Publications by authors named "Ndiya Ogba"

20 Publications

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 2.2021.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2021 01 6;19(1):16-27. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

The NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of adults with AML based on clinical trials that have led to significant improvements in treatment, or have yielded new information regarding factors with prognostic importance, and are intended to aid physicians with clinical decision-making. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent select updates to the NCCN Guidelines, including familial genetic alterations in AML, postinduction or postremission treatment strategies in low-risk acute promyelocytic leukemia or favorable-risk AML, principles surrounding the use of venetoclax-based therapies, and considerations for patients who prefer not to receive blood transfusions during treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2021.0002DOI Listing
January 2021

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 2.2020.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2020 10 1;18(10):1312-1320. Epub 2020 Oct 1.

National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

The NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities as well as recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing sporadic CRC. They are intended to aid physicians with clinical decision-making regarding CRC screening for patients without defined genetic syndromes. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on select recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines, including a section on primary and secondary CRC prevention, and provide context for the panel's recommendations regarding the age to initiate screening in average risk individuals and follow-up for low-risk adenomas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2020.0048DOI Listing
October 2020

Hodgkin Lymphoma, Version 2.2020, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2020 06;18(6):755-781

30National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) provide recommendations for the management of adult patients with HL. The NCCN panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant data, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. Current management of classic HL involves initial treatment with chemotherapy alone or combined modality therapy followed by restaging with PET/CT to assess treatment response. Overall, the introduction of less toxic and more effective regimens has significantly advanced HL cure rates. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on the management of classic HL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2020.0026DOI Listing
June 2020

Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Version 2.2020, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2020 01;18(1):81-112

National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric malignancy. Advancements in technology that enhance our understanding of the biology of the disease, risk-adapted therapy, and enhanced supportive care have contributed to improved survival rates. However, additional clinical management is needed to improve outcomes for patients classified as high risk at presentation (eg, T-ALL, infant ALL) and who experience relapse. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for pediatric ALL provide recommendations on the workup, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of the disease, including guidance on supportive care, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and pharmacogenomics. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on the frontline and relapsed/refractory management of pediatric ALL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2020.0001DOI Listing
January 2020

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal, Version 2.2019.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 09;17(9):1032-1041

National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Identifying individuals with hereditary syndromes allows for improved cancer surveillance, risk reduction, and optimized management. Establishing criteria for assessment allows for the identification of individuals who are carriers of pathogenic genetic variants. The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal provide recommendations for the assessment and management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on criteria for the evaluation of Lynch syndrome and considerations for use of multigene testing in the assessment of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2019.0044DOI Listing
September 2019

Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 3.2019, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 06;17(6):721-749

National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia among adults and accounts for the largest number of annual deaths due to leukemias in the United States. Recent advances have resulted in an expansion of treatment options for AML, especially concerning targeted therapies and low-intensity regimens. This portion of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for AML focuses on the management of AML and provides recommendations on the workup, diagnostic evaluation and treatment options for younger (age <60 years) and older (age ≥60 years) adult patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2019.0028DOI Listing
June 2019

Guidelines Insights: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Version 1.2019.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 05;17(5):414-423

Moffitt Cancer Center.

Survival outcomes for older adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are poor and optimal management is challenging due to higher-risk leukemia genetics, comorbidities, and lower tolerance to intensive therapy. A critical understanding of these factors guides the selection of frontline therapies and subsequent treatment strategies. In addition, there have been recent developments in minimal/measurable residual disease (MRD) testing and blinatumomab use in the context of MRD-positive disease after therapy. These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines for ALL regarding upfront therapy in older adults and MRD monitoring/testing in response to ALL treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2019.0024DOI Listing
May 2019

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 09;16(9):1092-1106

Patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) cancers have a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. The recent approval of 2 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) autologous T-cell products for R/R B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment is setting the stage for what is possible in other diseases. However, there are important factors that must be considered, including patient selection, toxicity management, and costs associated with CAR T-cell therapy. To begin to address these issues, NCCN organized a task force consisting of a multidisciplinary panel of experts in oncology, cancer center administration, and health policy, which met for the first time in March 2018. This report describes the current state of CAR T-cell therapy and future strategies that should be considered as the application of this novel immunotherapy expands and evolves.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0073DOI Listing
September 2018

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 1.2018.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 08;16(8):939-949

The NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening outline various screening modalities as well as recommended screening strategies for individuals at average or increased-risk of developing sporadic CRC. The NCCN panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant data, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize 2018 updates to the NCCN Guidelines, with a primary focus on modalities used to screen individuals at average-risk for CRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0067DOI Listing
August 2018

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Neuroendocrine and Adrenal Tumors, Version 2.2018.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 06;16(6):693-702

The NCCN Guidelines for Neuroendocrine and Adrenal Tumors provide recommendations for the management of adult patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), adrenal gland tumors, pheochromocytomas, and paragangliomas. Management of NETs relies heavily on the site of the primary NET. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the management options and the 2018 updates to the guidelines for locoregional advanced disease, and/or distant metastasis originating from gastrointestinal tract, bronchopulmonary, and thymus primary NETs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0056DOI Listing
June 2018

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Hodgkin Lymphoma, Version 1.2018.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Mar;16(3):245-254

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) provide recommendations for the management of adult patients with HL. The NCCN Guidelines Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within the NCCN Member Institutions, examine relevant data, and reevaluate and update the recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize recent updates centered on treatment considerations for relapsed/refractory classic HL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0013DOI Listing
March 2018

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal, Version 3.2017.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2017 12;15(12):1465-1475

The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk syndromes associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The NCCN Panel for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal meets at least annually to assess comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant data, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on genes newly associated with CRC risk on multigene panels, the associated evidence, and currently recommended management strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2017.0176DOI Listing
December 2017

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Version 1.2017.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2017 09;15(9):1091-1102

The prognosis for patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved with the use of more intensive chemotherapy regimens, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, targeted agents, and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, the management of relapsed or refractory (R/R) ALL remains challenging and prognosis is poor. The NCCN Guidelines for ALL provide recommendations on standard treatment approaches based on current evidence. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize treatment recommendations for R/R ALL and highlight important updates, and provide a summary of the panel's discussion and underlying data supporting the most recent recommendations for R/R ALL management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2017.0147DOI Listing
September 2017

Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 3.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2017 07;15(7):926-957

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia among adults and accounts for the largest number of annual deaths due to leukemias in the United States. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for AML focuses on management and provides recommendations on the workup, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options for younger (age <60 years) and older (age ≥60 years) adult patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2017.0116DOI Listing
July 2017

Hodgkin Lymphoma Version 1.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2017 05;15(5):608-638

This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) focuses on the management of classical HL. Current management of classical HL involves initial treatment with chemotherapy or combined modality therapy followed by restaging with PET/CT to assess treatment response using the Deauville criteria (5-point scale). The introduction of less toxic and more effective regimens has significantly advanced HL cure rates. However, long-term follow-up after completion of treatment is essential to determine potential long-term effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2017.0064DOI Listing
May 2017

Luminal breast cancer metastases and tumor arousal from dormancy are promoted by direct actions of estradiol and progesterone on the malignant cells.

Breast Cancer Res 2014 Dec 5;16(6):489. Epub 2014 Dec 5.

Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 12801 E. 7th Avenue, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.

Introduction: Luminal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancers can metastasize but lie dormant for years before recurrences prove lethal. Understanding the roles of estrogen (E) or progestin (P) in development of luminal metastases or in arousal from dormancy is hindered by few preclinical models. We have developed such models.

Methods: Immunocompromised, ovariectomized (ovx'd) mice were intracardiac-injected with luminal or basal human breast cancer cells. Four lines were tested: luminal ER(+)PR(+) cytokeratin 5-negative (CK5(-)) E3 and MCF-7 cells, basal ER(-)PR(-)CK5(+) estrogen withdrawn-line 8 (EWD8) cells, and basal ER(-)PR(-)CK5(-) MDA-MB-231 cells. Development of micrometastases or macrometastases was quantified in ovx'd mice and in mice supplemented with E or P or both. Metastatic deposits were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for luminal, basal, and proliferation markers.

