Publications by authors named "Nebiye Yentur Doni"

21 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of inflammatory parameters in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis.

Dermatol Ther 2021 Jan 7;34(1):e14603. Epub 2020 Dec 7.

Department of Microbiology, Harran University Medical Faculty, Sanlıurfa, Turkey.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector-borne parasitic disease characterized by various skin lesions that can cause deformities when healed. Our aim in this study is to show the utility of parameters such as neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), thrombocyte/lymphocyte ratio (TLR), and mean thrombocyte volume (MTV) as auxiliary laboratory methods in CL patients. About 107 patients who were admitted to our dermatological and venereal diseases outpatient clinic between January 2018 and January 2019 and were diagnosed with CL by microscopic examination and 74 healthy individuals were included in the study. There were no significant differences between the patient and control group in terms of neutrophil counts, leukocyte counts, platelet counts, and NLR values (P values: .271, .053, .263, and .459, respectively). When the TLR and MTV values of patients with CL and those of the healthy controls were compared, it was found that TLR and MTV values were statistically higher in patients with CL (P values of .010 and .044, respectively). Based on these data, NLR was not considered to be a suitable parameter for demonstrating inflammation in CL patients, but TLR and MTV were held to be an appropriate parameter for demonstrating inflammation in CL patients. In addition, we think that the increase in MTV and TLR, can be used as an auxiliary laboratory test in the diagnosis of CL disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.14603DOI Listing
January 2021

Atypical and unusual morphological variants of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

Int J Clin Pract 2020 Oct 26:e13730. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Department of Pathology, Harran University Medical Faculty, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Objective: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a skin disease characterised by prolonged nodulo-ulcerative lesions of the skin that heals with atrophic scar. Clinical features of CL vary depending on the type of parasite and host immune resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of atypical and unusual morphological variants of CL patients diagnosed in our clinic.

Materials And Methods: In this prospective study, 27 CL patients with atypical clinical features among 486 patients admitted to our clinic between July 2018 and September 2019 and diagnosed as CL by slit-skin smear examination or histopathological examination were included.

Results: Of 27 patients, 15 (55.5%) were male and 12 (44.5%) were female. The mean age of the patients was 25.8 ± 7.62 years. Seven (25.9%) patients had lupoid lesions, five (18.6%) patients had eczematoid lesions, four (14.8%) patients had lip lesions, three (11.1%) patients had erysipelas-like lesions, two (7.4%) patients had eyelid lesions, two (7.4%) patients had sporotrichoid lesions, two (7.4%) patients had verrucous lesions, one (3.7%) patient had psoriasiform lesion and one (3.7%) patient had paronychial lesion.

Conclusion: In conclusion, rare clinical forms of CL are presented in this study. It should be kept in mind that CL may have very different clinical features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of eczema, psoriasis, erysipelas, sporotrichosis, paronychia and verrucous lesions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijcp.13730DOI Listing
October 2020

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis due to Three Leishmania Species Among Syrian Refugees in Sanliurfa, Southeastern Turkey.

Acta Parasitol 2020 Dec 16;65(4):936-948. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Ministry of Health, Health Sciences University, Van Training and Research Hospital, Dermatology Clinic, Van, Turkey.

Sanliurfa, a city in southeastern Turkey, is host to 477,166 Syrian refugees. The incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) may be on the rise in areas affected by a refugee crisis, like Sanliurfa; thus, consequently, local uncommon species of Leishmania may be encountered in these regions. This might potentially make diagnosis and treatment more challenging over time. In this study, it was aimed to identify the causative agents of CL in clinical samples. A total of 154 patients (60 Syrian and 94 Turkish) who were diagnosed with CL via microscopical examination and PCR were enrolled this study. All of the samples were analyzed using internal transcribed spacer 1 genes, restriction fragment length polymorphism, DNA-sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses. In this study, Leishmania tropica was determined to be the predominant species in 140 of the patients (90.9%), followed by Leishmania major in 12 patients (7.8%), and Leishmania infantum in 2 patients (1.3%). Of the 94 Turkish patients, 94.7% were infected with L. tropica and 5.3% were infected with L. major, while none were infected with L. infantum. However, of the 60 Syrian patients, 85% were infected with L. tropica, 11.7% were infected with L. major, and 3.3% were infected with L. infantum. There was a significant association between the Leishmania species and the nations (Turkish-Syrian) (P < 0.001). The sequences were numbered from MH347941 to MH347953 and submitted to GenBank. This study confirmed that L. tropica, L. major, and L. infantum coexisted in Sanliurfa. This was the first time that the species L. infantum was reported among recent immigrants from Syria in Sanliurfa. Therefore, it is necessary to discriminate the Leishmania species for diagnosis, treatment, and controlled studies in hyper-endemic regions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/s11686-020-00227-wDOI Listing
December 2020

[Determination of imported malaria cases in Hatay by the use of molecular methods].

