Publications by authors named "Nattapong Sirintawat"

10 Publications

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Are oral lichen planus patients at high risk of hepatitis C? A case-control study.

J Stomatol Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 Jul 28. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, UKGM GmbH, Campus Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.

Objective: To assess the correlation between oral lichen planus (OLP) and viral hepatitis C (HCV).

Methods: This retrospective case-control study included a sample of OLP patients in a 3-year interval. The predictor variable was the presence of OLP (yes/no). The outcome variable was the diagnosis of HCV. Other study variables were grouped into demographic, anatomic, and clinical. Descriptive, bi- and multivariate statistics were computed with a significant level at P ≤ 0.05.

Results: The sample was composed of 237 OLP patients (38.8% females) with a mean age of 59.9 ± 17.8 years (range, 17-96), and 948 age- and gender-matched control individuals. The significant higher frequency of HCV was identified in OLP patients (frequency: 19.8% vs. 2.1%; adjusted matched odds ratio [mOR], 9.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.98 to 15.91; P < 0.0001; Pearson's Phi coefficient [r], 0.307). In the adjusted model, OLP with HCV was associated with 1) oro-cutaneous manifestations (mOR, 17.58; 95% CI, 1.92 to 161.26; P = 0.0059; Bayesian posterior probability of positive test [W], 96%), 2) any intraoral forms other than reticular/plaque-liked forms (mOR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.18; P < 0.0001; W, 52%), and 3) poor response to topical corticosteroids (mOR, 0.05; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.16; P < 0.0001; W, 88%).

Conclusions: OLP, especially oro-cutaneous disease or steroid-refractory OLP, are associated with an increased frequency of HCV. Not only HCV screening in OLP patients, but oral examination in HCV patients, are both recommended as primary preventive measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jormas.2021.07.013DOI Listing
July 2021

A German AWMF's S2e/realist synthesis and meta-narrative snapshot of craniomaxillofacial manifestations in COVID-19 patients: Rapid living update on 1 January 2021.

J Stomatol Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 Jan 30. Epub 2021 Jan 30.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, UKGM GmbH, Campus Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.

Purposes: To execute a review answering the following question: "Among novel coronavirus disease (COVID19) patients, what are craniomaxillofacial (CMF) manifestations?" based on the RAMESES and the German Association of Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF)'s S2e guidelines.

Methods: We performed a realist synthesis and meta-narrative review extracting data in English, French, German and Thai from PubMed/Medline, Embase, Biomed Central, Cochrane Library, and Thai Journals Online, until 1 January 2021. The primary outcome variable was CMF manifestations grouped into 5 categories: (1) mouth and throat, (2) nose, paranasal sinus, and skull base (3) ocular/orbital and periorbital tissue, (4) ear, and (5) craniofacial skin. Appropriate statistics was computed.

Results: Thirty-seven original articles meeting the inclusion criteria were analysed; all were in English and indexed in PubMed/Medline. Hand searches of their references yielded a total of 101 articles for the review. Most data were in low level of evidence and focused on smell and taste disturbances and non-specific orofacial lesions. Iatrogenic complications may occur in this body region. Conservative measures remained effective and were usually enough for patient care.

Conclusion: Because SARS-CoV-2 infection is new and becomes the stringent worldwide pandemic within a short time period, most of the data on CMF symptoms are of low level evidence. Apart from taste and smell dysfunctions, non-specific CMF lesions can be found and treated conservatively. Treatment complications are possible. Dentists and CMF surgeons are privileged to examine the orofacial region and work closely with colleagues in other specialities to combat this pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jormas.2021.01.012DOI Listing
January 2021

Factors associated with epiphora following orbital-sparing maxillectomy via modified Weber-Ferguson incision with lower blepharoplasty.

J Surg Oncol 2021 Apr 1;123(5):1246-1252. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Campus Marburg, UKGM GmbH, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.

Purpose: The aims of the study were to estimate the frequency of epiphora and to identify factors associated with epiphora after orbital-sparing maxillectomy via modified Weber-Ferguson incision with lower blepharoplasty (OSOSM-MWFILB).

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study enrolling a sample derived from the patient population undergoing OSM-MWFILB over a 7-year period. The predictor variables were grouped into demographic, related health status, anatomic, tumor-specific, and therapeutic categories. The primary outcome variable was the presence of postmaxillectomy epiphora (PME). Descriptive, univariate, and multivariate regression mixed-effect models were computed.

