Publications by authors named "Nathalie Caruso"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

HOXB8 Counteracts MAPK/ERK Oncogenic Signaling in a Chicken Embryo Model of Neoplasia.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Aug 18;22(16). Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Aix Marseille Université (AMU), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Institut de Biologie du Développement de Marseille (IBDM-UMR 7288), 13288 Marseille, France.

HOX transcription factors are members of an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins required for the establishment of the anteroposterior body axis during bilaterian development. Although they are often deregulated in cancers, the molecular mechanisms by which they act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes are only partially understood. Since the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway is deregulated in most cancers, we aimed at apprehending if and how the Hox proteins interact with ERK oncogenicity. Using an in vivo neoplasia model in the chicken embryo consisting in the overactivation of the ERK1/2 kinases in the trunk neural tube, we analyzed the consequences of the HOXB8 gain of function at the morphological and transcriptional levels. We found that HOXB8 acts as a tumor suppressor, counteracting ERK-induced neoplasia. The HOXB8 tumor suppressor function relies on a large reversion of the oncogenic transcriptome induced by ERK. In addition to showing that the HOXB8 protein controls the transcriptional responsiveness to ERK oncogenic signaling, our study identified new downstream targets of ERK oncogenic activation in an in vivo context that could provide clues for therapeutic strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22168911DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8396257PMC
August 2021

HoxB genes regulate neuronal delamination in the trunk neural tube by controlling the expression of .

Development 2021 02 18;148(4). Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Aix Marseille University, CNRS, IBDM, 13288 Marseille, France

Differential Hox gene expression is central for specification of axial neuronal diversity in the spinal cord. Here, we uncover an additional function of Hox proteins in the developing spinal cord, restricted to B cluster Hox genes. We found that members of the HoxB cluster are expressed in the trunk neural tube of chicken embryo earlier than Hox from the other clusters, with poor antero-posterior axial specificity and with overlapping expression in the intermediate zone (IZ). Gain-of-function experiments of HoxB4, HoxB8 and HoxB9, respectively, representative of anterior, central and posterior HoxB genes, resulted in ectopic progenitor cells in the mantle zone. The search for HoxB8 downstream targets in the early neural tube identified the leucine zipper tumor suppressor 1 gene (), the expression of which is also activated by HoxB4 and HoxB9. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments showed that Lzts1, which is expressed endogenously in the IZ, controls neuronal delamination. These data collectively indicate that HoxB genes have a generic function in the developing spinal cord, controlling the expression of and neuronal delamination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.195404DOI Listing
February 2021

Human ZKSCAN3 and Drosophila M1BP are functionally homologous transcription factors in autophagy regulation.

Sci Rep 2020 06 15;10(1):9653. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, IBDM, UMR 7288, Marseille, 13288, Cedex 09, France.

Autophagy is an essential cellular process that maintains homeostasis by recycling damaged organelles and nutrients during development and cellular stress. ZKSCAN3 is the sole identified master transcriptional repressor of autophagy in human cell lines. How ZKSCAN3 achieves autophagy repression at the mechanistic or organismal level however still remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, Zkscan3 knockout mice display no discernable autophagy-related phenotypes, suggesting that there may be substantial differences in the regulation of autophagy between normal tissues and tumor cell lines. Here, we demonstrate that vertebrate ZKSCAN3 and Drosophila M1BP are functionally homologous transcription factors in autophagy repression. Expression of ZKSCAN3 in Drosophila prevents premature autophagy onset due to loss of M1BP function and conversely, M1BP expression in human cells can prevent starvation-induced autophagy due to loss of nuclear ZKSCAN3 function. In Drosophila ZKSCAN3 binds genome-wide to sequences targeted by M1BP and transcriptionally regulates the majority of M1BP-controlled genes, demonstrating the evolutionary conservation of the transcriptional repression of autophagy. This study thus  allows the potential for transitioning the mechanisms, gene targets and plethora metabolic processes controlled by M1BP onto ZKSCAN3 and opens up Drosophila as a tool in studying the function of ZKSCAN3 in autophagy and tumourigenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-66377-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7296029PMC
June 2020

Correlation between low FAT1 expression and early affected muscle in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

Ann Neurol 2015 Sep 3;78(3):387-400. Epub 2015 Jul 3.

Center of Research in Myology, Pierre and Marie Curie University, Sorbonne Universities, Paris.

