Publications by authors named "Nedret Uzel"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Rational drug use for acute bronchiolitis in emergency care.

Turk J Pediatr 2017 ;59(2):155-161

Department of Pediatric Emergency, Istanbul University, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine; İstanbul, Turkey.

Uysalol M, Haşlak F, Özünal ZG, Vehid H, Uzel N. Rational drug use for acute bronchiolitis in emergency care. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 155-161. Despite the large variety of inhaled treatment options of acute bronchiolitis, there is no generally agreed treatment regime. This study aimed to determine the most appropriate treatment option. This was a double-blind randomized prospective clinical trial and has been performed in emergency department. The mean age of the 378 infants included in the study was 7.63 ± 4.6 months, and 54.8% (207) were boys. Patients were randomized by using the lottery method for simple random sample into 5 different treatment options; 3% hypertonic saline, nebulized adrenaline, nebulized adrenaline mixed with 3% hypertonic saline, nebulized salbutamol, and as control group; normal saline (0.9% NaCl). From the first treatment time until discharge time; treatment durations, adverse events and readmission rates within the first fifteen days were recorded for each patient. Nebulized adrenaline mixed with 3% hypertonic saline, as compared with other options, were associated with a significantly higher discharge rate at 4th hours (p < 0.001) and shorter length of hospital stay (p=0.039). However, there was no significant difference between options with regard to adverse events, discharge rates at 24th hours, and readmission rates within the first fifteen days. The superiority of discharge rates at 4 hours of nebulized adrenaline mixed with 3% hypertonic saline, was evaluated as `better acute response` and can be helpful to reduce hospitalization needs. Additionally, this option seems to be more effective to reduce length of hospital stay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.24953/turkjped.2017.02.007DOI Listing
November 2018

A 3 Year-Old Male Child Ingested Approximately 750 Grams of Elemental Mercury.

Balkan Med J 2016 Jul 1;33(4):467-9. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

Department of Pediatrics, İstanbul University İstanbul School of Medicine, İstanbul, Turkey.

Background: The oral ingestion of elemental mercury is unlikely to cause systemic toxicity, as it is poorly absorbed through the gastrointestinal system. However, abnormal gastrointestinal function or anatomy may allow elemental mercury into the bloodstream and the peritoneal space. Systemic effects of massive oral intake of mercury have rarely been reported.

Case Report: In this paper, we are presenting the highest single oral intake of elemental mercury by a child aged 3 years. A Libyan boy aged 3 years ingested approximately 750 grams of elemental mercury and was still asymptomatic.

Conclusion: The patient had no existing disease or abnormal gastrointestinal function or anatomy. The physical examination was normal. His serum mercury level was 91 µg/L (normal: <5 µg/L), and he showed no clinical manifestations. Exposure to mercury in children through different circumstances remains a likely occurrence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/balkanmedj.2016.15197DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5001828PMC
July 2016

Serum level of vitamin D and trace elements in children with recurrent wheezing: a cross-sectional study.

BMC Pediatr 2014 Oct 16;14:270. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Department of Pediatrics, Istanbul University, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Capa, 34390 Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: We aimed to show the relationship between recurrence of wheezing and serum levels of vitamin D, zinc, and copper in wheezy children compared with a healthy group.

Methods: In this cross sectional study, seventy-three children with wheezing and seventy-five controls were included without a follow-up period. The clinical characteristics of the children were assessed, the asthma predictive index and temporal pattern of wheeze were determined. The serum levels of vitamin D, zinc, and copper were measured. Pearson correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between homogeneously distributed variables.

Results: Thirty-two of the seventy-three children (43.8%) had more than three wheezing attacks (recurrent wheezing). The Asthma Predictive Index index was positive in 26 patients (35.6%). When classified to temporal pattern of wheeze, fifty-three of the study group (72.6%) had episodic wheezing and the remainder (27.4%) was classified as multiple-trigger wheezing. We found no overall significant difference between the study and control group in terms of vitamin D and trace elements . The vitamin D and zinc levels were significantly lower and serum copper and copper/zinc ratio was significantly higher in patients with recurrent wheezing (p =0.03, p <0.01, p =0.013, p <0.01, respectively) positive Asthma Predictive Index and multiple-trigger temporal pattern of wheeze compared with patients with non- recurrent wheezing, negative Asthma Predictive Index and episodic temporal pattern of wheeze.

Conclusion: It may be postulated that for the determination of asthma risk in patients with recurrent wheezing, the serum level of vitamin D, copper and zinc can be used as a routine biomarker alongside the Asthma Predictive Index and temporal pattern of wheeze.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-14-270DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4286924PMC
October 2014

A Rare Form of Guillan Barre Syndrome: A Child Diagnosed with Anti-GD1a and Anti-GD1b Positive Pharyngeal-Cervical-Brachial Variant.

