Publications by authors named "Natalia Juliá-Palacios"

7 Publications

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U-IMD: the first Unified European registry for inherited metabolic diseases.

Orphanet J Rare Dis 2021 Feb 18;16(1):95. Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Division of Neuropediatrics and Metabolic Medicine, Department of General Pediatrics, Centre for Child and Adolescent Medicine, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Following the broad application of new analytical methods, more and more pathophysiological processes in previously unknown diseases have been elucidated. The spectrum of clinical presentation of rare inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) is broad and ranges from single organ involvement to multisystemic diseases. With the aim of overcoming the limited knowledge about the natural course, current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, the project has established the first unified patient registry for IMDs that fully meets the requirements of the European Infrastructure for Rare Diseases (ERDRI).

Results: In collaboration with the European Reference Network for Rare Hereditary Metabolic Disorders (MetabERN), the Unified European registry for Inherited Metabolic Diseases (U-IMD) was established to collect patient data as an observational, non-interventional natural history study. Following the recommendations of the ERDRI the U-IMD registry uses common data elements to define the IMDs, report the clinical phenotype, describe the biochemical markers and to capture the drug treatment. Until today, more than 1100 IMD patients have been registered.

Conclusion: The U-IMD registry is the first observational, non-interventional patient registry that encompasses all known IMDs. Full semantic interoperability for other registries has been achieved, as demonstrated by the use of a minimum common core data set for equivalent description of metabolic patients in U-IMD and in the patient registry of the European Rare Kidney Disease Reference Network (ERKNet). In conclusion, the U-IMD registry will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term course of IMDs and improved patients care by understanding the natural disease course and by enabling an optimization of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13023-021-01726-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7893973PMC
February 2021

GRIN database: A unified and manually curated repertoire of GRIN variants.

Hum Mutat 2021 Jan 30;42(1):8-18. Epub 2020 Nov 30.

School of International Studies, ESCI-UPF, Barcelona, Spain.

Glutamatergic neurotransmission is crucial for brain development, wiring neuronal function, and synaptic plasticity mechanisms. Recent genetic studies showed the existence of autosomal dominant de novo GRIN gene variants associated with GRIN-related disorders (GRDs), a rare pediatric neurological disorder caused by N-methyl- d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction. Notwithstanding, GRIN variants identification is exponentially growing and their clinical, genetic, and functional annotations remain highly fragmented, representing a bottleneck in GRD patient's stratification. To shorten the gap between GRIN variant identification and patient stratification, we present the GRIN database (GRINdb), a publicly available, nonredundant, updated, and curated database gathering all available genetic, functional, and clinical data from more than 4000 GRIN variants. The manually curated GRINdb outputs on a web server, allowing query and retrieval of reported GRIN variants, and thus representing a fast and reliable bioinformatics resource for molecular clinical advice. Furthermore, the comprehensive mapping of GRIN variants' genetic and clinical information along NMDAR structure revealed important differences in GRIN variants' pathogenicity and clinical phenotypes, shedding light on GRIN-specific fingerprints. Overall, the GRINdb and web server is a resource for molecular stratification of GRIN variants, delivering clinical and investigational insights into GRDs. GRINdb is accessible at http://lmc.uab.es/grindb.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.24141DOI Listing
January 2021

Laboratory Diagnosis of a Case with Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency.

Clin Chem 2020 Nov;66(11):1465-1467

Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, Clinical Biochemistry, Paediatric Neurology and Genetics Departments, Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/clinchem/hvaa202DOI Listing
November 2020

Disease-associated GRIN protein truncating variants trigger NMDA receptor loss-of-function.

Hum Mol Genet 2021 Feb;29(24):3859-3871

Neuroscience Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08908 Barcelona, Spain.

