Publications by authors named "Nattira On-Nom"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Influence of Plant Origins and Seasonal Variations on Nutritive Values, Phenolics and Antioxidant Activities of Craib., an Endangered Species from Thailand.

Foods 2021 Nov 14;10(11). Epub 2021 Nov 14.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Craib. is an indigenous plant found in Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam that has become threatened owing to lack of knowledge about its agricultural management. This plant is now rare in the wild and was registered in the Plant Genetic Conservation Project under the initiation of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn (RSPG) to promote sustainable conservation and optimally beneficial utilization. has a long history of utilization as a nutrient-rich source with medicinal properties but scientific evidence of the veracity of these claims is limited. Here, the nutritional compositions, phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of different plant parts (young shoots and old leaves) of were investigated using plants collected from four areas of Thailand as Kamphaeng Phet (KP), Muang Nakhon Ratchasima (MN), Pakchong Nakhon Ratchasima (PN) and Uthai Thani (UT) at different harvesting periods (March-April, May-June and July-August). Results indicated that young shoots provided higher energy, protein, fat, dietary fiber, phosphorus, sodium, and zinc than old leaves. By contrast, nutrients such as total sugar, vitamin C, carotenoids, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and iron contents were higher in old leaves that also exhibited higher phenolic contents and most antioxidant activities than young shoots. Generally, most nutrients, phenolic contents, and antioxidant activities exhibited no clear trend among different plant origins. The harvesting period of July-August provided a suitable climate for biosynthesis of most nutrients, while high phenolics were mainly found in samples harvested in March-April. No clear trend was observed in the prevalence of antioxidant activities that varied according to assay techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10112799DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8623237PMC
November 2021

In Vitro Phytotherapeutic Properties of Aqueous Extracted Craib. towards Civilization Diseases.

Molecules 2021 Feb 18;26(4). Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Craib. is an indigenous edible plant that became an endangered species due to limited consumption of the local population with unknown reproduction and growth conditions. The plant is used as a traditional herb; however, its health applications lack scientific-based evidence. Craib. plant parts (old leaves and young shoots) from four areas as Kamphaeng Phet (KP), Muang Nakhon Ratchasima (MN), Pakchong Nakhon Ratchasima (PN), and Uthai Thani (UT) origins were investigated for phenolic compositions and in vitro health properties through the inhibition of key enzymes relevant to obesity (lipase), diabetes (α-glucosidase and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV), Alzheimer's disease (cholinesterases and β-secretase), and hypertension (angiotensin-converting enzyme). Phenolics including -coumaric acid, sinapic acid, naringenin, and apigenin were detected in old leaves and young shoots in all plant origins. Old leaves exhibited higher total phenolic contents (TPCs) and total flavonoid contents (TFCs), leading to higher enzyme inhibitory activities than young shoots. Besides, PN and MN with higher TPCs and TFCs tended to exhibit greater enzyme inhibitory activities than others. These results will be useful to promote this plant as a healthy food with valuable medicinal capacities to support its consumption and agricultural stimulation, leading to sustainable conservation of this endangered species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules26041082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7922288PMC
February 2021

Phenolic Profiles, Antioxidant, and Inhibitory Activities of (Roxb.) Craib and (Lem.) A.C. Sm.

Foods 2020 Sep 2;9(9). Epub 2020 Sep 2.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

spp. in the Schisandraceae family are woody vine plants, which produce edible red fruits that are rich in nutrients and antioxidant activities. Despite their valuable food applications, spp. are only able to grow naturally in the forest, and reproduction handled by botanists is still in progress with a very low growth rate. Subsequently, spp. were listed as endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) in 2011. Two different spp., including (Lem.) A.C. Sm. and (Roxb.) Craib, are mostly found in northern Thailand. These rare, wild fruits are unrecognizable to outsiders, and there have only been limited investigations into its biological properties. This study, therefore, aimed to comparatively investigate the phenolic profiles, antioxidant activities, and inhibitory activities against the key enzymes involved in diabetes (α-glucosidase and α-amylase) and Alzheimer's disease (acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and beta-secretase 1 (BACE-1)) in different fruit parts (exocarp, mesocarp (edible part), seed, and core) of (Lem.) A.C. Sm. and (Roxb.) Craib. The results suggested that Kadsura spp. extracts were rich in flavonol (quercetin), flavanone (naringenin), anthocyanidins (cyanidin and delphinidin), and anthocyanins (cyanidin 3--glucoside (kuromanin), cyanidin 3--galactoside (ideain), cyanidin 3--rutinoside (keracyanin), and cyanidin 3,5-di--glucoside (cyanin)). These flavonoids were found to be responsible for the high antioxidant activities and key enzyme inhibitions detected in spp. extracts. The findings of the present study can support further development of spp. as a potential source of phenolics and anti-oxidative agents with health benefits against diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Besides, exocarp and the core of Kadsura spp. exhibited higher phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and key enzyme inhibitory activities compared to the mesocarp and seeds, respectively. This information can promote the use of fruit parts other than the edible mesocarp for future food applications using spp. rather than these being wasted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods9091222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7555767PMC
September 2020