Mikrobiyol Bul 2018 Apr;52(2):206-213

Harran University, Vocational School of Health Services, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Malaria, being among the most important diseases throughout history, is still an important public health problem among parasitic diseases due to increasing population movements with various reasons such as migration, war and travel. According to WHO data each year 300-350 million people get exposed to malaria, each year 1.5-2.7 million people die from malaria and also 40% of the world's population is still at risk for this disease. According to World Health Organisation (WHO) data, imported cases were not reported since 2013 in our country. However among imported cases Plasmodium falciparum malaria can be observed. The aim of this study wasto draw attention to the imported malaria cases increasing gradually and to the importance of the chemoprophylaxis in terms of malaria before travelling. In the study, male patients who have admitted to Hatay Province Malaria Center or Mustafa Kemal University Infectious Disease Department, ages between 25-60 years, were analyzed. All of the patients have worked abroad before. Patients were mostly from Sudan but there were also patients from endemic regions such as Africa, Nigeria, Pakistan, Mali island. The cases were evaluated according to age, gender and whether they had travel stories in Turkey or abroad. Blood samples taken from the patients were firstly prepared by thin and thick smear preparations and examined microscopically by staining with Giemsa stain method. Samples that were found positive by microscopic examination were impregnated on drying papers and genotyped using nested-PCR. Out of the 30 samples from patients who had traveled to endemic countries before, determined as positive by microscopical examination and genotyped by nested-PCR, 16 of them were identified as P.falciparum, six of them as P.vivax and eight of them as P.falciparum/P.vivax. The study suggested that malaria prophylaxis has to be applied before travelling to endemic countries, in return imported malaria has to be considered one of the first diseases in mind and people who will travel should be informed about this disease before travel.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5578/mb.66637DOI Listing
April 2018

Correction to: Molecular identification of Leishmania spp. isolates causes cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Sanliurfa Province, Turkey, where CL is highly endemic.

Folia Microbiol (Praha) 2018 05;63(3):361

Department of Clinical Microbiology, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

In published article (Molecular Identification of Leishmania spp. Isolates Causes Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) in Sanliurfa Province, Turkey, Where CL is Highly Endemic) Table 1 titled "The pH values of yogurts collected from villages in Turkey" doesn't belong to this article.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12223-017-0580-1DOI Listing
May 2018

Molecular identification of Leishmania spp. isolates causes cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Sanliurfa Province, Turkey, where CL is highly endemic.

Folia Microbiol (Praha) 2018 May 7;63(3):353-359. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

Department of Clinical Microbiology, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is an important public health problem in Turkey. CL has been most frequently seen in Sanliurfa. There is an expectation of increase in the population of leishmaniasis cases with the influence of Syrian refugees arriving in Turkey. In this study we aimed to diagnosis of CL and identifying of parasite from Leishmania isolates by using ITS 1 PCR RFLP. Samples were collected from 135 CL patients in Sanliurfa. After the specimens were inoculated in medium NNN, the ones which were cultures positive were cultivated in RPMI 1640 followed by PCR-RFLP. Genomic DNA was extracted phenol-chloroform procedure. Samples were examined by using ITS 1 PCR followed by RFLP analysis. Our results indicated that two species, L. tropica (132 samples) and L. major (3 samples), are responsible for cutaneous leishmaniasis in Sanlıurfa. Our study is the first scientific study in which it is reported molecular analyses of cutaneous leishmaniasis cases caused by L. major in Sanliurfa in Southestern Anatolia Region. Because CL cases caused by L.major are detected in our study, it is considered that genotyping is important for diagnosis of Leishmania and following change of epidemiology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12223-017-0556-1DOI Listing
May 2018

The knowledge and high seroprevalence of hepatitis A in a high-risk group (agricultural reproductive-aged women) in the southeastern region of Turkey

Turk J Med Sci 2017 08 23;47(4):1055-1060. Epub 2017 Aug 23.