Balkan Med J 2013 Sep 1;30(3):337-41. Epub 2013 Sep 1.

Department of Pediatrics, Şişli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, İstanbul, Turkey.

Background: Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant is a rare form of Guillan-Barre Syndrome (GBS). Antibodies against other membrane proteins like GM1b and GD1a have been found only in a small number of patients with Guillan Barre syndrome variant.

Case Report: Here, we report a 5.5 year-old boy diagnosed early with positive GD1a and GD1b gangliosides of Guillan-Barre syndrome pharyngeal cervical-Brachial variant, who improved and recovered fully in a short period. This is in contrast to those whose recovery period prolongs in spite of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment and/or those who experience incomplete recovery.

Conclusion: In summary, diagnosis of PCB variant of GBS should be considered in infants with sudden onset bulbar symptoms and muscle weakness, and it should be kept in mind that early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can give successful outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/balkanmedj.2013.8334DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4115905PMC
September 2013

Childhood asthma and vitamin D deficiency in Turkey: is there cause and effect relationship between them?

Ital J Pediatr 2013 Dec 13;39:78. Epub 2013 Dec 13.

Department of Pediatrics, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Fatih/Capa, 34093 Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Epidemiological studies show that vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are common worldwide and associated with many diseases including asthma. Our aim was to evaluate vitamin D insufficiency and its clinical consequences.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 170 children consisted of 85 who were asthmatic and 85 who were not, aged 2 to 14 years in Tekirdag, Turkey, from September 2009 to May 2010. Children's basal serum D vitamin levels were determined, and their eating habits, vitamin D intake, exposure to sunlight and use of health services during the previous year were investigated. The severity of asthma and levels of asthma control were assessed according to the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

Results: The difference between mean vitamin D levels in the asthmatic group (mean +/- SD) 16.6 +/- 8.5 ng/mL and the healthy control group (mean +/- SD) 28.2 +/- 19.5 ng/mL was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Children in the asthma group had less exposure to sunlight and ate a diet less rich in vitamin D (p < 0.001). A significant difference was observed between the groups regarding the frequency of respiratory tract infections leading to emergency unit admissions and number of hospitalizations (p < 0.001). It was also shown that a decrease in vitamin D level increased the severity of asthma (p < 0.001) and decreased the frequency of controlled asthma (p = 0.010).

Conclusion: This study has demonstrated the correlation between plasma 25 (OH) D levels and childhood asthma. Evidently, this relationship being influenced by multiple factors other than vitamin D, further studies should be conducted to explore the interrelation between all such factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1824-7288-39-78DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3892001PMC
December 2013

Immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with pulmonary tuberculosis.

Turk J Pediatr 2009 May-Jun;51(3):271-4

Department of Pediatric Intensive Care, Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine, Kayseri, Turkey.

Over the past decade, tuberculosis has been recognized worldwide as a public health problem of increasing proportions. We report a patient who presented with epistaxis and generalized petechiae. The diagnosis was immune thrombocytopenia and the patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and pulse steroid. The bleeding continued and thrombocyte level was low despite therapy. Chest X-ray and a computed tomography scan of the thorax showed right upper lobe opacities and bilateral interstitial infiltrates. The patient also had a history of close contact with an individual with active tuberculosis. The thrombocytopenia was resistant to standard therapy, but resolved after antituberculosis treatment. This report is the first case of a child with immune thrombocytopenia secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis.
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October 2009

Lidocaine treatment in pediatric convulsive status epilepticus.

Pediatr Int 2008 Feb;50(1):35-9

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskişehir, Turkey.

Background: Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) may end fatally or leave serious sequelae. CSE treatment, invariably an emergency case, is based upon i.v. benzodiazepines as well as phenytoin, barbiturates or both. The present paper reports efficiency of lidocaine in CSE.

Methods: The effects of lidocaine on patients with CSE due to infectious and non-infectious reasons were compared. Lidocaine was given in 29 episodes of CSE to 49 patients having failed to respond to first-line anticonvulsive drugs, such as diazepam, phenobarbital and phenytoin therapy. Lidocaine was given in doses of 2 mg/kg bolus i.v., and then in 4 mg/kg per h infusion.

Results: Mean duration of lidocaine infusion was 14.6 +/- 7.8 h. Effectiveness of lidocaine in patients with CSE was found to be 44.4%. Also, 11 patients responded to a single dose of lidocaine (37.9%), while another two (6.9%) required another dose to suppress their seizures. Patients with seizures attributable to infections were observed to have responded favorably to lidocaine when compared to those with seizures due to epilepsy (37.9% vs 6.8%; P < 0.05). Subsequent epilepsy was found to occur more frequently in patients with a poor response to lidocaine than in patients with a good response (P < 0.05). Adverse reactions to lidocaine were observed in three patients (10.3%), two of them having ventricular arrhythmia. As for the other patient, the focal seizure developed into a generalized one.

