Publications by authors named "Neda Orakifar"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Examination of Lumbopelvic and Lower Extremity Movements in two Subgroups of People with Chronic Low Back Pain Based on the Movement System Impairment Model During a Stair Descending Task.

Ortop Traumatol Rehabil 2019 Jun;21(3):197-205

Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Center, Ahvaz Junndishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Background: Excessive and early lumbopelvic motion during functional tasks is associated with increased pain and symptoms in people with low back pain. The purpose of the current study was to compare lumbopelvic and lower extremity movements in two subgroups of chronic low back pain sufferers and healthy subjects during a stair descending task based on a movement system impairment model.

Material And Methods: A clinical examination was conducted to assign people with low back pain to movement system impairment-based subgroups. A control group included 18 healthy subjects, a lumbar Rotation with Flexion group included 12 subjects, and a lumbar Rotation with Extension group included 16 subjects. Differences in kinematics data between the groups were recorded during a stair descending task using a 7-camera 3-dimensional motion capture system.

Results: In the lumbar Rotation with Flexion group, the onset of lumbar movement occurred earlier than in the control group (p = 0.043). In the lumbar Rotation with Flexion group, axial and frontal plane rotation of the pelvis and lower extremity were significantly greater than in the control group. Mean differences between the lumbar Rotation with Extension and control group were minimal for the motion assessed.

Conclusion: Early and excessive lumbopelvic movement and more axial rotation in the lower extremities during a stair descending task were found in the lumbar Rotation with Flexion subgroup, which can be an important factor contributing to the development or persistence of low back pain in this group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5604/01.3001.0013.2933DOI Listing
June 2019

Muscle Activity Pattern Dysfunction During Sit to Stand and Stand to Sit in the Movement System Impairment Subgroups of Low Back Pain.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2019 05 11;100(5):851-858. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Objective: To investigate impairment in the activity pattern of some muscles involved in sit to stand (STD) and stand to sit (STS) among 2 low back pain (LBP) subgroups of the Movement System Impairment (MSI) model.

Design: Case-control study.

Setting: A university medical center.

Participants: Fifteen women without chronic LBP and 22 women with chronic LBP (N=37) in 2 subgroups (15 into the lumbar extension rotation (LER) and 7 into lumbar flexion rotation [LFR]) voluntarily participated in this study.

Interventions: Participants were asked to perform STD and STS at a preferred speed. Surface electromyography (EMG) were measured bilaterally from the internal oblique (IO), lumbar erector spine (ES), medial hamstring (MH), and lateral hamstring (LH) muscles.

Main Outcome Measures: Changes in mean and maximum amplitude, time to peak amplitude, duration of muscle activity, and bilateral asymmetry of these variables.

Results: During STD, bilateral asymmetry in mean amplitude of MH in the LER subgroup (P=.031) and bilateral asymmetry in duration of LH in the LFR subgroup (P=.026) were exhibited. Also, in this task reduced time to peak left MH activation were found in the LFR subgroup than 2 other groups (control; P=.028/LER; P=.004). During STS, increased left ES maximum amplitude were observed in the LFR subgroup than LER subgroup (P=.029). Also, reduced time to peak right ES (P=.035) and left LH (P=.038) activation in the LER subgroup than control subjects and reduced time to peak left LH activation in LFR subgroup than control subjects (P=.041) were observed during STS.

Conclusions: The differences between the 2 LBP subgroups may be a result of impairment in the activity pattern of some muscles during functional activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2018.08.190DOI Listing
May 2019

Sacroiliac joint manipulation attenuates alpha-motoneuron activity in healthy women: a quasi-experimental study.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2012 Jan;93(1):56-61

Physiotherapy Section, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objective: To determine whether sacroiliac joint (SIJ) manipulation decreases α-motoneuron activity and increases the pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) in healthy women.

Design: Quasi-experimental study.

Setting: A university medical center.

Participants: Healthy young women (N=20) aged 18 to 30 years were recruited from among the students of a university medical center after a request for volunteers.

Interventions: Joint manipulation consisted of the supine rotational glide manipulation for the sacroiliac region. PPT measurements from the PSIS and Hoffman-reflex (H-reflex) amplitudes from the tibial nerve on the same side were recorded before and after joint manipulation. PPT was monitored for 15 minutes and H-reflex for 20 minutes after the procedure.

Main Outcome Measures: Changes in tibial nerve H-reflex amplitude and PPT values after SIJ manipulation.

Results: SIJ manipulation attenuated α-motoneuronal activity significantly (P<.05) but transiently, since the decrease was seen only for 20 seconds after the intervention. There was no positive significant difference in the PPT after SIJ manipulation at any time during postintervention follow-up.

Conclusions: SIJ manipulation produced a transient attenuation of α-motoneuron excitability in healthy women. These findings demonstrate that our manipulation technique can lead to a short-term reduction in muscle tone as a result of changes in sensory discharge, predominantly in la afferents. SIJ manipulation did not significantly affect the PPT in healthy women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2011.05.027DOI Listing
January 2012