Publications by authors named "Nathan Klose"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A multicenter laboratory assessment of a new automated chemiluminescent assay for ADAMTS13 activity.

J Thromb Haemost 2021 02 21;19(2):417-428. Epub 2020 Nov 21.

Department of Haematology, Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research (ICPMR), NSW Health Pathology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

Background: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare but potentially fatal disorder caused by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13) deficiency. Prompt identification/exclusion of TTP can thus be facilitated by rapid ADAMTS13 testing. The most commonly utilized (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]-based) assay takes several hours to perform and so does not generally permit rapid testing.

Objectives: To evaluate the utility of a new automated test for ADAMTS13 activity, the HemosIL AcuStar ADAMTS13 Activity assay, based on chemiluminescence and able to be performed on an ACL AcuStar instrument within 33 minutes.

Patients/methods: This multicenter (n = 8) assessment included testing of more than 700 test samples, with similar numbers of prospective (n = 348) and retrospective (n = 385) samples. The main comparator was the Technozym ADAMTS13 Activity ELISA. We also assessed comparative performance for detection of ADAMTS13 inhibitors using a Bethesda assay.

Results: Overall, the chemiluminescent assay yielded similar results to the comparator ELISA, albeit with slight negative bias. ADAMTS13 inhibitor detection was also comparable, albeit with slight positive bias with the AcuStar assay. Assay precision was similar with both assays, and we also verified assay normal reference ranges.

Conclusions: The HemosIL AcuStar ADAMTS13 Activity assay provided results rapidly, which were largely comparable with the Technozym ADAMTS13 Activity ELISA assay, albeit lower on average. Conversely, inhibitor levels tended to be identified at a higher level on average. Thus, the HemosIL AcuStar ADAMTS13 Activity assay provides a fast and accurate means to quantitate plasma levels of ADAMTS13 for TTP/ADAMTS13 identification/exclusion, and potentially also for other applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.15157DOI Listing
February 2021

A multicentre assessment of contemporary laboratory assays for heparin induced thrombocytopenia.

Pathology 2021 Feb 5;53(2):247-256. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

NSW Health Pathology, NSW, Australia; Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia.

Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of heparin therapy. In some patients, HIT causes platelet activation and thrombosis (sometimes abbreviated HITT), which leads to adverse clinical sequalae ('pathological HIT'). The likelihood of HIT is initially assessed clinically, typically using a scoring system, of which the 4T score is that most utilised. Subsequent laboratory testing to confirm or exclude HIT facilitates exclusion or diagnosis and management. The current investigation comprises a multicentre (n=9) assessment of contemporary laboratory testing for HIT, as performed over the past 1-3 years in each site and comprising testing of over 1200 samples. The primary laboratory test used by study participants (n=8) comprised a chemiluminescence procedure (HIT-IgG) performed on an AcuStar instrument. Additional immunological testing performed by study sites included lateral flow (STiC, Stago), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Asserachrom (HPIA IgG), PaGIA (BioRad), plus functional assays, primarily serotonin release assay (SRA) or platelet aggregation methods. The chemiluminescence procedure yielded a highly sensitive screening method for identifying functional HIT, given high area under the curve (AUC, generally ≥0.9) in a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis against SRA as gold standard. ELISA testing resulted in lower ROC AUC scores (<0.8) and higher levels of false positives. Although there is clear association with the likelihood of HIT, the 4T score had less utility than literature suggests, and was comparable to a previous study reported by some of the authors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pathol.2020.07.012DOI Listing
February 2021

Rapid Molecular Profiling of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Using Targeted Exon Resequencing of 86 Genes Involved in JAK-STAT Signaling and Epigenetic Regulation.

J Mol Diagn 2016 09 19;18(5):707-718. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

Mater Research Institute, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia; Department of Pathology, Mater Health Services, Mater Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Department of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; ICON Cancer Care, Milton, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address:

Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a heterogeneous group of blood disorders characterized by excess production of mature blood cells and an increased risk of late transformation to acute myeloid leukemia or primary myelofibrosis. Approximately 15% of MPN cases do not carry mutations in JAK2, CALR, or MPL and are thus often referred to as triple-negative cases. These are caused by a diverse set of rare mutations in cytokine receptors, JAK-STAT signaling pathway components, or epigenetic modifiers. In addition, some cases diagnosed as MPN are reactive rather than clonal disorders, so a negative result from a genetic screen can be informative. To obtain a comprehensive rapid molecular diagnosis for most MPNs, we developed an assay to detect genetic mutations (single nucleotide variants and/or small insertions/deletions) in 86 genes using targeted exon resequencing (AmpliSeq) and a bench-top semiconductor machine (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine). Our assay reliably detects well characterized mutations in JAK2, CALR, and MPL, but also rarer mutations in ASXL1, TET2, SH2B3, and other genes. Some of these mutations are novel. We find multiple mutations in advanced cases, suggesting co-operation between Janus kinase-STAT pathway mutations and epigenetic mutations in disease progression. This assay can be used to follow molecular progression, clonal heterogeneity, and drug resistance in MPNs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmoldx.2016.05.006DOI Listing
September 2016