Publications by authors named "Natsuki Yamakami"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of ankle joint fixation on tibialis anterior muscle activity during split-belt treadmill walking in healthy subjects: A pilot study.

Turk J Phys Med Rehabil 2021 Mar 4;67(1):11-16. Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Department of Rehabilitation, Fujita Health University Bantane Hospital, Nagoya, Japan.

Objectives: This study aims to examine the characteristics of muscle activity change of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in healthy adults while they walked on a split-belt treadmill with one fixed ankle.

Patients And Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted between November 2017 and July 2018. Fourteen healthy male individuals (mean age 31.4 years; range, 23 to 50 years) were divided into two groups: right ankle joint fixed by ankle-foot orthosis (fixation group) and no orthosis (control group). Both groups were asked to walk on a treadmill with the same belt speed. After familiarizing with walking on both belts at 5.0 km/h, they walked for 6 min with the right belt slower (2.5 km/h) and the left faster (5.0 km/h). For analysis, the 6 min were divided equally among three time periods. The TA muscle activity was calculated at first and last time periods. We compared muscle activities in time periods (early and late phase) and in groups (fixation and control) using two-way mixed analysis of variance.

Results: The TA muscle activity decreased in the late phase regardless of ankle joint fixation, and also decreased in the fixation group regardless of the time periods. There was an interaction between these factors.

Conclusion: These data show that changes in the TA muscle activity were smaller in the fixation group, suggesting that the ankle joint fixation reduces the adaptation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5606/tftrd.2021.4980DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8088797PMC
March 2021

Merging and Fractionation of Muscle Synergy Indicate the Recovery Process in Patients with Hemiplegia: The First Study of Patients after Subacute Stroke.

Neural Plast 2016 19;2016:5282957. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Loss of motor coordination is one of the main problems for patients after stroke. Muscle synergy is widely accepted as an indicator of motor coordination. Recently, the characteristics of muscle synergy were quantitatively evaluated using nonnegative matrix factorization (NNMF) with surface electromyography. Previous studies have identified that the number and structure of synergies were associated with motor function in patients after stroke. However, most of these studies had a cross-sectional design, and the changes in muscle synergy during recovery process are not clear. In present study, two consecutive measurements were conducted for subacute patients after stroke and the change of number and structure of muscle synergies during gait were determined using NNMF. Results showed that functional change did not rely on number of synergies in patients after subacute stroke. However, the extent of merging of the synergies was negatively associated with an increase in muscle strength and the range of angle at ankle joint. Our results suggest that the neural changes represented by NNMF were related to the longitudinal change of function and gait pattern and that the merging of synergy is an important marker in patients after subacute stroke.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5282957DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5206781PMC
August 2017

Ankle muscle coactivation and its relationship with ankle joint kinematics and kinetics during gait in hemiplegic patients after stroke.

Somatosens Mot Res 2016 06 18;33(2):79-85. Epub 2016 May 18.

a Department of Physical Therapy , Kyoto University , Kyoto , Japan ;

Introduction: Increased ankle muscle coactivation during gait is a compensation strategy for enhancing postural stability in patients after stroke. However, no previous studies have demonstrated that increased ankle muscle coactivation influenced ankle joint movements during gait in patients after stroke.

Purpose: To investigate the relationship between ankle muscle coactivation and ankle joint movements in hemiplegic patients after stroke.

Methods: Seventeen patients after stroke participated. The coactivation index (CoI) at the ankle joint was calculated separately for the first and second double support (DS1 and DS2, respectively) and single support (SS) phases on the paretic and non-paretic sides during gait using surface electromyography. Simultaneously, three-dimensional motion analysis was performed to measure the peak values of the ankle joint angle, moment, and power in the sagittal plane. Ground reaction forces (GRFs) of the anterior and posterior components and centers of pressure (COPs) trajectory ranges and velocities were also measured.

Results: The CoI during the SS phase on the paretic side was negatively related to ankle dorsiflexion angle, ankle plantarflexion moment, ankle joint power generation, and COP velocity on the paretic side. Furthermore, the CoI during the DS2 phase on both sides was negatively related to anterior GRF amplitude on each side.