Conclusions: Lidocaine seems to be useful for the management of CSE as a rapid-acting anticonvulsant, particularly in patients with CSE due to infections. But further studies with larger number of patients are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-200X.2007.02510.xDOI Listing
February 2008

Acute colchicine intoxication in a child: a case report.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2007 May;23(5):314-7

Pediatric Emergency Department, SSK Bakirköy Maternity and Children Educational Hospital, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Colchicine poisoning is an uncommon, but potentially life-threatening, toxicologic emergency. The clinical features associated with overdose and the options for treatment are discussed. Colchicine poisoning typically shows 3 phases: initially, gastrointestinal symptoms predominate; in the second phase, multiorgan failure may occur, possibly leading to death. If the patient survives, the third phase of recovery follows, during which the patient often presents with hair loss. Early fatality is due to cardiovascular collapse and respiratory failure; however, pancytopenia and overwhelming septicemia can occur later. All patients suspected of having colchicine intoxication because of its unpredictable outcome should be managed according to the principles of intensive care, irrespective of the actual degree of poisoning. In those patients who survive the initial phase of poisoning, filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) offers an effective method of treating pancytopenia and preventing overwhelming septicemia. Daily monitoring of the patients' hematological status is strongly recommended. We are reporting a case of previously healthy girl who developed a multisystem organ failure after colchicine intoxication. The patient recovered completely and had no residual outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.pec.0000270163.84076.9fDOI Listing
May 2007

Seizures associated with poisoning in children: tricyclic antidepressant intoxication.

Pediatr Int 2006 Dec;48(6):582-5

Department of Pediatric Emergency, Institute of Child Health, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of seizure due to poisoning.

Methods: This was a retrospective analysis, throughout 4 years of hospital admissions for poisoning. Data of patients with seizures due to poisoning were evaluated with respect to the causes, frequencies and complications of seizures.

Results: Among the 1561 admissions due to intoxication during the review period, seizures developed in 26 cases (1.6%). Tricyclic antidepressant overdose (n = 11, 42%) was the leading cause of seizure due to poisoning. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures were observed in 24 patients. Status epilepticus developed in six patients (23%). Mechanical ventilation was applied in 12 (46%) patients. Cardiac complications were observed in 11 (42%) patients with seizures. Two patients who had cardiac arrest due to acepromazine maleate and imipramine intoxication died.

Conclusion: One of the causes of seizures in pediatric age group is intoxication. Seizures due to intoxications may cause serious clinical conditions. Intoxications should be thought when a patient is admitted with the diagnosis of afebrile seizure even if there is no history of drug intake.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-200X.2006.02276.xDOI Listing
December 2006

Metabolic disturbances following the use of inadequate solutions for hemofiltration in acute renal failure.

Pediatr Nephrol 2007 May 5;22(5):715-9. Epub 2006 Dec 5.

Department of Pediatric Intensive Care, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey.

Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has become an important supportive therapy for critically ill children with acute renal failure. In Turkey, commercially available diafiltration and replacement fluids cannot be found on the market. Instead, peritoneal dialysis fluids for dialysis and normal saline as replacement fluid are used. The first objective of this study was to examine metabolic complications due to CRRT treatments. The second objective was to determine demographic characteristics and outcomes of patients who receive CRRT. We did a retrospective chart review of all pediatric patients treated with CRRT between February and December 2004. Thirteen patients received CRRT; seven survived (53.8%). All patients were treated with continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration. Median patient age was 71.8 +/- 78.8 (1.5-180) months. Hyperglycemia occurred in 76.9% (n=10), and metabolic acidosis occurred in 53.8% (n=7) of patients. Median age was younger (48.8 vs.106.2 months), median urea level (106.2 vs. 71 mg/dl) and percent fluid overload (FO) (17.2% vs. 7.6%, respectively) were higher, and CRRT initiation time was longer (8.6 vs 5.6 days) in nonsurvivors vs. survivors for all patients, although these were not statistically significant. CRRT was stopped in all survivors, and four nonsurvivors (67%) were on renal replacement therapy at the time of death. Hyperglycemia and metabolic acidosis were frequently seen in CRRT patients when commercially available diafiltration fluids were not available. Using peritoneal dialysis fluid as dialysate is not a preferable solution. Early initiation of CRRT offered survival benefits to critically ill pediatric patients. Mortality was associated with the primary disease diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00467-006-0380-3DOI Listing
May 2007

Interhospital transport of pediatric patients requiring emergent care: current status in Turkey.

Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg 2004 Jul;10(3):168-72

Department of Pediatrics, Medicine Faculty of Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: This study was designed to evaluate the current situation of interhospital transport of pediatric patients requiring emergent care.

