartile change in HOMA-IR for obesity (BMI > 30) was 3.62 (3.30-3.97), and for the highest quintile for the triglyceride/HDL the ratio was 2.00 (1.77-2.26), for GGT it was 1.40 (1.24-1.58), and for WBC it was 1.28 (1.16-1.40). The relationship of HOMA-IR to the various outcomes was broadly similar to that observed in prediabetics and diabetics with a few exceptions.

Conclusions: HOMA-IR levels in a large sample of normal individuals are associated with poorer general health and adverse changes across a wide range of markers. A similar pattern of alterations is observed in prediabetic and diabetic samples.

Impact: Clinically, checking insulin levels may be helpful to identify patients that merit further observation and are candidates for early interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0206DOI Listing
January 2020

Association of elevated serumfree light chains with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

Blood Cancer J 2019 08 5;9(8):59. Epub 2019 Aug 5.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and its precursor, monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL), are heritable. Serumfree light-chain (sFLC) measures are a prognostic factor for CLL, but their role in susceptibility to CLL is not clear. We investigated differences between sFLC measurements in pre-treatment serum from five groups to inform the association of sFLC with familial and sporadic CLL: (1) familial CLL (n = 154), (2) sporadic CLL (n = 302), (3) familial MBL (n = 87), (4) unaffected first-degree relatives from CLL/MBL families (n = 263), and (5) reference population (n = 15,396). The percent of individuals having elevated monoclonal and polyclonal sFLCs was compared using age-stratified and age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression models. In age groups >50 years, monoclonal sFLC elevations were increased in sporadic and familial CLL cases compared to the reference population (p's < 0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in sFLC monoclonal or polyclonal elevations between familial and sporadic CLL cases (p's > 0.05). Unaffected relatives and MBL cases from CLL/MBL families, ages >60 years, showed elevated monoclonal sFLC, compared to the reference population (p's < 0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate monoclonal sFLC elevations in CLL cases compared to controls. Monoclonal sFLC levels may provide additional risk information in relatives of CLL probands.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41408-019-0220-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6683199PMC
August 2019

Tuberculosis infection and lung adenocarcinoma: Mendelian randomization and pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data from never-smoking Asian women.

Genomics 2020 03 12;112(2):1223-1232. Epub 2019 Jul 12.

Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Medical Research Center and Cancer Center of Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, China.

We investigated whether genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) influences lung adenocarcinoma development among never-smokers using TB genome-wide association study (GWAS) results within the Female Lung Cancer Consortium in Asia. Pathway analysis with the adaptive rank truncated product method was used to assess the association between a TB-related gene-set and lung adenocarcinoma using GWAS data from 5512 lung adenocarcinoma cases and 6277 controls. The gene-set consisted of 31 genes containing known/suggestive associations with genetic variants from previous TB-GWAS. Subsequently, we followed-up with Mendelian Randomization to evaluate the association between TB and lung adenocarcinoma using three genome-wide significant variants from previous TB-GWAS in East Asians. The TB-related gene-set was associated with lung adenocarcinoma (p = 0.016). Additionally, the Mendelian Randomization showed an association between TB and lung adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.66, p = 0.027). Our findings support TB as a causal risk factor for lung cancer development among never-smoking Asian women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygeno.2019.07.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6954985PMC
March 2020

Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of FTND and TTFC Phenotypes.

Nicotine Tob Res 2020 05;22(6):900-909

MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (IEU) at the University of Bristol, Bristol, BS, UK.

Introduction: FTND (Fagerstrӧm test for nicotine dependence) and TTFC (time to smoke first cigarette in the morning) are common measures of nicotine dependence (ND). However, genome-wide meta-analysis for these phenotypes has not been reported.

Methods: Genome-wide meta-analyses for FTND (N = 19,431) and TTFC (N = 18,567) phenotypes were conducted for adult smokers of European ancestry from 14 independent cohorts.

