Publications by authors named "Naveed Zafar"

5 Publications

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Vitex Rotundifolia Fractions Induced Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer T-47D Cell Line via Activation of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathway.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2019 Dec 1;20(12):3555-3562. Epub 2019 Dec 1.

Institute of Marine Biotechnology, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia.

Objective: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects and mechanism of cell death induced by the extract and fractions of Vitex rotundifolia (leaves) in breast cancer cell line, T-47D.

Methods: The cytotoxicity activity was measured using MTS assay. The mode of cell death was analysed by early (phosphatidylserine externalization) and late apoptosis (DNA fragmentation). The caspases 8, 9, 3/7 and apoptotic proteins bax, bcl-2 study were done by western blot and ELISA method.

Results: The methanol extract was found to inhibit 50% growth of T-47D cells at the concentration of 79.43µg/ml respectively after 72hr. From seven fractions, fraction F1, F2 and F3 produced cytotoxicity effects in T-47D cell line with IC50 (72hr) < 30µg/ml. The results obtained by Annexin V/PI apoptosis detection assay and TUNEL assay suggest that active fractions of  Vitex rotundifolia induced early and late apoptosis (DNA fragmentation) in T-47D cell line. Moreover, western blot analysis and Caspase GloTM luminescent assay demonstrated that fractions F2 and F3 triggered apoptotic cell death via activation of caspases -8, -9 and -3/7 and up-regulation of  Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein.  Furthermore, chemical profiling confirms the presence of potential metabolites (vitexicarpin) in fractions of Vitex rotundifolia.

Conclusion: Thus, the present study suggests the remarkable potential of active metabolites in fractions of Vitex rotundifolia as future cancer therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.31557/APJCP.2019.20.12.3555DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7173364PMC
December 2019

Corrigendum to "Synthesis, structure-activity relationship and molecular docking studies of 3-O-flavonol glycosides as cholinesterase inhibitors" [Bioorg. Med. Chem. 26 (12) (2018) 3696-3706].

Bioorg Med Chem 2018 07 5;26(13):3860. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

H. E. J. Research Institute of Chemistry, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270, Pakistan; Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Institute for Research and Medical Consultations (IRMC), Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, P.O. Box 31441, Dammam, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2018.07.002DOI Listing
July 2018

Controlled translocation of palladium(II) within a 22 ring atom macrocyclic ligand.

Dalton Trans 2014 Dec;43(45):17006-16

School of Chemical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.

Double aza-Michael addition of n-butylamine to the two acrylamide groups of acyclic N(2),N(6)-bis(6-acrylamidopyridin-2-yl)pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide gives the corresponding macrocycle, H₄L. H₄L has potential coordination pockets associated with the 2,6-dicarboxamide (head) and the butylamine (tail) regions of the macrocycle. Depending on the conditions employed, macrocyclic complexes with palladium(II) coordinated to either the tail or the head of the macrocycle can be isolated. Thus, treatment of H₄L with [PdCl2(NCPh)2] and sodium acetate, or [Pd(OAc)2] gives the closely related "tail-coordinated" complexes [PdCl(H3L)] (3a) or [Pd(OAc)(H3L)] (3b), respectively. However, employment of the bases 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) or pyridine during the treatment of H₄L with [Pd(OAc)2] results in the "head-coordinated" complexes [Pd(NH2R)(H2L)] (NH2R = N-(3-aminopropyl)caprolactam, which is formed by hydrolysis of DBU) (5) or [Pd(OH2)(H2L)] (6), respectively. Translocation of the palladium ion from the macrocycle tail in 3b to the head occurs on treatment with either DBU or N-(3-aminopropyl)caprolactam. In both cases the product 5 is formed. The aqua ligand in 6 is labile and easily displaced by the N-donor ligands n-butylamine, N-(3-aminopropyl)caprolactam or DBU to give the corresponding complexes [Pd(NH2(n)Bu)(H2L)] (4), (5), or [Pd(DBU)(H2L)] (7). The data suggest that hydrolysis of DBU to produce the N-(3-aminopropyl)caprolactam ligand in 5 is catalysed by the acetic acid formed during ligand metallation rather than by coordination to palladium. The X-ray crystal structures of H₄L, 5, and 6 are reported.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4dt00765dDOI Listing
December 2014

Laparoscopic loop ileostomy reversal: reducing morbidity while improving functional outcomes.

JSLS 2011 Oct-Dec;15(4):475-9

Texas Endosurgery Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA.

Introduction: Loop ileostomy reduces the morbidity associated with pelvic sepsis. However, its reversal carries a 10% to 30% complication rate. We present our technique for laparoscopic ileostomy closure.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of subjects undergoing laparoscopic-assisted loop ileostomy closure between 2006 and 2009. Operating time, length of hospital stay, return of bowel function, and complication rates were assessed.

Results: There were 24 (13 males) patients. Average age was 63 with a BMI of 25.9. Eighteen (75%) had a planned loop ileostomy, and 6 (25%) were emergent. Average time to reversal was 135 days. Average length of surgery was 79 minutes (range, 48 to 186), average stay was 4 days and return to bowel function was 3.6 days. We had no wound infections. Our complication rate was 29% (n=7), and reoperation rate was 12.5% (n=3). Only 1 major complication occurred, an anastomotic dehiscence.

Conclusion: A thorough, well-visualized lysis of adhesions and mobilization of the stoma and surrounding small bowel is the main advantage of our approach. We had no wound infections and no reoperation for bowel obstruction, which we feel is a direct advantage of our technique. Our complication rate and surgical time are comparable to those of the open technique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4293/108680811X13176785203950DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3340955PMC
August 2012

Extending the range of neutral N-donor ligands available for metal catalysts: N-[1-alkylpyridin-4(1H)-ylidene]amides in palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

Inorg Chem 2011 Nov 30;50(21):10522-4. Epub 2011 Sep 30.

School of Chemical Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

N-[1-Alkylpyridin-4(1H)-ylidene]amides (PYAs) are a new class of easily prepared, neutral N-donor ligands that share some features in common with N-heterocyclic carbenes. They are strongly electron-donating toward metal centers, and a palladium(II) complex of one of these ligands has been shown to successfully catalyze both the Heck-Mizoroki and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic201527sDOI Listing
November 2011