Publications by authors named "Nathalie Ronce"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Blepharophimosis, short humeri, developmental delay and hirschsprung disease: expanding the phenotypic spectrum of MED12 mutations.

Am J Med Genet A 2014 Jul 8;164A(7):1821-5. Epub 2014 Apr 8.

Service de Génétique Médicale, CHU de Nantes, Nantes, France; INSERM, UMR-S 957, Nantes, France.

We report on two male sibs, a fetus and a newborn, with short humeri and dysmorphic facial features including blepharophimosis. The newborn also had Hirschsprung disease. Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome and the Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson type of Ohdo syndrome were suspected but direct sequencing of KBP and KAT6B failed to identify a mutation. Finally, direct sequencing of MED12, the gene mutated in Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome, Lujan-Fryns syndrome and X-linked Ohdo syndrome identified in the two sibs the missense mutation c.3443G>A (p.Arg1148His) inherited from the mother. This report further expands the phenotypic spectrum of MED12 mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.36539DOI Listing
July 2014

Mutation frequencies of X-linked mental retardation genes in families from the EuroMRX consortium.

Hum Mutat 2007 Feb;28(2):207-8

Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The EuroMRX family cohort consists of about 400 families with non-syndromic and 200 families with syndromic X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). After exclusion of Fragile X (Fra X) syndrome, probands from these families were tested for mutations in the coding sequence of 90 known and candidate XLMR genes. In total, 73 causative mutations were identified in 21 genes. For 42% of the families with obligate female carriers, the mental retardation phenotype could be explained by a mutation. There was no difference between families with (lod score >2) or without (lod score <2) significant linkage to the X chromosome. For families with two to five affected brothers (brother pair=BP families) only 17% of the MR could be explained. This is significantly lower (P=0.0067) than in families with obligate carrier females and indicates that the MR in about 40% (17/42) of the BP families is due to a single genetic defect on the X chromosome. The mutation frequency of XLMR genes in BP families is lower than can be expected on basis of the male to female ratio of patients with MR or observed recurrence risks. This might be explained by genetic risk factors on the X chromosome, resulting in a more complex etiology in a substantial portion of XLMR patients. The EuroMRX effort is the first attempt to unravel the molecular basis of cognitive dysfunction by large-scale approaches in a large patient cohort. Our results show that it is now possible to identify 42% of the genetic defects in non-syndromic and syndromic XLMR families with obligate female carriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.9482DOI Listing
February 2007

X-linked mental retardation and autism are associated with a mutation in the NLGN4 gene, a member of the neuroligin family.

Am J Hum Genet 2004 Mar 12;74(3):552-7. Epub 2004 Feb 12.

INSERM U619-Génétique de l'Autisme et de la Déficience Mentale, CHU Bretonneau, Tours, France.

A large French family including members affected by nonspecific X-linked mental retardation, with or without autism or pervasive developmental disorder in affected male patients, has been found to have a 2-base-pair deletion in the Neuroligin 4 gene (NLGN4) located at Xp22.33. This mutation leads to a premature stop codon in the middle of the sequence of the normal protein and is thought to suppress the transmembrane domain and sequences important for the dimerization of neuroligins that are required for proper cell-cell interaction through binding to beta-neurexins. As the neuroligins are mostly enriched at excitatory synapses, these results suggest that a defect in synaptogenesis may lead to deficits in cognitive development and communication processes. The fact that the deletion was present in both autistic and nonautistic mentally retarded males suggests that the NLGN4 gene is not only involved in autism, as previously described, but also in mental retardation, indicating that some types of autistic disorder and mental retardation may have common genetic origins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/382137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1182268PMC
March 2004

Specific clinical and brain MRI features in mentally retarded patients with mutations in the Oligophrenin-1 gene.

Am J Med Genet A 2004 Feb;124A(4):364-71

Service de Pédiatrie, HCL, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69395 Pierre-Bénite, France.

Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN-1) gene disruption is known as responsible for so called "non-specific" X-linked mental retardation (MR) Billuart et al. [1998: Nature 392:923-926]. In order to search for a possible specific clinical and radiological profile for mutation in the OPHN-1 gene, clinical and 3D brain MRI studies were performed in the two families with a known mutation in OPHN-1 reported so far: a 19-year-old female with an X;12 balanced translocation encompassing OPHN-1, and four affected males of family MRX60 sharing a frameshift mutation in OPHN-1. Clinical data shared by affected individuals were neonatal hypotonia with motor delay but no obvious ataxia, marked strabismus, early onset complex partial seizures, and moderate to severe MR. Brain MRIs performed in three individuals exhibited a specific vermian dysgenesis including an incomplete sulcation of anterior and posterior vermis with the most prominent defect in lobules VI and VII. In addition, a non-specific cerebral cortico-subcortical atrophy was also observed. These clinical and radiological features suggest a distinct clinico-radiological syndrome. These preliminary data need to be confirmed in other families and will be helpful for further targeted mutation screening of the OPHN-1 gene in male patients with similar clinico-radiological features. In addition, OPHN-1 inactivation should be considered as a relevant model of developmental vermis disorganization, leading to a better understanding of the possible role of the cerebellum in MR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.20422DOI Listing
February 2004

Skewed X chromosome inactivation in carriers is not a constant finding in FG syndrome.