Results: We found that SORBS2 on 4q35 (p = 4.05 × 10-8), BG182718 on 11q22 (p = 1.02 × 10-8), and AA333164 on 14q21 (p = 4.11 × 10-9) were associated with TTFC phenotype. We attempted replication of leading candidates with independent samples (FTND, N = 7010 and TTFC, N = 10 061), however, due to limited power of the replication samples, the replication of these new loci did not reach significance. In gene-based analyses, COPB2 was found associated with FTND phenotype, and TFCP2L1, RELN, and INO80C were associated with TTFC phenotype. In pathway and network analyses, we found that the interconnected interactions among the endocytosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, axon guidance, MAPK signaling, and chemokine signaling pathways were involved in ND.

Conclusions: Our analyses identified several promising candidates for both FTND and TTFC phenotypes, and further verification of these candidates was necessary. Candidates supported by both FTND and TTFC (CHRNA4, THSD7B, RBFOX1, and ZNF804A) were associated with addiction to alcohol, cocaine, and heroin, and were associated with autism and schizophrenia. We also identified novel pathways involved in cigarette smoking. The pathway interactions highlighted the importance of receptor recycling and internalization in ND.

Implications: Understanding the genetic architecture of cigarette smoking and ND is critical to develop effective prevention and treatment. Our study identified novel candidates and biological pathways involved in FTND and TTFC phenotypes, and this will facilitate further investigation of these candidates and pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntz099DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7249921PMC
May 2020

Peritoneal mesothelioma and asbestos exposure: a population-based case-control study in Lombardy, Italy.

Occup Environ Med 2019 08 8;76(8):545-553. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

Occupational Health Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda - Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.

Objectives: Asbestos is the main risk factor for peritoneal mesothelioma (PeM). However, due to its rarity, PeM has rarely been investigated in community-based studies. We examined the association between asbestos exposure and PeM risk in a general population in Lombardy, Italy.

Methods: From the regional mesothelioma registry, we selected PeM cases diagnosed in 2000-2015. Population controls (matched by area, gender and age) came from two case-control studies in Lombardy on lung cancer (2002-2004) and pleural mesothelioma (2014). Assessment of exposure to asbestos was performed through a quantitative job-exposure matrix (SYN-JEM) and expert evaluation based on a standardised questionnaire. We calculated period-specific and gender-specific OR and 90% CI using conditional logistic regression adjusted for age, province of residence and education.

Results: We selected 68 cases and 2116 controls (2000-2007) and 159 cases and 205 controls (2008-2015). The ORs for ever asbestos exposure (expert-based, 2008-2015 only) were 5.78 (90% CI 3.03 to 11.0) in men and 8.00 (2.56 to 25.0) in women; the ORs for definite occupational exposure were 12.3 (5.62 to 26.7) in men and 14.3 (3.16 to 65.0) in women. The ORs for ever versus never occupational asbestos exposure based on SYN-JEM (both periods) were 2.05 (90% CI 1.39 to 3.01) in men and 1.62 (0.79 to 3.27) in women. In men, clear positive associations were found for duration, cumulative exposure (OR 1.33 (1.19 to 1.48) per fibres/mL-years) and latency.

Conclusions: Using two different methods of exposure assessment we provided evidence of a clear association between asbestos exposure and PeM risk in the general population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2019-105826DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6703122PMC
August 2019

Circulating markers of cellular immune activation in prediagnostic blood sample and lung cancer risk in the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3).

Int J Cancer 2020 05 22;146(9):2394-2405. Epub 2019 Jul 22.

Department of Epidemiology, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN.

Cell-mediated immune suppression may play an important role in lung carcinogenesis. We investigated the associations for circulating levels of tryptophan, kynurenine, kynurenine:tryptophan ratio (KTR), quinolinic acid (QA) and neopterin as markers of immune regulation and inflammation with lung cancer risk in 5,364 smoking-matched case-control pairs from 20 prospective cohorts included in the international Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium. All biomarkers were quantified by mass spectrometry-based methods in serum/plasma samples collected on average 6 years before lung cancer diagnosis. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lung cancer associated with individual biomarkers were calculated using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for circulating cotinine. Compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintiles of kynurenine, KTR, QA and neopterin were associated with a 20-30% higher risk, and tryptophan with a 15% lower risk of lung cancer (all p < 0.05). The strongest associations were seen for current smokers, where the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of lung cancer for the highest quintile of KTR, QA and neopterin were 1.42 (1.15-1.75), 1.42 (1.14-1.76) and 1.45 (1.13-1.86), respectively. A stronger association was also seen for KTR and QA with risk of lung squamous cell carcinoma followed by adenocarcinoma, and for lung cancer diagnosed within the first 2 years after blood draw. This study demonstrated that components of the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway with immunomodulatory effects are associated with risk of lung cancer overall, especially for current smokers. Further research is needed to evaluate the role of these biomarkers in lung carcinogenesis and progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32555DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6960354PMC
May 2020