Background/aim: The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of antihepatitis A virus (HAV), risk factors, and the knowledge of female farm workers living in the Southeastern Anatolia Region (SAR) of Turkey. Materials and methods: This representative cross-sectional survey was conducted between January and April of 2013 in the SAR. A total of 705 reproductive-aged women were randomly selected by clustering method using Epi Info software. The sera were analyzed for anti-HAV antibodies using ELISA. Sociodemographic information and the knowledge of female farm workers regarding hepatitis A were collected using a questionnaire. Results: Of the female farm workers, 99.1% were seropositive for anti-HAV. The anti-HAV seroprevalence was significantly higher in the adults than in the adolescents (P < 0.05). Of the participants, 64.5% had 7 or more family members, 58.4% had 5 or more pregnancies, 68.1% were illiterate, 65.2% were family farmers, 90.6% were poor, 71.9% used unsafe water, 58.9% had toilets outside, and 68% had no knowledge about hepatitis A. Conclusion: Turkey is considered to have high endemicity and female farm workers are considered a high-risk group for hepatitis A. This high HAV exposure might be reduced with vaccination, as well as improvements in sanitation, living conditions, health care utilization, safer drinking water, and health education.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3906/sag-1505-22DOI Listing
August 2017

A community-based survey on Syrian refugee women's health and its predictors in Şanliurfa, Turkey.

Women Health 2018 07 12;58(6):617-631. Epub 2017 May 12.

d United Nations Population Fund , Ankara , Turkey.

Reproductive characteristics, mental health symptoms, micronutrient deficiencies, and symptoms of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) were determined among married Syrian refugee women aged 15-49 years who were living outside of camps in 2015, using probability sampling. Of the 458 participants, 51.3 percent married before the age of 18 years. Early-age marriages and number of desired children increased after the war. In multivariable analyses, education (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-1.3) and length of stay in Şanlıurfa (aOR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.1-1.2) were independently associated with early marriage. Approximately 16 percent of women were pregnant, and 26.7 percent of them had not received prenatal care; 47.7 percent had had a pregnancy loss; 50.8 percent reported symptoms of STIs. Of those who were sexually active, 37.8 percent were not using contraception. The prevalence of iron, B, and folic acid deficiencies was 50 percent, 45.6 percent, and 10.5 percent, respectively. Early marriage (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.4-3.5) and number of desired children (aOR = 5.03; 95% CI = 3.2-7.9) were associated with not using contraception. Most (89.7 percent) women reported at least two mental health symptoms; lack of social support (aOR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.3-5.3), language barrier (aOR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.01-5.2), and B deficiency (aOR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.01-3.4) were associated with such symptoms. The findings demonstrate the need for reproductive health and psychosocial services.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03630242.2017.1321609DOI Listing
July 2018

[Investigation of the prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis among female Syrian refugees with the complaints of vaginitis aged between 15-49 years].

Mikrobiyol Bul 2016 Oct;50(4):590-597

Harran University Vocational School of Health Services, Medical Laboratory Programme, Medical Microbiology, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Since the Syrian civil war began in 2011, most of the Syrian refugees have immigrated to Turkey due to its open gate policy and the width of the border. By the end of 2015, it was estimated that there were 2.5 million Syrian refugees in Turkey. Many of the Syrian refugees live in Sanliurfa due to its location on the border with Syria. Trichomonas vaginalis, apart from viral agents is the most common parasite among sexually transmitted infection agents. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of T.vaginalis among female married Syrian refugees living outside of the camps in Sanliurfa city center, aged between 15-49 years with complaints of vaginitis. This multi-purpose survey was carried out between February and March of 2015, in collaboration with the United Nations Population Fund and Harran University. This study was approved under the heading of "General Health Status of Female Syrian Refugees" by the Ethics Committee of Harran University Faculty of Medicine. A total of 460 Syrian refugees house were selected using the probability cluster sampling method, with a 95% confidence level and a 5% confidence interval with a design effect. Two women refused to participate in the study, and the response rate was 99.6%. Two Syrian nurses, one laboratory technician, and one interpreter who knew Kurdish and Arabic were hired for the field survey. A structured questionnaire written in Turkish was translated to Arabic and used to collect the sociodemographic data during face to face interviews. According to the questionnaire data, the women with the complaints of vaginal discharge, unusual vaginal bleeding and/or dyspareunia were invited to the Gynecology Department of Harran University Research and Training Hospital for a medical examination. During gynecological examination, swab samples obtained from posterior fornix were evaluated by direct microscopy and Giemsa staining methods for the presence of T.vaginalis trophozoites. Of 458 women who have participated the questionnaire survey, 232 (50.6%) have declared that they had vaginitis complaints. Accordingly, 157 symptomatic and non-pregnant women were invited to the hospital, however only 89 (56.7%) accepted the invitation. T.vaginalis infection was detected in 19 (21.3%) by direct microscopy, and in 32 (36%) by Giemsa staining of the samples taken during the examination of those 89 women (mean age: 31.6 ± 8.7 years). In the gynecological examination, 56.2% (50/89) of the women were clinically diagnosed as vaginitis. A statistically significant association was detected between T.vaginalis positivity and the cases with or without the clinical vaginitis diagnosis (p< 0.001). Our data indicated that the prevalence of T.vaginalis (36%) detected in the female Syrian refugees is higher than the prevalence (3-13%) of our general population, but it is close to the prevalence (40%) in groups with risky behaviors (sex workers). In conclusion, health screening studies and health educations about safe sex life for Syrian refugees would be useful in the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5578/mb.28173DOI Listing
October 2016

