Publications by authors named "Natasha L Rudy"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Constrained chromatin accessibility in PU.1-mutated agammaglobulinemia patients.

J Exp Med 2021 Jul 5;218(7). Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

The pioneer transcription factor (TF) PU.1 controls hematopoietic cell fate by decompacting stem cell heterochromatin and allowing nonpioneer TFs to enter otherwise inaccessible genomic sites. PU.1 deficiency fatally arrests lymphopoiesis and myelopoiesis in mice, but human congenital PU.1 disorders have not previously been described. We studied six unrelated agammaglobulinemic patients, each harboring a heterozygous mutation (four de novo, two unphased) of SPI1, the gene encoding PU.1. Affected patients lacked circulating B cells and possessed few conventional dendritic cells. Introducing disease-similar SPI1 mutations into human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells impaired early in vitro B cell and myeloid cell differentiation. Patient SPI1 mutations encoded destabilized PU.1 proteins unable to nuclear localize or bind target DNA. In PU.1-haploinsufficient pro-B cell lines, euchromatin was less accessible to nonpioneer TFs critical for B cell development, and gene expression patterns associated with the pro- to pre-B cell transition were undermined. Our findings molecularly describe a novel form of agammaglobulinemia and underscore PU.1's critical, dose-dependent role as a hematopoietic euchromatin gatekeeper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.20201750DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8105723PMC
July 2021

A previously unrecognized 22q13.2 microdeletion syndrome that encompasses TCF20 and TNFRSF13C.

Am J Med Genet A 2018 12 14;176(12):2791-2797. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Department of Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS, OMIM 606232) is a heterozygous contiguous gene microdeletion syndrome occurring at the distal region of chromosome 22q13. This deletion encompasses the SHANK3 gene at 22q13.33, which is thought to be the critical gene for the neurodevelopmental features seen in this syndrome. PMS is typically characterized by intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, absent to severely delayed speech, neonatal hypotonia, and dysmorphic features. Two patients presenting with classic clinical features of PMS have been reported to have interstitial microdeletions in the 22q13.2 region that map proximal to the SHANK3 gene (0.54 and 0.72 Mb, respectively). Here, we describe a 13-month-old girl with a de novo 1.16 Mb interstitial deletion in the 22q13.2 region who presented with global developmental delay, subtle dysmorphic features, and immunodeficiency. This deletion overlaps with the two previously published cases and five cases from the DECIPHER database. All eight patients share features common to patients with PMS including developmental delay and language delay, which suggests that this represents a previously unrecognized microdeletion syndrome in the 22q13.2 region. Our patient's deletion encompasses the TCF20 and TNFRSF13C genes, which are thought to play causative roles in the patient's neurodevelopmental and immunological features, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.40492DOI Listing
December 2018