Conclusion: Increased ankle muscle coactivation is related to decreased ankle joint movement during the SS phase on the paretic side to enhance joint stiffness and compensate for stance limb instability, which may be useful for patients who have paretic instability during the stance phase after stroke.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08990220.2016.1178636DOI Listing
June 2016

Clinical factors associated with ankle muscle coactivation during gait in adults after stroke.

NeuroRehabilitation 2016 Apr;38(4):351-7

Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Background: Increased ankle muscle coactivation during gait represents an adaptation strategy to compensate for postural instability in adults after stroke. Although increased ankle muscle coactivation is correlated with gait disorders in adults after stroke, it remains unclear which physical impairments are the most predictive clinical factors explaining ankle muscle coactivation during gait.

Objective: To investigate these physical impairments in adults after stroke using stepwise multiple regression analyses.

Methods: The magnitude of ankle muscle coactivation during gait was quantified with a coactivation index (CoI) for the first and second double support (DS2), and single support (SS) phases in 44 community-dwelling adults after stroke. Paretic motor function, sensory function, spasticity, ankle muscle strength, and balance ability were evaluated.

Results: The regression analysis revealed that the balance ability and paretic ankle plantarflexor muscle strength were significant factors determining the CoI during the SS phase on the paretic side. For the CoI during the DS2 phase on the paretic side, only the balance ability was selected as a significant factor.

Conclusion: Adults with impaired balance ability and paretic ankle muscle weakness after stroke used a compensation strategy of increased ankle muscle coactivation on the paretic side to enhance postural stability during gait.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-161326DOI Listing
April 2016

Ankle muscle coactivation during gait is decreased immediately after anterior weight shift practice in adults after stroke.

Gait Posture 2016 Mar 12;45:35-40. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Increased ankle muscle coactivation during gait has frequently been observed as an adaptation strategy to compensate for postural instability in adults after stroke. However, it remains unclear whether the muscle coactivation pattern increases or decreases after balance training. The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of balance practice on ankle muscle coactivation during gait in adults after stroke. Standing balance practice performed to shift as much weight anteriorly as possible in 24 participants after stroke. The forward movement distance of the center of pressure (COP) during anterior weight shifting, gait speed, and ankle muscle activities during 10-m walking tests were measured immediately before and after balance practice. Forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting and gait speed significantly increased after balance practice. On the paretic side, tibialis anterior muscle activity significantly decreased during the single support and second double support phases, and the coactivation index at the ankle joint during the first double support and single support phases significantly decreased after balance practice. However, there were no significant relationships between the changes in gait speed, forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting, and ankle muscle coactivation during the stance phase. These results suggested that ankle muscle coactivation on the paretic side during the stance phase was decreased immediately after short-term anterior weight shift practice, which was not associated with improved gait speed or forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting in adults after stroke.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.01.006DOI Listing
March 2016

Reduction in energy expenditure during walking using an automated stride assistance device in healthy young adults.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2014 Nov 24;95(11):2128-33. Epub 2014 Jul 24.

Fujita Health University Hospital, Toyoake, Japan.

Objective: To investigate the effects of an automated stride assistance device that assists hip joint flexion and extension movement in energy expenditure during walking in healthy young adults using an expired gas method.

Design: Prospective, single-group design to compare the differences of energy expenditure between 2 assistive conditions.

Setting: Laboratory.

Participants: Healthy volunteers (N=10) aged 21 to 32 years.

Interventions: Not applicable.

Main Outcome Measures: Oxygen consumption per unit time (V˙o2) cost (ml·kg(-1)·m(-1)), and heart rate (beats/min) were measured in 2 assistive conditions (with 3-Nm hip motion assistance and without assistance) and at 2 walking speeds (comfortable walking speed [CWS] and maximum walking speed [MWS]).

Results: There were no significant differences in walking speed between the with- and without-assistance conditions at either the CWS or MWS. The V˙o2 cost and heart rate were significantly reduced in the with-assistance condition compared with the without-assistance condition, at both the CWS and MWS. The reduction in the V˙o2 cost during the with-assistance condition, relative to the without-assistance condition, was 7.06% at the CWS and 10.52% at the MWS.

Conclusions: The automated stride assistance device is useful for reducing energy expenditure during walking in healthy adults. Further studies are warranted to investigate if this device provides substantial help to individuals with impaired mobility as a result of strength deficits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2014.07.008DOI Listing
November 2014