[Investigation of cutaneous leishmaniasis by active screening in primary schools in Sanliurfa, Turkey].

Mikrobiyol Bul 2016 Oct;50(4):559-568

Harran University Vocational School of Health Services, Medical Laboratory Program, Department of Medical Microbiology, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is endemic in Sanliurfa, a province located at southestern part of Turkey. The aims of this study were to determine CL cases among children aged 7-15 years attending primary schools and evaluate the demographical and clinical characteristics by active screening method. In our study, a total of 163.464 children attending to 123 primary schools have been evaluated in terms of CL prevalence between 2010 to 2012 period. Accordingly, 67.585, 72.279 and 23.600 students studying in 74, 37 and 12 primary schools were actively screened, respectively. Children suspected with CL were invited to the Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Oriental Sore, Sanlıurfa Division of Turkish Public Health Institute. Two slides were prepared from bloodless, serous fluid of the skin lesions and stained with Giemsa for the microscopic examination to identify Leishmania amastigotes. The lesions were also evaluated according to their clinical manifestations, size, duration and number. In the study, 455 (%0.3) of the children were diagnosed as CL. The incidence of CL cases was 0.41%, 0.14%, and 0.31% in 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively. Of the CL cases, 250 (54.9%) were female and 205 (45.1%) were male with a mean age of 10.54 ± 2.42 years. Most of the cases (64.2%) were in 7-11 years old group, while 35.8% were in 12-15 years old group. The average number of the CL lesions was 1.78±0.7, ranging from one to fifteen. Single lesions were detected in 281 cases (61.8%), whereas double, triple and multiple lesions (≥ 4) were detected in 87 (19.1%), 51 (11.2%) and 36 (7.9%) of the CL cases, respectively. The lesions were mostly involved on face (n= 280, 61.5%) and especially cheeks (133/280, 47.5%), followed by upper (n= 127, 27.9%) and lower (n=39, 8.6%) extremities. The average duration of lesions was 13.40 ± 0.47 months (range: 4-104 weeks) and the average size of lesions was 10.32 ± 0.4 mm (range: 3-10 mm). Among all, mostly nodular (n= 211, 46.4%) and ulcerative (n=204, 44.8%) lesions were recorded. Of the cases 330 (72.5%) were diagnosed as acute CL (duration of lesions were ≤ 24 months), while 125 (27.5%) were chronic CL (duration of lesions were > 24 months). Leishmaniasis recidivans were identified in a total of five (1.1%) cases, of them one was acute and four was chronic CL cases. Twenty-five relatives of the children with CL were diagnosed as new CL cases in the 2011-2012 period. Most of the patients (n= 437, 96%) were successfully treated with topical pentavalent antimonials, however 18 (4%) who were unresponsive to local therapy were treated systemically. Our findings showed that local transmission is ongoing in terms of CL. It should be kept in mind that, primary school aged children might be responsible for the ongoing local transmission in endemic regions and the local transmission may be decreased with the early diagnosis and treatment of CL cases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5578/mb.32180DOI Listing
October 2016

Investigation of brucellosis in a female agricultural population in Turkey.

Trop Doct 2017 Apr 24;47(2):132-136. Epub 2017 Jan 24.