Eur J Hum Genet 2003 Apr;11(4):352-6

Service de Génétique et INSERM U316, Hôpital Bretonneau, 2 boulevard Tonnellé, 37044 Tours Cedex 1, France.

Genetic heterogeneity has been demonstrated in FG syndrome. We report a systematic study of the X-inactivation profile of obligate carriers and other females in FG pedigrees. It was expected that the characterization of particular X-inactivation profiles in carriers in some families might be related to the same mutated gene. Analysis of the X-inactivation profiles in carriers demonstrated different profiles but no correlation was found with the results of the linkage study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejhg.5200959DOI Listing
April 2003

Transcription factor SOX3 is involved in X-linked mental retardation with growth hormone deficiency.

Am J Hum Genet 2002 Dec 8;71(6):1450-5. Epub 2002 Nov 8.

Service de GénétiquehyphenINSERM U316, CHU Bretonneau, Tours, France.

Physical mapping of the breakpoints of a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome (46,X,inv[X][p21q27]) in a female patient with mild mental retardation revealed localization of the Xp breakpoint in the IL1RAPL gene at Xp21.3 and the Xq breakpoint near the SOX3 gene (SRY [sex determining region Y]-box 3) (GenBank accession number NM_005634) at Xq26.3. Because carrier females with microdeletion in the IL1RAPL gene do not present any abnormal phenotype, we focused on the Xq breakpoint. However, we were unable to confirm the involvement of SOX3 in the mental retardation in this female patient. To validate SOX3 as an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) gene, we performed mutation analyses in families with XLMR whose causative gene mapped to Xq26-q27. We show here that the SOX3 gene is involved in a large family in which affected individuals have mental retardation and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation results in an in-frame duplication of 33 bp encoding for 11 alanines in a polyalanine tract of the SOX3 gene. The expression pattern during neural and pituitary development suggests that dysfunction of the SOX3 protein caused by the polyalanine expansion might disturb transcription pathways and the regulation of genes involved in cellular processes and functions required for cognitive and pituitary development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/344661DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC420004PMC
December 2002

TM4SF2 gene involvement reconsidered in an XLMR family after neuropsychological assessment.

Am J Med Genet 2002 Nov;112(4):400-4

Service de Génétique, INSERM 4316 CHU Bretonneau, Tours, France.

The TM4SF2 gene (localized at Xp11.4 between the loci DXS564 and DXS556) has been found to be mutated in one MRX family. In order to define the corresponding behavioral phenotype, global IQ and specific cognitive skills were assessed in seven males and three females of this family, independent of subject status. Mental retardation (MR) was mild in three patients and moderate in three others. Despite the broad variability of severity of MR, a cognitive profile specific to the MR in this family was documented. It was characterized by language disorder that was more marked in the articulatory component and spatial/verbal short-term memory dissociation with larger mnemonic span for spatial than for verbal cues. Linkage analysis was then performed on the basis of the cognitively determined status. Recombinations were observed with the loci DXS556 at Xp11.4 and DXS441 at Xq13.2 (maximum LOD score = 2.23 at theta = 0 for ALAS2). This localization region does not include the TM4SF2 gene that has been found mutated in both patients with MR and in one non-MR male subject of this family. The present results suggest two main hypotheses. First, TM4SF2 gene mutation could be involved in MR in this family, therefore representing accentuated intra familial phenotypic variability. Second, the structural particularity detected in the TM4SF2 gene might reflect a rare polymorphism rather than a pathogenic mutation, with the gene responsible for MR in this family being therefore more likely to be searched for in the pericentromeric region of the X chromosome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.10564DOI Listing
November 2002

Refinement of the NHS locus on chromosome Xp22.13 and analysis of five candidate genes.

Eur J Hum Genet 2002 Sep;10(9):516-20

Service de Génétique, Hôpital Bretonneau, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire, Tours, France.

Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked condition characterised by congenital cataracts, dental abnormalities, dysmorphic features, and mental retardation in some cases. Previous studies have mapped the disease gene to a 2 cM interval on Xp22.2 between DXS43 and DXS999. We report additional linkage data resulting from the analysis of eleven independent NHS families. A maximum lod score of 9.94 (theta=0.00) was obtained at the RS1 locus and a recombination with locus DXS1195 on the telomeric side was observed in two families, thus refining the location of the gene to an interval of around 1 Mb on Xp22.13. Direct sequencing or SSCP analysis of the coding exons of five genes (SCML1, SCML2, STK9, RS1 and PPEF1), considered as candidate genes on the basis of their location in the critical interval, failed to detect any mutation in 12 unrelated NHS patients, thus making it highly unlikely that these genes are implicated in NHS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejhg.5200846DOI Listing
September 2002
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