Elevated Platelet Count Appears to Be Causally Associated with Increased Risk of Lung Cancer: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2019 05 30;28(5):935-942. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Research Unit of Molecular Epidemiology, Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.

Background: Platelets are a critical element in coagulation and inflammation, and activated platelets are linked to cancer risk through diverse mechanisms. However, a causal relationship between platelets and risk of lung cancer remains unclear.

Methods: We performed single and combined multiple instrumental variable Mendelian randomization analysis by an inverse-weighted method, in addition to a series of sensitivity analyses. Summary data for associations between SNPs and platelet count are from a recent publication that included 48,666 Caucasian Europeans, and the International Lung Cancer Consortium and Transdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung data consisting of 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls to analyze associations between candidate SNPs and lung cancer risk.

Results: Multiple instrumental variable analysis incorporating six SNPs showed a 62% increased risk of overall non-small cell lung cancer [NSCLC; OR, 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15-2.27; = 0.005] and a 200% increased risk for small-cell lung cancer (OR, 3.00; 95% CI, 1.27-7.06; = 0.01). Results showed only a trending association with NSCLC histologic subtypes, which may be due to insufficient sample size and/or weak effect size. A series of sensitivity analysis retained these findings.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest a causal relationship between elevated platelet count and increased risk of lung cancer and provide evidence of possible antiplatelet interventions for lung cancer prevention.

Impact: These findings provide a better understanding of lung cancer etiology and potential evidence for antiplatelet interventions for lung cancer prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7075698PMC
May 2019

Sex-related DNA methylation differences in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

Biol Sex Differ 2019 01 7;10(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.

Background: Men are at higher risk of developing chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) than women. DNA methylation has been shown to play important roles in a number of cancers. There are differences in the DNA methylation pattern between men and women. In this study, we investigated whether this contributes to the sex-related difference of B cell CLL risk.

Methods: Using the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, we profiled the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern of CD19 B cells from 48 CLL patients (29 female patients and 19 male patients) and 28 healthy people (19 women and 9 men).

Results: We identified 1043 sex-related differentially methylated positions (DMPs) related to CLL, 56 of which are located on autosomes and 987 on the X chromosome. Using published B cell RNA-sequencing data, we found 18 genes covered by the DMPs also have different expression levels in male and female CLL patients. Among them, TRIB1, an autosome gene, has been shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing apoptosis.

Conclusions: Our study represents the first epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) that investigates the sex-related differences in cancer, and indicated that DNA methylation differences might contribute to the sex-related difference in CLL risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13293-018-0213-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322323PMC
January 2019

Circulating high sensitivity C reactive protein concentrations and risk of lung cancer: nested case-control study within Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium.

BMJ 2019 01 3;364:k4981. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

Objectives: To conduct a comprehensive analysis of prospectively measured circulating high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration and risk of lung cancer overall, by smoking status (never, former, and current smokers), and histological sub-type.

Design: Nested case-control study.

Setting: 20 population based cohort studies in Asia, Europe, Australia, and the United States.

Participants: 5299 patients with incident lung cancer, with individually incidence density matched controls.

Exposure: Circulating hsCRP concentrations in prediagnostic serum or plasma samples.

Main Outcome Measure: Incident lung cancer diagnosis.