De novo GRIN variants, encoding for the ionotropic glutamate NMDA receptor subunits, have been recently associated with GRIN-related disorders, a group of rare paediatric encephalopathies. Current investigational and clinical efforts are focused to functionally stratify GRIN variants, towards precision therapies of this primary disturbance of glutamatergic transmission that affects neuronal function and brain. In the present study, we aimed to comprehensively delineate the functional outcomes and clinical phenotypes of GRIN protein truncating variants (PTVs)-accounting for ~20% of disease-associated GRIN variants-hypothetically provoking NMDAR hypofunctionality. To tackle this question, we created a comprehensive GRIN PTVs variants database compiling a cohort of nine individuals harbouring GRIN PTVs, together with previously identified variants, to build-up an extensive GRIN PTVs repertoire composed of 293 unique variants. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies were conducted, followed by cell-based assays of selected paradigmatic GRIN PTVs and their functional annotation. Genetic and clinical phenotypes meta-analysis revealed that heterozygous GRIN1, GRIN2C, GRIN2D, GRIN3A and GRIN3B PTVs are non-pathogenic. In contrast, heterozygous GRIN2A and GRIN2B PTVs are associated with specific neurological clinical phenotypes in a subunit- and domain-dependent manner. Mechanistically, cell-based assays showed that paradigmatic pathogenic GRIN2A and GRIN2B PTVs result on a decrease of NMDAR surface expression and NMDAR-mediated currents, ultimately leading to NMDAR functional haploinsufficiency. Overall, these findings contribute to delineate GRIN PTVs genotype-phenotype association and GRIN variants stratification. Functional studies showed that GRIN2A and GRIN2B pathogenic PTVs trigger NMDAR hypofunctionality, and thus accelerate therapeutic decisions for this neurodevelopmental condition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddaa220DOI Listing
February 2021

Cataract in You-Hoover-Fong syndrome: TELO2 deficiency.

Ophthalmic Genet 2020 12 17;41(6):656-658. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

Ophthalmology Department, Sant Joan de deu Hospital , Barcelona, Spain.

Introduction: Recently, You, Hoover-Fong, and colleagues described a disease caused by a deficiency of the telomere maintenance 2 gene () function. The clinical spectrum includes early-onset global delay, dysmorphic facial features, auditory disorder, and reduced vision.

Materials And Methods: We report two siblings, diagnosed with You-Hoover-Fong syndrome at the age of 28 and 14 months. Both were genetically studied to find the cause of their developmental delay and microcephaly.

Results: The identical compound heterozygous missense mutations in the gene were found in each. Ophthalmologically, both siblings were diagnosed with progressive congenital bilateral nuclear-lamellar cataracts.

Conclusions: We report nuclear-lamellar cataracts in two siblings diagnosed with You-Hoover-Fong syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13816810.2020.1821382DOI Listing
December 2020

Galactokinase deficiency: lessons from the GalNet registry.

Genet Med 2021 Jan 18;23(1):202-210. Epub 2020 Aug 18.

Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Purpose: Galactokinase (GALK1) deficiency is a rare hereditary galactose metabolism disorder. Beyond cataract, the phenotypic spectrum is questionable. Data from affected patients included in the Galactosemias Network registry were collected to better characterize the phenotype.

Methods: Observational study collecting medical data of 53 not previously reported GALK1 deficient patients from 17 centers in 11 countries from December 2014 to April 2020.

Results: Neonatal or childhood cataract was reported in 15 and 4 patients respectively. The occurrence of neonatal hypoglycemia and infection were comparable with the general population, whereas bleeding diathesis (8.1% versus 2.17-5.9%) and encephalopathy (3.9% versus 0.3%) were reported more often. Elevated transaminases were seen in 25.5%. Cognitive delay was reported in 5 patients. Urinary galactitol was elevated in all patients at diagnosis; five showed unexpected Gal-1-P increase. Most patients showed enzyme activities ≤1%. Eleven different genotypes were described, including six unpublished variants. The majority was homozygous for NM_000154.1:c.82C>A (p.Pro28Thr). Thirty-five patients were diagnosed following newborn screening, which was clearly beneficial.

Conclusion: The phenotype of GALK1 deficiency may include neonatal elevation of transaminases, bleeding diathesis, and encephalopathy in addition to cataract. Potential complications beyond the neonatal period are not systematically surveyed and a better delineation is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-00942-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7790741PMC
January 2021