Results: ER(-)PR(-) cells generated macrometastases in multiple organs in the absence or presence of hormones. By contrast, ovx'd mice injected with ER(+)PR(+) cells appeared to be metastases-free until they were supplemented with E or E+P. Furthermore, unlike parental ER(+)PR(+)CK5(-) cells, luminal metastases were heterogeneous, containing a significant (6% to 30%) proportion of non-proliferative ER(-)PR(-)CK5(+) cells that would be chemotherapy-resistant. Additionally, because these cells lack receptors, they would also be endocrine therapy-resistant. With regard to ovx'd control mice injected with ER(+)PR(+) cells that appeared to be metastases-free, systematic pathologic analysis of organs showed that some harbor a reservoir of dormant micrometastases that are ER(+) but PR(-). Such cells may also be endocrine therapy- and chemotherapy-resistant. Their emergence as macrometastases can be triggered by E or E+P restoration.

Conclusions: We conclude that hormones promote development of multi-organ macrometastases in luminal disease. The metastases display a disturbing heterogeneity, containing newly emergent ER(-)PR(-) subpopulations that would be resistant to endocrine therapy and chemotherapy. Similar cells are found in luminal metastases of patients. Furthermore, lack of hormones is not protective. While no overt metastases form in ovx'd mice, luminal tumor cells can seed distant organs, where they remain dormant as micrometastases and sheltered from therapies but arousable by hormone repletion. This has implications for breast cancer survivors or women with occult disease who are prescribed hormones for contraception or replacement purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13058-014-0489-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4303198PMC
December 2014

HEXIM1 down-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein stability.

Biochem J 2013 Dec;456(2):195-204

*Department of Pharmacology, Division of General Medical Science and Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, U.S.A.

We have previously reported on the inhibition of HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor α)-regulated pathways by HEXIM1 [HMBA (hexamethylene-bis-acetamide)-inducible protein 1]. Disruption of HEXIM1 activity in a knock-in mouse model expressing a mutant HEXIM1 protein resulted in increased susceptibility to the development of mammary tumours, partly by up-regulation of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression, HIF-1α expression and aberrant vascularization. We now report on the mechanistic basis for HEXIM1 regulation of HIF-1α. We observed direct interaction between HIF-1α and HEXIM1, and HEXIM1 up-regulated hydroxylation of HIF-1α, resulting in the induction of the interaction of HIF-1α with pVHL (von Hippel-Lindau protein) and ubiquitination of HIF-1α. The up-regulation of hydroxylation involves HEXIM1-mediated induction of PHD3 (prolyl hydroxylase 3) expression and interaction of PHD3 with HIF-1α. Acetylation of HIF-1α has been proposed to result in increased interaction of HIF-1α with pVHL and induced pVHL-mediated ubiquitination, which leads to the proteasomal degradation of HIF-1α. HEXIM1 also attenuated the interaction of HIF-1α with HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1), resulting in acetylation of HIF-1α. The consequence of HEXIM1 down-regulation of HIF-1α protein expression is attenuated expression of HIF-1α target genes in addition to VEGF and inhibition of HIF-1α-regulated cell invasion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BJ20130592DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4430322PMC
December 2013

HEXIM1 regulates 17beta-estradiol/estrogen receptor-alpha-mediated expression of cyclin D1 in mammary cells via modulation of P-TEFb.

Cancer Res 2008 Sep;68(17):7015-24

Department of Pharmacology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) plays a key role in mammary gland development and is implicated in breast cancer through the transcriptional regulation of genes linked to proliferation and apoptosis. We previously reported that hexamethylene bisacetamide inducible protein 1 (HEXIM1) inhibits the activity of ligand-bound ERalpha and bridges a functional interaction between ERalpha and positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). To examine the consequences of a functional HEXIM1-ERalpha-P-TEFb interaction in vivo, we generated MMTV/HEXIM1 mice that exhibit mammary epithelial-specific and doxycycline-inducible expression of HEXIM1. Increased HEXIM1 expression in the mammary gland decreased estrogen-driven ductal morphogenesis and inhibited the expression of cyclin D1 and serine 2 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (S2P RNAP II). In addition, increased HEXIM1 expression in MCF-7 cells led to a decrease in estrogen-induced cyclin D1 expression, whereas down-regulation of HEXIM1 expression led to an enhancement of estrogen-induced cyclin D1 expression. Studies on the mechanism of HEXIM1 regulation on estrogen action indicated a decrease in estrogen-stimulated recruitment of ERalpha, P-TEFb, and S2P RNAP II to promoter and coding regions of ERalpha-responsive genes pS2 and CCND1 with increased HEXIM1 expression in MCF-7 cells. Notably, increased HEXIM1 expression decreased only estrogen-induced P-TEFb activity. Whereas there have been previous reports on HEXIM1 inhibition of P-TEFb activity, our studies add a new dimension by showing that E(2)/ER is an important regulator of the HEXIM1/P-TEFb functional unit in breast cells. Together, these studies provide novel insight into the role of HEXIM1 and ERalpha in mammary epithelial cell function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-08-0814DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2831806PMC
September 2008

The breast cell growth inhibitor, estrogen down regulated gene 1, modulates a novel functional interaction between estrogen receptor alpha and transcriptional elongation factor cyclin T1.

