Publications by authors named "Nathalie V Velarde"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

EGG-4 and EGG-5 Link Events of the Oocyte-to-Embryo Transition with Meiotic Progression in C. elegans.

Curr Biol 2009 Nov;19(20):1752-7

Waksman Institute and Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.

The molecular underpinnings of the oocyte-to-embryo transition are poorly understood. Here we show that two protein tyrosine phosphatase-like (PTPL) family proteins, EGG-4 and EGG-5, are required for key events of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in Caenorhabditis elegans. The predicted EGG-4 and EGG-5 amino acid sequences are 99% identical and their functions are redundant. In embryos lacking EGG-4 and EGG-5, we observe defects in meiosis, polar body formation, the block to polyspermy, F-actin dynamics, and eggshell deposition. During oogenesis, EGG-4 and EGG-5 assemble at the oocyte cortex with the previously identified regulators or effectors of the oocyte-to-embryo transition EGG-3, CHS-1, and MBK-2 [1, 2]. All of these molecules share a complex interdependence with regards to their dynamics and subcellular localization. Shortly after fertilization, EGG-4 and EGG-5 are required to properly coordinate a redistribution of CHS-1 and EGG-3 away from the cortex during meiotic anaphase I. Therefore, EGG-4 and EGG-5 are not only required for critical events of the oocyte-to-embryo transition but also link the dynamics of the regulatory machinery with the advancing cell cycle.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2009.09.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2783797PMC
November 2009

EGG-3 regulates cell-surface and cortex rearrangements during egg activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Curr Biol 2007 Sep;17(18):1555-60

Waksman Institute, Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

Fertilization triggers egg activation and converts the egg into a developing embryo. The events of this egg-to-embryo transition typically include the resumption of meiosis, the reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and the remodeling of the oocyte surface. The factors that regulate sperm-dependent egg-activation events are not well understood. Caenorhabditis elegans EGG-3, a member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like (PTPL) family, is essential for regulating cell-surface and cortex rearrangements during egg activation in response to sperm entry. Although fertilization occurred normally in egg-3 mutants, the polarized dispersal of F-actin is altered, a chitin eggshell is not formed, and no polar bodies are produced. EGG-3 is associated with the oocyte plasma membrane in a pattern that is similar to CHS-1 and MBK-2. CHS-1 is required for eggshell deposition, whereas MBK-2 is required for the degradation of maternal proteins during the egg-to-embryo transition. The localization of CHS-1 and EGG-3 are interdependent and both genes were required for the proper localization of MBK-2 in oocytes. Therefore, EGG-3 plays a central role in egg activation by influencing polarized F-actin dynamics and the localization or activity of molecules that are directly involved in executing the egg-to-embryo transition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2007.08.011DOI Listing
September 2007

Two phases of astral microtubule activity during cytokinesis in C. elegans embryos.

Dev Cell 2006 Apr;10(4):509-20

Laboratory for Developmental Genomics, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, 2-2-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Kobe, 650-0047, Japan.

Microtubules of the mitotic spindle are believed to provide positional cues for the assembly of the actin-based contractile ring and the formation of the subsequent cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. In Caenorhabditis elegans, astral microtubules have been thought to inhibit cortical contraction outside the cleavage furrow. Here, we demonstrate by live imaging and RNA interference (RNAi) that astral microtubules play two distinct roles in initiating cleavage furrow formation. In early anaphase, microtubules are required for contractile ring assembly; in late anaphase, microtubules show different cortical behavior and seem to suppress cortical contraction at the poles, as suggested in previous studies. These two distinct phases of microtubule behavior depend on distinct regulatory pathways, one involving the gamma-tubulin complex and the other requiring aurora-A kinase. We propose that temporal and spatial regulation of two distinct phases of astral microtubule behavior is crucial in specifying the position and timing of furrowing.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2006.03.001DOI Listing
April 2006
-->