5 Assistant, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Much epidemiological information concerning brucellosis generally depends on the evaluation of hospital-based retrospective data. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of brucellosis in female farmworkers in the south-eastern region of Turkey (GAP) in order to obtain a more representative analysis. Our representative community-based cross-sectional study was conducted during four months of 2013, in all nine GAP provinces. An optimum sample size was determined and blood samples were analysed from 707 reproductive-age female farmworkers using the Rose Bengal (RBT) and standard (SAT) agglutination tests. Sociodemographic information was collected during face-to-face interviews with consenting subjects. Crude odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and chi-square analyses and logistic regression were performed. Employment as a seasonal farmworker and having had five or more pregnancies were the only risk factors found to be significant. This study implies much greater priority needs be given to the control, early diagnosis and treatment in this population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0049475516688148DOI Listing
April 2017

Detection of Plasmodium using filter paper and nested PCR for patients with malaria in Sanliurfa, in Turkey.

Malar J 2016 May 28;15(1):299. Epub 2016 May 28.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Fırat University, Elazig, Turkey.

Background: The objective of this study to detect Plasmodium and a subspecies of Plasmodium using filter paper in malaria endemic province, Sanliurfa, in Turkey, compare the results of nested PCR (nPCR) with microscopy for the diagnosis of malaria and present the epidemiological data of malaria.

Methods: This study was carried out in malaria-endemic Sanliurfa between 2008 and 2011. Finger prick blood samples, thick and thin Giemsa-stained blood smears, were collected from 153 malaria-suspected farmworkers. The Giemsa-stained blood smears were examined microscopically. The obtained DNA products, extracted from blood-spotted filter papers or from the thick blood smears, were analysed by nPCR to amplify the 18S ssrRNA Plasmodium gene with genus and specific primers. The results of the microscopy were compared to the nPCR results.

Results: Of the specimens, 7.2 % were determined as Plasmodium-positive by microscopy, whereas 9.8 % were determined as Plasmodium-positive by nPCR. Of the positive Plasmodium specimens, 93.33 % were identified as P. vivax. Four out of the 15 specimens that were microscopically diagnosed as negative were Plasmodium-positive with nPCR. When compared to the microscopy, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of the nPCR were determined as 100, 97.2 and 73.3 %, respectively. nPCR was determined to be more sensitive and specific than microscopy.

Conclusions: This study revealed that the accurate diagnosis of malaria by nPCR was compulsory in malaria-endemic Sanliurfa and nPCR should be applied routinely in laboratory studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-016-1334-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4884379PMC
May 2016

[Evaluation of epidemiological data of malaria between 2001-2011 in Sanliurfa, Turkey].

Mikrobiyol Bul 2016 Apr;50(2):307-14

Harran University Vocational School of Health Services, Medical Laboratory Program, Department of Medical Microbiology, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Although Plasmodium vivax is the only cause of malaria cases detected in Turkey, an increase number of imported P.falciparum cases have begun to be observed recently. Sanliurfa is a province located at Southeastern region of Turkey where malaria is endemic and also one of the two largest malaria epidemics of Turkey was experienced with 84.345 cases in 1994. As this region has borders with countries like Iraq, Iran and Syria, cross border migration caused an increase in imported cases. In addition, climate change, alteration in temperature and humidity due to the Southeastern Anatolian Irrigation Project have led an increase in suitable breeding grounds for mosquitoes. Since new indigenous malaria cases, except imported ones are not detected in Sanliurfa nowadays, there is not enough data on the malaria epidemiology in this region including recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological data in connection with malaria cases observed in Sanliurfa which is a critical region for this infection for a 11-year-period, between the years of 2001 to 2011, retrospectively. Data obtained from the Malaria Control Unit of the Communicable Diseases Division of Sanliurfa Provincial Health Directorate were analized in terms of frequency of the cases, distribution of the cases in years and months, demographical characteristics, the source and species distribution of the parasite and the locations of the disease. A total of 1.149.196 blood smear samples have been examined during 11-year-period as part of surveillance programme and 4394 (0.4%) of them were positive for Plasmodium spp. The agent was P.vivax in 99.9% (4391/4394) of the cases, while in three cases (0.07%) who were diagnosed after 2010, it was P.falciparum. Of the patients 2351 (53.5%) were male and 2043 (46.5%) were female (p> 0.05), whose age ranging from 3 months to 80 years (mean age: 19.21 ± 16.12 years). The frequencies of the cases according to the age groups 0-11 months, 1-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years and 15 years were as follows; 2.5%, 15.1%, 18%, 13.9% and 50.5%, respectively. The detection of Plasmodium spp. in the samples examined in 2002 (1244/110.533; 1.1%) was the highest, and in 2011 (1/50.981; 0.002%) was the lowest. The distribution rates of 4394 cases according to the years between 2001 to 2011, were found as 25.4%, 28.3%, 17.8%, 10.9%, 8.9%, 5.6%, 1.4%, 1.4%, 0.2%, 0.009% and 0.02%, respectively. Of all cases, 80.6% were autochthonous and 19.4% were imported. Most of the cases were detected in Siverek county with a rate of 71.4%, followed by Ceylanpınar (13.5%) and Viranşehir (6.6%) counties. Although malaria cases were detected throughout the year in Sanliurfa in respect to the climate, the highest numbers were recorded in September (832/4394; 18.9%) and November (1054/4394; 24%). This study emphasized that malaria cases due to local transmission declined to zero in Sanliurfa like the recent situation in Turkey. However, P.falciparum malaria cases are being reported due to the travels to endemic countries or migrations from those countries. Effective malaria control attempts, within the scope of Malaria Elimination Programme implemented in Turkey, should be continued with the same stability without any abruption in Sanliurfa province where the disease had been endemic in the past.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5578/mb.21055DOI Listing
April 2016

