Publications by authors named "Nazanin Abbaspour"

5 Publications

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Dried Plum Consumption Improves Total Cholesterol and Antioxidant Capacity and Reduces Inflammation in Healthy Postmenopausal Women.

J Med Food 2021 May 11. Epub 2021 May 11.

School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, USA.

Dried plums contain bioactive components that have demonstrated antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to determine if dried plum consumption reduces the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in postmenopausal women, specifically examining lipid profiles, oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, and inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. We conducted a 6-month, parallel-design controlled clinical trial, where 48 postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to consume 0, 50, or 100 g of dried plum each day. After 6 months of intervention, total cholesterol (TC) in the 100 g/day treatment group ( = .002) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the 50 g/day treatment group ( = .005) improved significantly compared to baseline. Inflammatory biomarkers interleukin-6 ( = .044) and tumor necrosis factor- ( = .040) were significantly lower after 6 months within the 50 g/day dried plum group compared to baseline. Moreover, total antioxidant capacity increased significantly within the 50 g/day group ( = .046), and superoxide dismutase activity increased significantly within both 50 and 100 g/day groups ( = .044 and  = .027, respectively) after 6 months compared to baseline. In addition, plasma activities of alanine transaminase ( = .046), lactate dehydrogenase ( = .039), and creatine kinase ( = .030) were significantly lower after 6 months in the 50 g/day dried plum group. These findings suggest that daily consumption of 50-100 g dried plum improves CVD risk factors in postmenopausal women as exhibited by lower TC, oxidative stress, and inflammatory markers with no clear dose dependence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2020.0142DOI Listing
May 2021

Mixed Nut Consumption May Improve Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Overweight and Obese Adults.

Nutrients 2019 Jun 29;11(7). Epub 2019 Jun 29.

School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA.

Emerging research indicates that nuts are a source of health-promoting compounds demonstrating cardioprotective benefits. However, most studies have assessed the effect of single nuts rather than a nut mixture. The objective of this study was, therefore, to examine the effect of mixed-nut consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in overweight and obese adults. In a randomized, parallel-arm, controlled trial, 48 participants consumed isocaloric (250 kcal) amounts of pretzels or mixed-nuts. Body weight (BW) ( = 0.024), BMI ( = 0.043), and insulin levels ( = 0.032) were significantly lower in the nut group compared to the pretzel group. Mixed-nut consumption also significantly reduced glucose ( = 0.04) and insulin ( = 0.032) levels after 4 and 8 weeks compared to baseline, respectively. Lactate dehydrogenase of the nut group was significantly lower than the pretzel group ( = 0.002). No significant differences were detected between groups for triglycerides, LDL-C, and HDL-C. However, pretzel consumption increased triglycerides ( = 0.048) from 4 weeks to 8 weeks. Moreover, LDL-C increased ( = 0.038) while HDL-C transiently decreased ( = 0.044) from baseline to 4 weeks. No significant lipid changes were detected within the nut group. Our results suggest that supplementing the diet with mixed-nuts could improve CVD risk factors by improving BW and glucose regulation in comparison to a common carbohydrate-rich snack without promoting the negative effects on lipids detected with pretzels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu11071488DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6683273PMC
June 2019

Modeling Zinc Intake for Intervention and Scenario Analysis.

Food Nutr Bull 2015 Jun;36(2):89-101

ETH Zurich, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: A large number of illnesses, afflicting one-third of the world's population, have been attributed to zinc deficiency. Inadequate dietary intake of bioavailable forms of zinc is considered the most frequent cause of zinc deficiency, which is most common in arid regions of developing countries.

Objective: To employ a modeling approach in a test population to analyze how best to eliminate zinc deficiency using different plausible dietary scenarios.

Methods: A comprehensive database was built upon food consumption patterns of two population groups residing in a village and a suburb in semiarid central Iran near Isfahan city. A database was created on zinc and phytic acid concentrations of different foods and ingredients consumed by the study populations. A zinc intake model was constructed and parameterized accounting for bioavailability and model input uncertainties.

Results: The zinc intake of about one-third of both study populations, which did not differ significantly in their rates of zinc deficiency, was below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for zinc. Scenario analyses predicted that at the current rate of food consumption, it would take up to 60 years for 97.5% of the population to meet their zinc EARs. Fortification of wheat flour and biofortification of wheat grains would result in 93% and 88% of the population, respectively, achieving their EARs in 15 years.

Conclusions: The modeled results suggest that fortification and biofortification are the most effective and sustainable strategies to combat zinc deficiency. The methodology developed in this study is general and is shown to be a useful tool for the analysis of possible future trends and intervention scenarios.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0379572115586399DOI Listing
June 2015

Zinc status as compared to zinc intake and iron status: a case study of Iranian populations from Isfahan province.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res 2013 ;83(6):335-45

ETH Zurich, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Zurich, Switzerland.

The aim of this study was to estimate the zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) status of different age groups in rural (Rooran) and suburban (Khomeini Shahr) populations in central Iran, to relate the Zn status to Zn intake from animal and plant foods, and to examine the relationship between Zn and Fe status. Blood samples from 341 subjects including preschool children (27), schoolchildren (157), women (91), and men (66) were analyzed for serum zinc (SZn), serum ferritin (SF), total C-reactive protein, and hemoglobin. Daily Zn and phytic acid (PA) intakes from major food groups were estimated using a 3-day weighed food record. The overall prevalence of Zn deficiency based on low SZn was 5.9 % in Rooran and 7.2 % in Khomeini Shahr. Anemia was higher in the village than in the suburb (33.5 % vs. 22.7 %; p = 0.04) and almost half of the anemia in Khomeini Shahr and 36 % in Rooran was associated with iron deficiency (ID) based on low SF. The PA:Zn molar ratio in the diet was 10 - 13, indicating a diet of moderate Zn bioavailability. About 18 % of the population consumed less Zn than their WHO Estimated Average Requirements. There was no association between Zn status and Fe status. The modest prevalence of Zn deficiency in the study populations can be explained by a relatively high Zn intake from animal source foods. Anemia however is a serious public health problem affecting some 30 % of the subjects, with almost half due to ID. The lower Fe status than Zn status could be due to the frequent consumption of tea and dairy products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0300-9831/a000175DOI Listing
February 2015

Review on iron and its importance for human health.

J Res Med Sci 2014 Feb;19(2):164-74

Child Growth and Development Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

It is well-known that deficiency or over exposure to various elements has noticeable effects on human health. The effect of an element is determined by several characteristics, including absorption, metabolism, and degree of interaction with physiological processes. Iron is an essential element for almost all living organisms as it participates in a wide variety of metabolic processes, including oxygen transport, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, and electron transport. However, as iron can form free radicals, its concentration in body tissues must be tightly regulated because in excessive amounts, it can lead to tissue damage. Disorders of iron metabolism are among the most common diseases of humans and encompass a broad spectrum of diseases with diverse clinical manifestations, ranging from anemia to iron overload, and possibly to neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss the latest progress in studies of iron metabolism and bioavailability, and our current understanding of human iron requirement and consequences and causes of iron deficiency. Finally, we discuss strategies for prevention of iron deficiency.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3999603PMC
February 2014