Objective: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to either contraction of D4Z4 repeats on chromosome 4 or to mutations in the SMCHD1 gene, both of which result in the aberrant expression of the transcription factor DUX4. However, it is still difficult to correlate these genotypes with the phenotypes observed in patients. Because we have recently shown that mice with disrupted Fat1 functions exhibit FSHD-like phenotypes, we have investigated the expression of the human FAT1 gene in FSHD.

Methods: We first analyzed FAT1 expression in FSHD adult muscles and determined whether FAT1 expression was driven by DUX4. We next determined FAT1 expression levels in 64 muscles isolated from 16 control fetuses. These data were further complemented with analysis of Fat1 expression in developing mouse embryos.

Results: We demonstrated that FAT1 expression is independent of DUX4. Moreover, we observed that (1) in control fetal human biopsies or in developing mouse embryos, FAT1 is expressed at lower levels in muscles that are affected at early stages of FSHD progression than in muscles that are affected later or are nonaffected; and (2) in adult muscle biopsies, FAT1 expression is lower in FSHD muscles compared to control muscles.

Interpretation: We propose a revised model for FSHD in which FAT1 levels might play a role in determining which muscles will exhibit early and late disease onset, whereas DUX4 may worsen the muscle phenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.24446DOI Listing
September 2015

Plasticity versus specificity in RTK signalling modalities for distinct biological outcomes in motor neurons.

BMC Biol 2014 Aug 14;12:56. Epub 2014 Aug 14.

Background: Multiple growth factors are known to control several aspects of neuronal biology, consecutively acting as morphogens to diversify neuronal fates, as guidance cues for axonal growth, and as modulators of survival or death to regulate neuronal numbers. The multiplicity of neuronal types is permitted by the combinatorial usage of growth factor receptors, each of which is expressed in distinct and overlapping subsets of neurons, and by the multitasking role of growth factor receptors, which recruit multiple signalling cascades differentially required for distinct biological outcomes. We have explored signalling robustness in cells where a given receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) elicits qualitatively distinct outcomes. As the HGF/Met system regulates several biological responses in motor neurons (MN) during neuromuscular development, we have investigated the signalling modalities through which the HGF/Met system impacts on MN biology, and the degree of robustness of each of these functions, when challenged with substitutions of signalling pathways.

Results: Using a set of mouse lines carrying signalling mutations that change the Met phosphotyrosine binding preferences, we have asked whether distinct functions of Met in several MN subtypes require specific signalling pathways, and to which extent signalling plasticity allows a pleiotropic system to exert distinct developmental outcomes. The differential ability of signalling mutants to promote muscle migration versus axonal growth allowed us to uncouple an indirect effect of HGF/Met signalling on nerve growth through the regulation of muscle size from a direct regulation of motor growth via the PI3 kinase (PI3K), but not Src kinase, pathway. Furthermore, we found that HGF/Met-triggered expansion of Pea3 expression domain in the spinal cord can be accomplished through several alternative signalling cascades, differentially sensitive to the Pea3 dosage. Finally, we show that the regulation of MN survival by HGF/Met can equally be achieved in vitro and in vivo by alternative signalling cascades involving either PI3K-Akt or Src and Mek pathways.

Conclusions: Our findings distinguish MN survival and fate specification, as RTK-triggered responses allowing substitutions of the downstream signalling routes, from nerve growth patterning, which depends on a selective, non-substitutable pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12915-014-0056-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4169644PMC
August 2014

Deregulation of the protocadherin gene FAT1 alters muscle shapes: implications for the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

PLoS Genet 2013 Jun 13;9(6):e1003550. Epub 2013 Jun 13.

Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IBDML UMR 7288, Parc Scientifique de Luminy, Case 907, Marseille, France.

Generation of skeletal muscles with forms adapted to their function is essential for normal movement. Muscle shape is patterned by the coordinated polarity of collectively migrating myoblasts. Constitutive inactivation of the protocadherin gene Fat1 uncoupled individual myoblast polarity within chains, altering the shape of selective groups of muscles in the shoulder and face. These shape abnormalities were followed by early onset regionalised muscle defects in adult Fat1-deficient mice. Tissue-specific ablation of Fat1 driven by Pax3-cre reproduced muscle shape defects in limb but not face muscles, indicating a cell-autonomous contribution of Fat1 in migrating muscle precursors. Strikingly, the topography of muscle abnormalities caused by Fat1 loss-of-function resembles that of human patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). FAT1 lies near the critical locus involved in causing FSHD, and Fat1 mutant mice also show retinal vasculopathy, mimicking another symptom of FSHD, and showed abnormal inner ear patterning, predictive of deafness, reminiscent of another burden of FSHD. Muscle-specific reduction of FAT1 expression and promoter silencing was observed in foetal FSHD1 cases. CGH array-based studies identified deletion polymorphisms within a putative regulatory enhancer of FAT1, predictive of tissue-specific depletion of FAT1 expression, which preferentially segregate with FSHD. Our study identifies FAT1 as a critical determinant of muscle form, misregulation of which associates with FSHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003550DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3681729PMC
June 2013

Pool-specific regulation of motor neuron survival by neurotrophic support.