Risk Factors and Relationship Between Intestinal Parasites and the Growth Retardation and Psychomotor Development Delays of Children in Şanlıurfa, Turkey.

Turkiye Parazitol Derg 2015 Dec;39(4):270-6

Department of Medical Microbiology, Harran University Vocational School of Health Services, Şanlıurfa, Turkey.

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors for and relationship among parasitic infections, growth retardation, and psychomotor developmental delays in children aged 6 years and below.

Methods: This case-control study was performed in Şanlıurfa in southeastern Turkey between October and December 2007. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, anthropometry, Ankara Development Screening Inventory, and laboratory analysis of stool specimens.

Results: The most common parasite was Giardia intestinalis (42.53%) followed by Enterobius vermicularis (27.58%), Ascaris lumbricoides (18.39%), Hymenolepis nana (5.75%), Trichuris trichiura (3.45%), Escherichia coli (1.15%), and Blastocystis spp. (1.15%). Fifty-eight percent of all children were infected with intestinal parasites; 55.2% had only one parasite, whereas 44.8% had multiple parasites. The children infected with G. intestinalis and other intestinal parasites had significantly higher levels of growth retardation and psychomotor development delay than non-infected children. Children with parasitic infections had growth delay up to 2.9 times, general development delay up to 1.9 times, language-cognitive development delay up to 2.2 times, and fine motor development delay up to 2.9 times higher than children without any parasitic infections. However, no significant relationship among intestinal parasites, gross motor development, social-self skills, and development delay was identified. The education level of parents, poor economic situation, number of households, not washing hands, playing with soil, family history of parasitic infection were the significant risk factors for intestinal parasites.

Conclusion: Our study indicates that the presence of either malnutrition or intestinal parasites may put a child in a high-risk group for developmental delays and growth retardation. Therefore, public health interventions can embrace nationwide deworming in children.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/tpd.2015.3620DOI Listing
December 2015

Prevalence and associated risk factors of intestinal parasites among children of farm workers in the southeastern Anatolian region of Turkey.

Ann Agric Environ Med 2015 ;22(3):438-42

Faculty of Medicine Medical Microbiology, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Objective: To determine the species, prevalence, and associated risk factors of intestinal parasites in farm workers' children in a representative sample in the southeastern Anatolian region of Turkey.

Materials And Method: A total of 333 farm workers' children, under the age of six years, were selected using the probability sampling method. Mean age of the children was 3.63 ± 0.5; 55.5% were female. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and laboratory analysis of faecal samples.

Results: The overall prevalence was 44.6% and the infected children had single, double, and triple parasitic infections at 72.3%, 23.0%, and 4.7%, respectively. The most common parasite was G. intestinalis (47.97%), followed by E. vermicularis (37.84%), T. saginata (27.03%), H. nana (12.16%), and A. lumbricoides (7.43%), respectively. Age, gender, illiteracy of the households, poverty, absence of toilets, bathrooms, and kitchens at the place of residence, lack of safe potable water, geophagia (soil eating habit), and being a child of a seasonal farmworker were the most significant factors associated with intestinal parasitic infection (P<0.05). G. intestinalis and E. vermicularis were found as the most common parasites that cause salivation, abdominal pain, and tiredness (P<0.05).

Conclusion: The study revealed that health education programmes for farm workers and farmers should be improved to increase awareness about living and working conditions, in order to control intestinal parasites. However, early diagnosis and treatment services for intestinal parasites should be provided by primary health care staff in the national child screening programme in agricultural populations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5604/12321966.1167709DOI Listing
July 2016

[Is the agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Sanliurfa changing? First cases of Leishmania major].