Results: The study sample was composed of 134 patients (46.3% females; 71.6% squamous cell carcinomas) with a mean age of 64.7 ± 12.2 years. There were 23 (17.2%) PME events, which were significantly associated with eight variables: male gender, poor general health (ASA III-IV), large vertical defect (Brown and Shaw's class III-IV), squamous cell carcinoma tumor type, big tumor size (T3-4), cervical lymph node metastasis (N1-2), long operating time > 3 h, and adjuvant radio(chemo)therapy in both univariate mixed regression and multivariate Cox hazards analyses. Healing of PME in irradiated patients was significantly delayed.

Conclusions: Ophthalmologic consequences in patients undergoing OSM-MWFILB require particular attention, especially in case of advanced tumors, multiple comorbidities, or long surgery with postoperative radio(chemo)therapy. This emphasizes the importance of appropriate cooperation between the surgeons and ophthalmic colleagues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.26408DOI Listing
April 2021

Do corticosteroids reduce postoperative pain following third molar intervention?

J Dent Anesth Pain Med 2020 Oct 30;20(5):281-291. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Corticosteroids have been widely used by oral surgeons for reducing swelling caused by wisdom teeth surgery. However, they have not been proven to decrease pain. This study was aimed at analyzing previous studies pertaining to corticosteroids and pain reduction following wisdom teeth surgery.

Methods: The Science Direct, PubMed, and MEDLINE databases were searched for relevant journals according to a systematic search strategy (Patient Intervention Comparison Outcome Study). Randomized controlled trials published in English from 1998 to 2017 were extracted.

Results: Twenty-seven articles were included, with a total of 36 comparative cases. Methylprednisolone and dexamethasone were the most commonly used corticosteroids. Intramuscular injections of corticosteroids were optimal for pain reduction, regardless of the time of administration.

Conclusions: Corticosteroids can be used as an adjuvant for pain reduction following wisdom teeth surgery. Methylprednisolone and dexamethasone delivered via the intramuscular route is the best method for effective pain reduction. The ideal time for administration of corticosteroids is the preoperative period.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17245/jdapm.2020.20.5.281DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7644360PMC
October 2020

Pain measurement in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

J Dent Anesth Pain Med 2017 Dec 28;17(4):253-263. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Regardless of whether it is acute or chronic, the assessment of pain should be simple and practical. Since the intensity of pain is thought to be one of the primary factors that determine its effect on a human's overall function and sense, there are many scales to assess pain. The aim of the current article was to review pain intensity scales that are commonly used in dental and oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS). Previous studies demonstrated that multidimensional scales, such as the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and Wisconsin Brief Pain Questionnaire were suitable for assessing chronic pain, while unidimensional scales, like the Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), Verbal descriptor scale, Verbal rating scale, Numerical rating Scale, Faces Pain Scale, Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale (WBS), and Full Cup Test, were used to evaluate acute pain. The WBS is widely used to assess pain in children and elderly because other scales are often difficult to understand, which could consequently lead to an overestimation of the pain intensity. In dental or OMFS research, the use of the VAS is more common because it is more reliable, valid, sensitive, and appropriate. However, some researchers use NRS to evaluate OMFS pain in adults because this scale is easier to use than VAS and yields relatively similar pain scores. This review only assessed pain scales used for post-operative OMFS or dental pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17245/jdapm.2017.17.4.253DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5766084PMC
December 2017

Lower eyelid complications associated with transconjunctival versus subciliary approaches to orbital floor fractures.

Oral Maxillofac Surg 2016 Mar 4;20(1):51-5. Epub 2015 Sep 4.

Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the frequencies of lower eyelid complications after subciliary versus transconjunctival approaches to orbital floor fractures.

Materials And Methods: The investigators implemented a retrospective cohort study and enrolled a sample composed of subjects who had orbital floor repair. The predictor variable was surgical approach, classified as subciliary or transconjunctival. The primary outcome variable was postoperative lower eyelid complications (ectropion, entropion, and eyelid retraction). Other variables were demographic, anatomic, or time to surgery. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05.