Results: A positive association between circulating hsCRP concentration and the risk of lung cancer for current (odds ratio associated with a doubling in hsCRP concentration 1.09, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.13) and former smokers (1.09, 1.04 to 1.14) was observed, but not for never smokers (P<0.01 for interaction). This association was strong and consistent across all histological subtypes, except for adenocarcinoma, which was not strongly associated with hsCRP concentration regardless of smoking status (odds ratio for adenocarcinoma overall 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.01). The association between circulating hsCRP concentration and the risk of lung cancer was strongest in the first two years of follow-up for former and current smokers. Including hsCRP concentration in a risk model, in addition to smoking based variables, did not improve risk discrimination overall, but slightly improved discrimination for cancers diagnosed in the first two years of follow-up.

Conclusions: Former and current smokers with higher circulating hsCRP concentrations had a higher risk of lung cancer overall. Circulating hsCRP concentration was not associated with the risk of lung adenocarcinoma. Circulating hsCRP concentration could be a prediagnostic marker of lung cancer rather than a causal risk factor.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6315896PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k4981DOI Listing
January 2019

Prevalence of pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants in the 24 cancer genes of the ACMG Secondary Findings v2.0 list in a large cancer cohort and ethnicity-matched controls.

Genome Med 2018 12 24;10(1):99. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Background: Prior research has established that the prevalence of pathogenic/likely pathogenic (P/LP) variants across all of the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) Secondary Findings (SF) genes is approximately 0.8-5%. We investigated the prevalence of P/LP variants in the 24 ACMG SF v2.0 cancer genes in a family-based cancer research cohort (n = 1173) and in cancer-free ethnicity-matched controls (n = 982).

Methods: We used InterVar to classify variants and subsequently conducted a manual review to further examine variants of unknown significance (VUS).

Results: In the 24 genes on the ACMG SF v2.0 list associated with a cancer phenotype, we observed 8 P/LP unique variants (8 individuals; 0.8%) in controls and 11 P/LP unique variants (14 individuals; 1.2%) in cases, a non-significant difference. We reviewed 115 VUS. The median estimated per-variant review time required was 30 min; the first variant within a gene took significantly (p = 0.0009) longer to review (median = 60 min) compared with subsequent variants (median = 30 min). The concordance rate was 83.3% for the variants examined by two reviewers.

Conclusion: The 115 VUS required database and literature review, a time- and labor-intensive process hampered by the difficulty in interpreting conflicting P/LP determinations. By rigorously investigating the 24 ACMG SF v2.0 cancer genes, our work establishes a benchmark P/LP variant prevalence rate in a familial cancer cohort and controls.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13073-018-0607-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6305568PMC
December 2018

Diurnal variation of metabolites in three individual participants.

Chronobiol Int 2019 03 17;36(3):332-342. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

b Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics , National Cancer Institute , Rockville , MD , USA.

The circadian system influences virtually all biological functions. Understanding the impact of circadian variation on metabolism may provide insight into mechanisms of circadian-associated disorders and guide the implementation of chrono-therapy. Previous research has reported circadian variation in 7-20% of metabolites in human blood. In this study, untargeted metabolomics profiles were measured using blood of two healthy men and one healthy woman, collected every 2 h for up to 48 h under carefully controlled conditions. The pattern of variation of each metabolite over time was examined on each participant separately, using both one- and two-order harmonic models. A total of 100 of 663 metabolites, representing all metabolite categories, showed diurnal rhythmic concentrations that exceeded the Bonferroni threshold (P < 2.5 × 10). Overall, peak times of many metabolites were clustered during the afternoon-midnight, including the majority of amino acids, all peptides, all lysolipids and all phospholipids, whereas the majority of steroids peaked in the morning. We observed substantial inter-individual variation for both peak times and amplitudes in these three subjects. In conclusion, at least 15% of blood metabolites, representing a broad group of biological pathways, exhibit diurnal variation in three participants. The average peak times of most of these metabolites are clustered in morning or afternoon-midnight. Further work is needed to validate and extend this work in more individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07420528.2018.1541901DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448392PMC
March 2019

Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer?

Int J Cancer 2019 09 15;145(6):1499-1503. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China.