Turkiye Parazitol Derg 2014 Dec;38(4):270-4

Harran Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Tıbbi Mikrobiyoloji Anabilim Dalı, Şanlıurfa, Türkiye.

Today, almost 2 million new leishmaniasis cases are noted annually; 1.5 million of these are cutaneous (CL), and others are visceral leishmaniasis (VL). In Sanliurfa, CL cases caused by Leishmania tropica but not by other agents such as L. infantum and L. major. L. tropica is a unique parasite species in Sanliurfa and is the causative agent of anthroponotic CL (transmitted from human to vector to human). Our aim was to report 3 new CL cases due to L. major ( 2 autochthonous and 1 imported) identified in Sanliurfa. Lesion aspiration samples taken from patients were inoculated into NNN culture. Following successful isolation in NNN, promastigotes were obtained by mass culture using RPMI + 20% FCS medium. Parasites species were identified as L. major using ITS-1 PCR-RFLP analysis. This is the first report of autochthonous CL cases caused by L. major in Sanliurfa, and it is estimated that the number of such cases will increase in this region. Public health measures should be taken for L. major infections, while researchers should plan field studies to identify the vectors and reservoirs of L. major.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/tpd.2014.3820DOI Listing
December 2014

Epidemiology of hepatitis B in the reproductive-age female farmworkers of southeastern Turkey.

Hepat Mon 2014 Nov 23;14(11):e22120. Epub 2014 Nov 23.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Background: There are limited data on the prevalence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the agricultural population worldwide.

Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of HBV infection and associated risk factors in the reproductive-age female farmworker.

Materials And Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between January and April 2013 in southeastern region (SAR) of Turkey. A community-based representative agricultural sample (n = 705) from the agricultural areas of nine provinces of SAR was randomly determined by clustering method using Epi Info software. Questionnaires including demographic information and risk factors of HBV were administered to participants. The presence of HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, and anti-HBe antibodies in blood samples were measured by ELISA.

Results: The prevalence of the HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, anti-HBe antibodies, and seropositivity were 5.7%, 25.9%, 28.9%, 16.4%, and 36.7%, respectively. There was no association between the HBsAg and the size of the household, age, education level, parity, and place of birth while the prevalence of HBsAg was higher in seasonal migratory farmworkers and people living in urban areas and the prevalence of anti-HBs antibody was significantly higher in women ≥ 35 years of age, those with a high parity, and those who gave birth without the assistance of health professionals (P < 0.05). The risk for HBV infection in the seasonal migratory group was 4.3 times higher in comparison to local workers (P = 0.00; OR = 4.3; 95% CI, 2.2-8.4), with a prevalence rate of 11%.

Conclusions: The monitoring of at-risk groups like seasonal migratory farmworkers is necessary to strengthen the healthcare service provided to this population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/hepatmon.22120DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4286707PMC
November 2014

Prevalence and associated risk factors of Toxoplasma gondii in female farmworkers of southeastern Turkey.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2015 Jan 15;9(1):87-93. Epub 2015 Jan 15.

Vocational School of Health Services, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Introduction: There are a limited number of studies of the agricultural population about the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection throughout the world. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of toxoplasmosis in female farmworkers in the southeastern region of Turkey.

Methodology: The optimum sample size was determined using the Epi Info Program, and blood samples were collected from 684 women of reproductive age. Serum samples were analyzed by qualitative and quantitative methods for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies with a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Questionnaires through which socio-demographic information was collected were applied during face-to-face interviews of subjects who gave their consent to participate in the study. Crude odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and Chi-square analyses and logistic regression were performed.

Results: Of the 684 women, the prevalence of toxoplasmosis was determined to be 58.3% and 1% for IgG and IgM, respectively. Employment as a seasonal farmworker, increasing age, and having had three or more pregnancies were found to be the crucial associated risk factors that affect the prevalence of T. gondii infection (p < 0.05). In contrast to these, the provincial development level was found to be a confounding factor. There was no association between toxoplasmosis and household size, education attainment, and poverty in the bivariate analyses.

Conclusions: The findings show that control and serological screening programs should be implemented nationwide in Turkey for the reliable and fast detection of congenital Toxoplasma infections.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3855/jidc.5824DOI Listing
January 2015

[The effects of intestinal parasites on anemia of children].

Turkiye Parazitol Derg 2014 Jun;38(2):85-90

Harran Üniversitesi Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu, Tıbbi Mikrobiyoloji Anabilim Dalı, Şanlıurfa, Türkiye.