Methods: Using a clinical prospective and multicenter design, 1,666 interhospital transports of pediatric patients were evaluated in 18 centers. Non-emergency transports and newborn transports were not included, so 854 transports were eligible for evaluation. Data were collected by means of a comprehensive form filled by a physician at the receiving hospital.

Results: The physicians who gave the decisions for the transports were pediatricians in 60%, general physicians in 15.4%, and residents in 6%, while no identification existed in 159 transports (18.6%). The receiving hospitals were not notified prior to the transport in 79.3%. Pretransport information about the patients were adequate in 26.1% and inadequate in 31.8%; no information was available in 42.1%. Ambulances were used in 64.4% of the transports, of which only 16.2% was fully equipped. Unqualified or inexperienced personnel were in charge in 42.8% of the transports. In 26.3% of the transports, the patients arrived at the receiving hospital in an agonized state.

Conclusion: It appears that there are no established guidelines for the emergency transport of pediatric children in Turkey.
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July 2004

Seroconversion after measles vaccination at nine and fifteen months of age.

Pediatr Infect Dis J 2003 Aug;22(8):691-5

Department of Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Despite high vaccination coverage, single dose measles immunization programs have been unsuccessful in eliminating the disease. Because seroconversion rates are lower in infants vaccinated before 12 months of age, a second dose of measles vaccine is recommended at 15 months. The aim of this study was to determine the seroconversion rates in children after the first and second doses of measles vaccinations at 9 and 15 months of age.

Methods: Study population comprised 116 infants attending the Well Baby Clinic of Istanbul University, Faculty of Medicine. Serum specimens were obtained from children before and 1 month after the first measles (Rouvax, Schwarz strain 1000 TCID(50)) vaccine given at 9 months. A second dose was given to 72 children at 15 months of age as measles-mumps-rubella (Trimovax, Schwarz measles strain, 1000 TCID(50); Urabe Am 9 mumps strain, 5000 TCID(50); Wister RA 27/3 rubella strain, 1000 TCID(50)). Third blood samples were collected 20 months after the second vaccine.

Results: Passive antibody positivity rate was 5.2% at the age of 9 months. Seroconversion rate was 77.6% after the first dose and 81.9% after the second dose of measles vaccine. Of 15 children who were seronegative, 13 (86.7%) became seropositive after the immunization at 15 months. Eleven children (19.2%) seroconverted from positive to negative after the second vaccine.

Conclusion: The two dose schedule seems to increase the seropositivity rate. Our findings also indicate that increasing vaccination coverage and revaccination at 6 years of age are important even with the early two dose schedule.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.inf.0000078158.23337.edDOI Listing
August 2003

Central venous catheters in pediatric patients--subclavian venous approach as the first choice.

Pediatr Int 2002 Feb;44(1):83-6

Pediatric Emergency Department, Institute of Child Health, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: It is critical to establish a safe and functional i.v. access in severely sick patients. We evaluated the frequency of application and complications of central venous catheters in a pediatric intensive care unit.

Methods: Pediatric patients in whom central venous catheters were inserted between March 1997 and May 1999 in the Pediatric Emergency Room and Intensive Care Unit were enrolled in this study. Patients were evaluated with respect to age, sex, weight, central venous catheter indication, site, duration of catheter stay and complications.

Results: During the study period a total of 156 central venous catheters were successfully inserted into 146 patients. Of the 156 central venous catheter attempts, 148 (94.9%) were placed into the subclavian vein, six were inserted into the femoral vein, and two into the jugular vein. In 156 attempts, arterial injuries occurred in 20 cases (12.8%). Pneumothorax developed in two patients on mechanical ventilation. Three catheters had to be removed due to catheter related infections. The mortality rate was 0%.

Conclusions: We concluded that subclavian central venous catheterization is a safe procedure with minimal complications in pediatric patients. Arterial injury was the most frequent complication. In experienced hands, the success rate was 100%. Subclavian central venous catheter insertion may be considered as the first approach in critically ill patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1442-200x.2002.01509.xDOI Listing
February 2002

Acute isoniazid neurotoxicity in childhood.

Turk J Pediatr 2002 Jan-Mar;44(1):54-7

Department of Pediatric Emergency, Istanbul University Institute of Child Health, , Turkey.

Acute isoniazid (INH) poisoning is uncommon in children. Although most physicians are aware of INH hepatotoxicity, acute INH poisoning and its treatment are not well recognized. INH is increasingly being used to control the spread of tuberculosis, and physicians should know its potentially fatal effects. INH overdose is known to result in rapid onset of seizures, metabolic acidosis and prolonged obtundation. We report two cases of obtundation secondary to INH overdose that was immediately reversed by pyridoxine. Parenteral pyridoxine administration is an effective method in INH intoxication. The intravenous form of pyridoxine must be available in the emergency care units, and INH toxicity should be suspected in any patient with refractory seizures and metabolic acidosis.
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March 2002
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