The Effect of Sacred Lotus () and Its Mixtures on Phenolic Profiles, Antioxidant Activities, and Inhibitions of the Key Enzymes Relevant to Alzheimer's Disease.

Molecules 2020 Aug 14;25(16). Epub 2020 Aug 14.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Sacred lotus () has long been used as a food source and ingredient for traditional herbal remedies. Plant parts contain neuroprotective agents that interact with specific targets to inhibit Alzheimer's disease (AD). Organic solvents including methanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, and -butanol, are widely employed for extraction of sacred lotus but impact food safety. Seed embryo, flower stalk, stamen, old leaf, petal, and leaf stalk of sacred lotus were extracted using hot water (aqueous extraction). The extractions were analyzed for their bioactive constituents, antioxidant and anti-AD properties as key enzyme inhibitory activities toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-secretase 1 (BACE-1). Results showed that the sacred lotus stamen exhibited significant amounts of phenolics, including phenolic acids and flavonoids, that contributed to high antioxidant activity via both single electron transfer (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms, with anti-AChE, anti-BChE, and anti-BACE-1 activities. To enhance utilization of other sacred lotus parts, a combination of stamen, old leaf and petal as the three sacred lotus plant components with the highest phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and enzyme inhibitory properties was analyzed. Antagonist interaction was observed, possibly from flavonoids-flavonoids interaction. Further in-depth elucidation of this issue is required. Findings demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the stamen has potential for application as a functional food to mitigate the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25163713DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7463813PMC
August 2020

Nutritional composition of conserved spp. plants in Northern Thailand.

Heliyon 2020 Jul 16;6(7):e04451. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon, Nakhon Pathom, 73170, Thailand.

The genus comprises woody vine plants belonging to the family . Species are found mostly in Northern Thailand and widely consumed by the local population. Occurrences of these wild fruits are rare as they only grow naturally in forest areas. Nutritive values of spp. remain unclear, leading to improper management for food applications. Nutritional composition of spp. was evaluated to promote sustainable conservation. Nutritive values in different fruits parts (exocarp, mesocarp, seed and core) of two species as (Lem.) A.C. Sm. and (Roxb.) Craib, from Chiang Rai Province, Thailand were assessed. When comparing nutritional contents based on per 100 g dry weight, results suggested that exhibited higher carbohydrate (1-2 times), sugar (1-2 times) and vitamin C (3-4 times) contents than , while the latter possessed higher fat (1-2 times), protein (1.6-1.9 times), and dietary fiber (1.5-1.8 times) contents. Considering each fruit part, the mesocarp (the only edible fruit part) and exocarp of both species provided high dietary fiber (11.6-20.9% recommended dietary fiber) and vitamin C (as high as 73% recommended per day) but were low in energy (30-40 kcal/100 g fresh weight), protein (0.6-1.2% recommended per day), fat (0.5-1.8% recommended per day) and sugar (2.4-5.4% recommended per day). Interestingly, seed contained higher energy (1-2 times), protein (2-3 times) and fat (4-50 times) than the other fruit parts. Results support the potential consumption of spp. as a healthy fruit that can be used for future food applications. Seed and exocarp from spp. also showed potential for new product development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e04451DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7365980PMC
July 2020

Correlation of vitamin D binding protein gene polymorphism and protein levels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with non-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subjects.

Per Med 2018 09 27;15(5):371-379. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, 999 Phutthamonthon 4 Rd., Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Aim: The risk of vitamin D binding protein (DBP) variations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared with non-COPD Thai males were investigated.