Vitamin B supplementation can have side effects for human health, including cancer risk. We aimed to elucidate the role of vitamin B12 in lung cancer etiology via direct measurements of pre-diagnostic circulating vitamin B12 concentrations in a nested case-control study, complemented with a Mendelian randomization (MR) approach in an independent case-control sample. We used pre-diagnostic biomarker data from 5183 case-control pairs nested within 20 prospective cohorts, and genetic data from 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. Exposures included directly measured circulating vitamin B12 in pre-diagnostic blood samples from the nested case-control study, and 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with vitamin B12 concentrations in the MR study. Our main outcome of interest was increased risk for lung cancer, overall and by histological subtype, per increase in circulating vitamin B12 concentrations. We found circulating vitamin B12 to be positively associated with overall lung cancer risk in a dose response fashion (odds ratio for a doubling in B12 [OR ] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.06-1.25). The MR analysis based on 8 genetic variants also indicated that genetically determined higher vitamin B12 concentrations were positively associated with overall lung cancer risk (OR per 150 pmol/L standard deviation increase in B12 [OR ] = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.00-1.16). Considering the consistency of these two independent and complementary analyses, these findings support the hypothesis that high vitamin B12 status increases the risk of lung cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6642017PMC
September 2019

Non-Daily Cigarette Smokers: Mortality Risks in the U.S.

Am J Prev Med 2019 01 24;56(1):27-37. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.

Introduction: Worldwide, an estimated 189 million adults smoke tobacco "occasionally" but not every day. Yet few studies have examined the health risks of non-daily smoking.

Methods: Data from the 1991, 1992, and 1995 U.S. National Health Interview Surveys, a nationally representative sample of 70,913 U.S. adults (aged 18-95 years) were pooled. Hazard ratios and 95% CIs for death through 2011 were estimated from Cox proportional hazards regression using age as the underlying time metric and stratified by 5-year birth cohorts in 2017.

Results: Non-daily smokers reported smoking a median of 15 days and 50 cigarettes per month in contrast to daily smokers who smoked a median of 600 cigarettes per month. Compared with never smokers, lifelong nondaily smokers who had never smoked daily had a 72% higher mortality risk (95% CI=1.36, 2.18): higher risks were observed for cancer, heart disease, and respiratory disease mortalities. Higher mortality risks were observed among lifelong non-daily smokers who reported 11-30 (hazard ratio=1.34, 95% CI=0.81, 2.20); 31-60 (hazard ratio=2.02, 95% CI=1.17, 3.29); and >60 cigarettes per month (hazard ratio=1.74, 95% CI=1.12, 2.72) than never smokers. Median life-expectancy was about 5 years shorter for lifelong non-daily smokers than never smokers. As expected, daily smokers had even higher mortality risks (hazard ratio=2.50, 95% CI=2.35, 2.66) and shorter survival (10 years less).

Conclusions: Although the mortality risks of non-daily smokers are lower than daily smokers, they are still substantial. Policies should be specifically directed at this growing group of smokers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.06.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7477821PMC
January 2019

Two high-risk susceptibility loci at 6p25.3 and 14q32.13 for Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

Nat Commun 2018 10 10;9(1):4182. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, 30303, GA, USA.

Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM)/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) is a rare, chronic B-cell lymphoma with high heritability. We conduct a two-stage genome-wide association study of WM/LPL in 530 unrelated cases and 4362 controls of European ancestry and identify two high-risk loci associated with WM/LPL at 6p25.3 (rs116446171, near EXOC2 and IRF4; OR = 21.14, 95% CI: 14.40-31.03, P = 1.36 × 10) and 14q32.13 (rs117410836, near TCL1; OR = 4.90, 95% CI: 3.45-6.96, P = 8.75 × 10). Both risk alleles are observed at a low frequency among controls (~2-3%) and occur in excess in affected cases within families. In silico data suggest that rs116446171 may have functional importance, and in functional studies, we demonstrate increased reporter transcription and proliferation in cells transduced with the 6p25.3 risk allele. Although further studies are needed to fully elucidate underlying biological mechanisms, together these loci explain 4% of the familial risk and provide insights into genetic susceptibility to this malignancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06541-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6180091PMC
October 2018