Oncogene 2005 Aug;24(36):5576-88

Department of Pharmacology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) regulates transcription of specific genes and is believed to play a major role in breast tumorigenesis. We previously identified estrogen down regulated gene 1 (EDG1 (also known as HEXIM1)) using the C-terminus of ERalpha (E/F domain) as bait in yeast two-hybrid screenings. Here we report on the role of EDG1 as a coregulator of ERalpha transcriptional activity. We observe an interaction between EDG1 and ERalpha. EDG1 inhibits the transcriptional activity of ERalpha and this is dependent upon the C-terminus of EDG1. The C-terminus of EDG1/HEXIM1 was recently shown to inhibit the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) by interacting with the cyclin T1 subunit. Here we show that ERalpha interacts with cyclin T1, cyclin T1 and ER co-occupancy on the promoter region of an ER target gene, and that this interaction plays an important role in ERalpha-induced gene expression. The interaction of ERalpha with cyclin T1 also allows ERalpha to compete with EDG1 for cyclin T1, and may release cyclin T1 from EDG1 repression. Conversely, increased EDG1 expression results in inhibition of cyclin T1 recruitment and ERalpha DNA binding. Our results support a novel functional interaction between ERalpha and cyclin T1 that is modulated by EDG1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.onc.1208728DOI Listing
August 2005

Differential effects of fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene in MCF-7 cells.

J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng 2005 ;40(5):927-36

Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Health Science, Benedict College, Columbia, South Carolina 29204, USA.

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants, which are suspected carcinogens and may affect the reproductive system as potential endocrine disruptors. Therefore, we tested fluoranthene (FL) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) on human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 cells) to determine possible toxic effects. The cells were incubated in the presence of medium, medium containing 0.1% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as vehicle, or in the presence of FL (10, 50, and 100 microg/ml), BaP (10, 50, and 100 microg/ml), 17beta-estradiol (E2; 5 microg/ml and 500 ng/ml), or tamoxifen (Tx; 5 microg/ml and 500 ng/ml). After 24 h, FL (100 microg/ml), BaP (100 microg/ml), or Tx (5 microg/ml) killed significant numbers of cells. After 72 h, FL (50 and 100 microg/ml), BaP (100 microg/ml), E2 (5 microg/ml), or Tx (5 microg/ml and 500 ng/ml) decreased MCF-7 cell viability significantly as demonstrated by the MTT assay. Measurement of DNA synthesis was conducted using 3H-thymidine incorporation into MCF-7 cell DNA for 72 h. After 72 h, BaP (10, 50, and 100 microg/ml) and Tx (5 microg/ml and 500 ng/ml) significantly decreased DNA synthesis in MCF-7 cells. FL did not significantly alter 3H-thymidine incorporation into the cells. While higher concentration of E2 (5 microg/ml) decreased 3H-thymidine incorporation, the lower concentration of E2 (500 ng/ml) increased cell proliferation. Apoptotic response was tested by in situ fluorescence staining of cells incubated for 72 h in media containing 0.1% DMSO, or vehicle containing FL (10 microg/ml), BaP (10 microg/ml), E2 (500 ng/ml), or Tx (500 ng/ml). Microscopic examination demonstrated presence of apoptosis with BaP (10 microg/ml) and Tx (500 ng/ml), but not with FL (10 microg/ml) and E2 (500 ng/ml). The cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry demonstrated that E2 (500 ng/ml) did not significantly change the progression of MCF-7 cells after 72 h of incubation. However, FL (10 microg/ml) only suppressed G2/M phase. Tx (500 ng/ml) blocked G0/G1, S, and G2/M phases, and BaP (10 microg/ml) suppressed the G0/G1 phase. These data suggest that BaP on MCF-7 cells is growth inhibitory and apoptotic, whereas the toxic effects of FL are not exerted through apoptosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1081/ese-200056110DOI Listing
July 2005