Materials & Methods: The rs7041 and rs4588 polymorphisms of the DBP gene and protein level were measured in 136 COPD and 68 non-COPD Thai males.

Results: In the COPD group, GC1-1 gave increased forced expiratory volume at 1 s % predicted compared with GC1-2 but with no significant difference. Significantly lower average DBP serum levels were observed in COPD than non-COPD subjects. Positive correlation between serum DBP and forced expiratory volume at 1 s % predicted was observed in non-COPD subjects.

Discussion & Conclusion: DBP variations might be associated with risk factors in COPD caused by both inflammatory and vitamin D circulation processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/pme-2018-0005DOI Listing
September 2018

The Effect of Coconut Jelly with Stevia as a Natural Sweetener on Blood Glucose, Insulin and C-Peptide Responses in Twelve Healthy Subjects.

Recent Pat Food Nutr Agric 2018 ;9(2):127-133

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, 999 Phutthamonthon 4 Rd., Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Background: Coconut jelly is a popular dessert among Asian people. However, it contains high levels of sugar. The recent patents on steviol glycoside (WO2015014969A1), steviol glycoside compositions for oral ingestion or use (WO2017095932A1) and sweetener composition for preventing and improving obesity, containing glycolysis inhibitor ingredient (EP2756764B1) help to select the sweetener for development of coconut jelly.

Objective: Therefore, the purposes of this study were to develop a healthier coconut jelly formula by using stevia as a natural sweetener as well as to investigate the short-term effects of Modified Coconut Jelly (MCJ) compared to Control Formula (CCJ) consumption on glycemic and insulin responses in twelve healthy participants.

Methods: The sensory evaluation found that MCJ with 50% sugar replacement using stevia obtained the highest acceptability score compared to other formulas. In a cross-over design, participants were required to consume MCJ and CCJ containing 50 g of available carbohydrates. Blood samples were collected at 0 (baseline), 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes for postprandial blood glucose, insulin, and C-peptide.

Results: The incremental Areas Under the Curve (iAUC) of blood glucose and insulin of MCJ had a lower trend than CCJ by 15.7 and 5.4 percent, respectively. MCJ consumption had blood glucose slowly decline after 60 to 120 minute. MCJ tended to decrease in postprandial blood glucose level without inducing insulin secretion.

Conclusion: This might be an effect of stevia. Nutrient composition is lower in total sugar and higher in fiber, which has been reported as antihyperglycemia in humans. Therefore, MCJ might be an optional food product for healthy people or patients with Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes mellitus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/2212798410666180717163852DOI Listing
January 2019

Impact of Genetic Polymorphism on LDL-C Response to Plant Stanol Ester Intake.

J Med Assoc Thai 2016 Jun;99(6):723-31

Background: The high blood cholesterol level could be prevented by plant stanol ester (Staest) consumption. In addition, the genetic polymorphism of cholesterol transporters might be related with lipid profile and subsequently response to Staest intake.

Objective: To investigate the effect of single nucleotide polymorphism in ATP-binding cassette hetero-dimeric G5/G8 (ABCG5/G8) and Niemann-Pick C1 Like1 protein (NPC1L1) gene on LDL-C response subsequent to plant Staest intake in Thai Subjects.

Material And Method: The blood samples were collected from 113 subjects for genotyping. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ABCG5/G8 positions; rs6720173 (Q604E), rs4148211 (C54Y), rs4148217 (T400K), rs3806471 (5’UTR-145), and NPC1L1; positon; rs2072183 (L272L) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method.

Results: After Staest intake, the subjects with QE genotype (Q604E of ABCG5) showed a 4-fold significant decrease in LDL-C level (14.17±10.67%) compared to subjects with QQ genotype (3.50±10.65%) (p = 0.003). Moreover, the pronounced effect of Q604E polymorphism was observed in subjects after intake of Staest with meal. However, no significant difference in these markers was observed in subjects carrying other mutations.

Conclusion: Thus, it could be suggested that non-synonymous gene polymorphism resulted substitution of uncharged glutamine (Q) with negatively charged glutamic acid (E) at position 604, thereby possibly alter the function of transporter proteins. Besides, the genetic variation in these genes might be related with serum lipid profiles. Moreover, Q604E mutation of ABCG5 in each individual with meal effect could lead to particular response towards LDL-C level after Staest intervention.
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June 2016
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