Publications by authors named "Neha Pincha"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Parallels in signaling between development and regeneration in ectodermal organs.

Curr Top Dev Biol 2022 26;149:373-419. Epub 2022 Mar 26.

Program in Craniofacial Biology and Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States; Department of Pediatrics and Institute for Human Genetics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States. Electronic address:

Ectodermal organs originate from the outermost germ layer of the developing embryo and include the skin, hair, tooth, nails, and exocrine glands. These organs develop through tightly regulated, sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk, and they eventually assume various morphologies and functions while retaining the ability to regenerate. As with many other tissues in the body, the development and morphogenesis of these organs are regulated by a set of common signaling pathways, such as Shh, Wnt, Bmp, Notch, Tgf-β, and Eda. However, subtle differences in the temporal activation, the multiple possible combinations of ligand-receptor activation, the various cofactors, as well as the underlying epigenetic modulation determine how each organ develops into its adult form. Although each organ has been studied separately in considerable detail, the mechanisms underlying the parallels and differences in signaling that regulate their development have rarely been investigated. First, we will use the tooth, the hair follicle, and the mammary gland as representative ectodermal organs to explore how the development of signaling centers and establishment of stem cell populations influence overall growth and morphogenesis. Then we will compare how some of the major signaling pathways (Shh, Wnt, Notch and Yap/Taz) differentially regulate developmental events. Finally, we will discuss how signaling regulates regenerative processes in all three.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.ctdb.2022.02.006DOI Listing
March 2022

Activation of Fibroblast Contractility via Cell-Cell Interactions and Soluble Signals.

Bio Protoc 2018 Sep 20;8(18):e3021. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

IFOM-inStem Joint Research Laboratory, Institute for Stem Cell Science and Regenerative Medicine (inStem), Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

The collagen contraction assay is an , three-dimensional method to determine the factor(s) affecting the contractile behavior of activated cells such as fibroblasts in either physiological or pathological scenarios. The collagen lattices/hydrogels are seeded with fibroblasts to mimic the interactions between these cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix proteins in the connective tissue. This method is an important platform to assess components as potential therapeutic targets to prevent pathologies such as fibrosis, which are manifestations of hyperactivated fibroblasts. We have described a basic version of this collagen contraction assay, which is amenable to customization using different cell types under diverse experimental conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21769/BioProtoc.3021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8328620PMC
September 2018

Interactions Between Epidermal Keratinocytes, Dendritic Epidermal T-Cells, and Hair Follicle Stem Cells.

Methods Mol Biol 2019 ;1879:285-297

IFOM-inStem Joint Research Laboratory, Centre for Inflammation and Tissue Homeostasis, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

The interplay of immune cells and stem cells in maintaining skin homeostasis and repair is an exciting new frontier in cutaneous biology. With the growing appreciation of the importance of this new crosstalk comes the requirement of methods to interrogate the molecular underpinnings of these leukocyte-stem cell interactions. Here we describe how a combination of FACS, cellular coculture assays, and conditioned media treatments can be utilized to advance our understanding of this emerging area of intercellular communication between immune cells and stem cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/7651_2018_155DOI Listing
July 2019

PAI1 mediates fibroblast-mast cell interactions in skin fibrosis.

J Clin Invest 2018 05 26;128(5):1807-1819. Epub 2018 Mar 26.

IFOM-inStem Joint Research Laboratory, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

Fibrosis is a prevalent pathological condition arising from the chronic activation of fibroblasts. This activation results from the extensive intercellular crosstalk mediated by both soluble factors and direct cell-cell connections. Prominent among these are the interactions of fibroblasts with immune cells, in which the fibroblast-mast cell connection, although acknowledged, is relatively unexplored. We have used a Tg mouse model of skin fibrosis, based on expression of the transcription factor Snail in the epidermis, to probe the mechanisms regulating mast cell activity and the contribution of these cells to this pathology. We have discovered that Snail-expressing keratinocytes secrete plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1), which functions as a chemotactic factor to increase mast cell infiltration into the skin. Moreover, we have determined that PAI1 upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM1) expression on dermal fibroblasts, rendering them competent to bind to mast cells. This heterotypic cell-cell adhesion, also observed in the skin fibrotic disorder scleroderma, culminates in the reciprocal activation of both mast cells and fibroblasts, leading to the cascade of events that promote fibrogenesis. Thus, we have identified roles for PAI1 in the multifactorial program of fibrogenesis that expand its functional repertoire beyond its canonical role in plasmin-dependent processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI99088DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5919880PMC
May 2018

Stimulation of hair follicle stem cell proliferation through an IL-1 dependent activation of γδT-cells.

Elife 2017 12 4;6. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

IFOM-inStem Joint Research Laboratory, Centre for Inflammation and Tissue Homeostasis, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Bangalore, India.

The cutaneous wound-healing program is a product of a complex interplay among diverse cell types within the skin. One fundamental process that is mediated by these reciprocal interactions is the mobilization of local stem cell pools to promote tissue regeneration and repair. Using the ablation of epidermal caspase-8 as a model of wound healing in , we analyzed the signaling components responsible for epithelial stem cell proliferation. We found that IL-1α and IL-7 secreted from keratinocytes work in tandem to expand the activated population of resident epidermal γδT-cells. A downstream effect of activated γδT-cells is the preferential proliferation of hair follicle stem cells. By contrast, IL-1α-dependent stimulation of dermal fibroblasts optimally stimulates epidermal stem cell proliferation. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation and function of epidermal cell-immune cell interactions and into how components that are classically associated with inflammation can differentially influence distinct stem cell niches within a tissue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.28875DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5714500PMC
December 2017

Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II leads to G0/G1 arrest of Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

Cytotherapy 2014 May 7;16(5):640-52. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata, India. Electronic address:

Background Aims: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have remarkable clinical potential for cell-based therapy. Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (WJ-MSCs) from umbilical cord share unique properties with both embryonic and adult stem cells. MSCs are found at low frequency in vivo, and their successful therapeutic application depends on rapid and efficient large-scale expansion in vitro. Non-muscle myosin II (NMII) has pivotal roles in different cellular activities, such as cell division, migration and differentiation. We performed this study to understand the role of NMII in proliferation and cell cycle progression in WJ-MSCs.

Methods: WJ-MSCs were cultured in the presence of blebbistatin, and cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry, proliferation kinetics, senescence assay and gene expression profile using polymerase chain reaction array.

Results: When cultured in the presence of blebbistatin, an inhibitor of NMII adenosine triphosphatase activity, WJ-MSCs exhibited dose-dependent reduction in proliferative potential along with increase in cell size and induction of early senescence. Inhibition of NMII activity also affected cell cycle progression in WJ-MSCs and led to an increase in the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase with a corresponding reduction in the percentage of cells in G2/M phase. Blebbistatin-induced G0/G1 arrest of WJ-MSCs was further associated with up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitory genes CDKN1A, CDKN2A and CDKN2B and down-regulation of numerous genes related to progression through S and M phases of the cell cycle.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that inhibition of NMII activity in WJ-MSCs leads to G0/G1 arrest and alteration in the expression levels of certain key cell cycle-related genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcyt.2013.09.003DOI Listing
May 2014
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