J Neurosci 2011 Aug;31(31):11144-58

Developmental Biology Institute of Marseille-Luminy (IBDML), UMR 6216, CNRS-Inserm-Université de la Méditerranée, Campus de Luminy-Case 907, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, France.

The precise control of motor neuron (MN) death and survival following initial innervation of skeletal muscle targets is a key step in sculpting a functional motor system, but how this is regulated at the level of individual motor pools remains unclear. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor Met play key developmental roles in both muscle and MNs. We generated mice (termed "Nes-Met") in which met is inactivated from midembryonic stages onward in the CNS only. Adult animals showed motor behavioral defects suggestive of impaired innervation of pectoral muscles. Correspondingly, in neonatal spinal cords of Nes-Met mutants, we observed death of a discrete population of pea3-expressing MNs at brachial levels. Axonal tracing using pea3 reporter mice revealed a novel target muscle of pea3-expressing MNs: the pectoralis minor muscle. In Nes-Met mice, the pectoralis minor pool initially innervated its target muscle, but required HGF/Met for survival, hence for proper maintenance of muscle innervation. In contrast, HGF/Met was dispensable for the survival of neighboring Met-expressing MN pools, despite its earlier functions for their specification and axon growth. Our results demonstrate the exquisite degree to which outcomes of signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases are regulated on a cell-by-cell basis. They also provide a model for one way in which the multiplicity of neurotrophic factors may allow for regulation of MN numbers in a pool-specific manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2198-11.2011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6623376PMC
August 2011

Interleukin-13 interferes with CFTR and AQP5 expression and localization during human airway epithelial cell differentiation.

Exp Cell Res 2007 Jul 21;313(12):2695-702. Epub 2007 Mar 21.

Laboratoire de Cytophysiologie et Toxicologie Cellulaire, Université Paris 7, Tour 53-54, Paris cedex 05, France.

Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a central regulator of Th2-dominated respiratory disorders such as asthma. Lesions of the airway epithelial barrier frequently observed in chronic respiratory inflammatory diseases are repaired through proliferation, migration and differentiation of epithelial cells. Our work is focused on the effects of IL-13 in human cellular models of airway epithelial cell regeneration. We have previously shown that IL-13 altered epithelial cell polarity during mucociliary differentiation of human nasal epithelial cells. In particular, the cytokine inhibited ezrin expression and interfered with its apical localization during epithelial cell differentiation in vitro. Here we show that CFTR expression is enhanced in the presence of the cytokine, that two additional CFTR protein isoforms are expressed in IL-13-treated cells and that part of the protein is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum. We further show that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel localized within the apical membrane of epithelial cells, is completely abolished in the presence of the cytokine. These results show that IL-13 interferes with ion and water channel expression and localization during epithelial regeneration and may thereby influence mucus composition and hydration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yexcr.2007.02.035DOI Listing
July 2007

Identification of ICIS-1, a new protein involved in cilia stability.

Front Biosci 2007 Jan 1;12:1661-9. Epub 2007 Jan 1.

Laboratoire de Cytophysiologie et Toxicologie Cellulaire, Universite Paris 7, France.

Cilia are specialized organelles that exert critical functions in numerous organisms, including that of cell motility, fluid transport and protozoan locomotion. Ciliary architecture and function strictly depend on basal body formation, migration and axoneme elongation. Numerous ultrastructural studies have been undertaken in different species to elucidate the process of ciliogenesis. Recent analyses have led to identification of genes specifically expressed in ciliated organisms, but most proteins involved in ciliogenesis remain uncharacterized. Using human nasal epithelial cells capable of ciliary differentiation in vitro, differential display was carried out to identify new proteins associated with ciliogenesis. We isolated a new gene, ICIS-1 (Involved in CIlia Stability-1), upregulated during mucociliary differentiation. This gene is localized within the TGF-beta1 promoter and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Functional analyses of gene expression inhibition by RNA interference in Paramecium tetraurelia indicated that the ICIS-1 homologue interfered with cilia stability or formation. These findings demonstrate that ICIS-1 is a new protein associated with ciliated cells and potentially related to cilia stability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2741/2178DOI Listing
January 2007
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