Publications by authors named "Neda Yazdanfar"

2 Publications

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Maternal Morphine Exposure and Post-Weaning Social Isolation Impair Memory and Ventral Striatum Dopamine System in Male Offspring: Is an Enriched Environment Beneficial?

Neuroscience 2021 May 2;461:80-90. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Research Center of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address:

Maternal opioids abuse has some deleterious consequences on next generations. Besides, children's rearing conditions can affect the behavioral states and brain plasticity in their later life. In the present study, we investigated the effects of maternal morphine (MOR) treatment and post-weaning rearing conditions on memory, pain threshold, and the ventral striatum dopaminergic activity in male offspring. Female Wistar rats were treated twice daily either with escalating doses of MOR or with normal saline (NS) one week before mating, during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning, the male pups were assigned to six groups and then raised for an 8-week period under three different conditions: standard (STD), isolated (ISO) or enriched environment (EE). The behavioral tests, including passive avoidance task, novel object recognition, and tail-flick test, were also performed. Moreover, the ventral striatum dopamine's content (DA), mRNA expressions of dopamine receptor 1(D1R) and dopamine receptor 2 (D2R), and dopamine transporter (DAT) were evaluated. The obtained data showed that maternal MOR exposure and post-weaning social isolation could dramatically impair memory in offspring, while EE could reverse these adverse outcomes. Moreover, results of tail flick latency indicated the increased pain threshold in EE animals. At molecular level, maternal MOR injections and social isolation reduced DA levels and altered expressions of D1R, D2R, and DAT within the ventral striatum of these male offspring. However, post-weaning EE partially buffered these changes. Our finding signified the effects of maternal MOR exposure and social isolation on the behaviors and neurochemistry of brain in next generation, and it also provided evidence on reversibility of these alterations following EE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2021.02.024DOI Listing
May 2021

Enriched environment and social isolation differentially modulate addiction-related behaviors in male offspring of morphine-addicted dams: The possible role of μ-opioid receptors and ΔFosB in the brain reward pathway.

Brain Res Bull 2021 May 13;170:98-105. Epub 2021 Feb 13.

The Persian Gulf Physiology Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran; Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran. Electronic address:

Prenatal opioids exposure negatively affects the neurobehavioral abilities of children born from dependence dams. Adolescent housing conditions can buffer the detrimental impacts of early life experiences or contradictory can worsen individual psychosocial functions. The present study investigated the effects of maternal morphine dependence and different rearing conditions on behaviors and protein expression in brain reward circuits of male pups. Female Wistar rats a week before conception, during pregnancy and lactation were injected twice daily with escalating doses of morphine or saline. On a postnatal day 21, male pups were weaned and subjected to three different environments for two months: standard (STD), isolated (ISO), or enriched environment (EE). The anxiety and drug-related reward were measured using elevated plus maze, open field test, and conditioned place preference. Western blotting was used to determine the protein level of ΔFosB and μ-opioid receptor proteins in the striatum and the midbrain of male offspring, respectively. Results showed that maternal morphine administration dramatically increased anxiety-like and morphine place preference behaviors in offspring. Also, ISO condition aggravated these behavioral outcomes. While, rearing in EE could attenuate anxiety and morphine conditioning in pups. At molecular levels, maternal morphine exposure and social isolation markedly increased both of ΔFosB and μ-opioid receptor proteins expression. However, rearing in the EE declined ΔFosB protein expression. Together, these findings help to elucidate long lasting impacts of early life morphine exposure and rearing environment on the behavioral and molecular profile of addicted individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2021.02.005DOI Listing
May 2021