Objective: In this case-control epidemiological study, we aimed to investigate the effects of intestinal parasites on the anemia of children and show the association between intestinal parasites and anemia.

Methods: A total of 50 healthy and 50 malnourished children aged 0-72 months who went to physicians of Tilfindir Primary Health Care Center were enrolled in this study. The stool specimens were examined by using native-lugol, concentration, cellophane tape, and acid fast and trichrome staining methods. The complete blood count was measured by an automatic blood device.

Results: A total of 58% of the children were infected with intestinal parasites; 55.2% of these were infected with only one parasite, and 44.8% of them were infected with polyparasites. Also, 50.0% of the children with parasitic infection and 19.0% of children without parasitic infection were anemic. There was a positive association between intestinal parasites and anemia statistically (p<0.05). The mean hemoglobin level of the children with parasitic infection was 11.15±1.30, and the mean hemoglobin level of the children without parasitic infection was 12.13±1.47. There was a significant difference between mean hemoglobin levels of the two groups statistically (p<0.001).

Conclusion: Consequently, this study emphasized that intestinal parasites can affect the anemia of children adversely, and there was a positive association between intestinal parasites and anemia of children.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/tpd.2014.3149DOI Listing
June 2014

[Comparison of direct microcopy and antigen casette tests for the detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium].

Turkiye Parazitol Derg 2013 ;37(3):169-73

Harran Üniversitesi Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksekokulu, Tıbbi Mikrobiyoloji Anabilim Dalı, Şanlıurfa, Türkiye.

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the direct microscopy used for detection of intestinal parasites with antigen casette tests used in diagnosis of giardiasis and crypyosporidiasis.

Methods: Forty-six children who lived in the Şanlıurfa Orphanage were enrolled in this study. The stool specimens were taken in the morning and examined by using native-lugol, modified formalin-ethylacetate concentration methods and cellophane tape method on the same day at the Microbiology laboratory of Harran University. Also Kinyoun-acid fast stained preparations were used for the detection of Cryptosporidium. R-biopharm Cryptosporidium/Giardia casette antigen test was used for the determinaton of giardiasis and crytosporidiasis.

Results: The mean age of the children enrolled in this study was 8.61±3.45 and the distribution of gender was 24 female (52.2%), 22 male (47.8%), respectively. According to stool examinations, 9 of 46 examples (19.60%) were determined as Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp. had never been found. The result of the antigen screening casette test showed 9 of 46 samples (19.60%) were positive for G. intestinalis. Also Cryptosporidium spp. had never been found by the antigen casette test.

Conclusion: When we compared the results of the direct microscopy and antigen casette tests, we found no significant difference between them for test reliability (p > 0.05). Antigen tests have higher sensitivity (100%) and specifity (100%) than the modified acid-fast staining technique, therefore, it is a preferred reference method . However, an experienced staff working accurately might access the same conclusion. Considering the cost of antigen tests, direct microscopic examination is cheaper, andeasier when it used by an experienced person.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/tpd.2013.38DOI Listing
May 2014

An operational study on implementation of mobile primary healthcare services for seasonal migratory farmworkers, Turkey.

Matern Child Health J 2012 Dec;16(9):1906-12

Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, 63300 Yenişehir, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Maternal and child health is affected by exposure to unhealthy living and working conditions, by increased exposure to health hazards, and by poor utilization of primary healthcare services. The objective of this operational study was to implement mobile primary healthcare services (MPHS) for migratory seasonal farmworkers. This study, conducted in Şanlıurfa, Turkey, between March 2008 and April 2009, examined multiple stages of MPHS implementation in both a permanent settlement (336 children aged 5 and under; 580 women of reproductive age) and a working settlement (85 living units; 217 children and 257 women). The stages included: (1) identifying the problem, (2) identifying a potential solution and a quasi-experimental study to evaluate the effect of intervention, (3) utilizing and disseminating results to stakeholders, and (4) implementing sustainable MPHS county-wide. Rates of selected outcome measures, including full childhood and tetanus vaccination, phenylketonuria screening, and safer usage of pesticides, iodine salt, and sanitary toilet facilities, increased significantly following the intervention in both the permanent and temporary settlements (P < 0.05). The majority of cases of anemia (children: 16.6%, women: 17.8%) and parasitic infections (55.4%) were treated. The study results indicate that MPHS are necessary to ensure healthcare access for migratory farmworkers and to establish a stronger public health infrastructure for this risk group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-011-0941-3DOI Listing
December 2012