Results: The study samples were composed of 346 patients (98 [28.3%] females; 225 [65%] underwent a subciliary approach) with a mean age of 42.7 ± 21.1 years. The subciliary approach was significantly linked to the higher rates of ectropion and the lower rates of entropion at 7 days and 6 months postoperatively. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of eyelid retraction between both groups.

Conclusions: In the setting of orbital floor fractures, these results suggest that the use of the subciliary approach increases the frequency of ectropion, while the transconjunctival approach increases the frequency of entropion. The authors decline to comment on what the better surgical approach to the orbital floor fractures is. The selection should be based on an individual patient basis and surgeon's preference.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10006-015-0526-1DOI Listing
March 2016

Erratum to: Psychosocial acceptance of cleft patients: has something changed?

Oral Maxillofac Surg 2016 Mar;20(1):109

Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

The original version of the above article contained a mistake in the presentation of one of the author names. Instead of Sirintawat Nattapong, it should be presented as Nattapong Sirintawat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10006-015-0523-4DOI Listing
March 2016

Psychosocial acceptance of cleft patients: has something changed?

Oral Maxillofac Surg 2016 Mar 28;20(1):19-26. Epub 2015 Jul 28.

Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Objective: The main purpose of this study was to analyse the reactions of a panel (non-cleft adults) when observing cleft lip morphology. Although rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate is improving, there are still indications of social rejection of cleft patients by the people around them. Polarity profiles have been used since 1973 to measure social distance with regard to cleft patients. Because rehabilitation results and education of the society have improved in recent decades, we investigated whether social distance has been affected.

Setting: The setting of this study is the Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial, and Facial Plastic Surgery, University Hospital of Leipzig, Germany

Patients And Participants: Using a cross-sectional study design, we enrolled a sample of adult laypersons (n = 273). For the survey, we followed the concept of photograph presentation and questionnaire investigation reported by Sergl and Schmid (1973). We presented anonymised frontal and profile pictures of the faces of 50 cleft patients and asked the laypersons to specify social distance. Three predictor variables (layperson gender, profession and year of evaluation) were grouped.

Results: Although social distance has reduced during the last 40 years, life situations which require emotional proximity still cause some concern. Professional background and gender affect laypersons' attitudes.

Conclusion: Although rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate is much better than 40 years ago, social distance remains a problem in society. It is necessary to improve both results of rehabilitation of cleft patients and social acceptance by the people around them.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10006-015-0518-1DOI Listing
March 2016

Factors affecting scientific productivity of German oral-maxillofacial surgery training centers: a retrospective cohort study.

Oral Maxillofac Surg 2015 Sep 25;19(3):259-65. Epub 2015 Feb 25.

Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany,

Purpose: To identify factors associated with scientific productivity (SP) of German oral-maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) training centers.

Materials And Methods: This retrospective cohort study was composed of a set of data from German OMFS training centers. A total of eight predictor variables were grouped into demographic, structural, and personal categories. The outcome variables were average publications in 2013 per senior staff, and percentage of OMFS trainees with >1 publications. Descriptive and univariate statistics were computed using P < 0.05.

Results: The sample included outputs from 62 OMFS departments (34 [54.8 %] university-based; 46 [74.2 %] in large cities). Average publications were 2.4 ± 3 per senior staff (range, 0-27), and 160 trainees (31.7 %) published >1 papers. The number of publications and productive trainees was not linked to department name and number of female senior staffs, but publication count was significantly increased when the hospital was in a metropolis (P = 0.018) or university-based (P < 0.0001), the OMFS' chairperson and >3 staffs within the department had a postdoctoral degree (German "Habilitation") (P = 0.013 and <0.0001), and the chairperson had h-index >10 or the first/last authorship in 2013 (P < 0.0001). Female senior surgeons were less scientifically productive than the male ones (P = 0.01).

Conclusion: SP of German OMFS training centers is greatly different across the country and influenced by city size, university base, educational backgrounds, and research activities of chairpersons and senior staffs. This helps students, trainees, and young surgeons to reach the career choice that is personally appropriate. The involved organizations may need to encourage research output of less productive surgeons/centers. Increasing postdoctoral-qualified staffs will increase SP of the department.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10006-015-0489-2DOI Listing
September 2015

Grand rounds: Eyelid swelling after nose blowing.

Am J Otolaryngol 2014 May-Jun;35(3):456-9. Epub 2014 Feb 3.

Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2014.01.007DOI Listing
December 2014
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