Publications by authors named "Natalia Bocharova"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Relative expansion of CD19-negative very-early normal B-cell precursors in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after CD19 targeting by blinatumomab and CAR-T cell therapy: implications for flow cytometric detection of minimal residual disease.

Br J Haematol 2021 May 14;193(3):602-612. Epub 2021 Mar 14.

National Research and Clinical Center for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation.

CD19-directed treatment in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) frequently leads to the downmodulation of targeted antigens. As multicolour flow cytometry (MFC) application for minimal/measurable residual disease (MRD) assessment in BCP-ALL is based on B-cell compartment study, CD19 loss could hamper MFC-MRD monitoring after blinatumomab or chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy. The use of other antigens (CD22, CD10, CD79a, etc.) as B-lineage gating markers allows the identification of CD19-negative leukaemia, but it could also lead to misidentification of normal very-early CD19-negative BCPs as tumour blasts. In the current study, we summarized the results of the investigation of CD19-negative normal BCPs in 106 children with BCP-ALL who underwent CD19 targeting (blinatumomab, n = 64; CAR-T, n = 25; or both, n = 17). It was found that normal CD19-negative BCPs could be found in bone marrow after CD19-directed treatment more frequently than in healthy donors and children with BCP-ALL during chemotherapy or after stem cell transplantation. Analysis of the antigen expression profile revealed that normal CD19-negative BCPs could be mixed up with residual leukaemic blasts, even in bioinformatic analyses of MFC data. The results of our study should help to investigate MFC-MRD more accurately in patients who have undergone CD19-targeted therapy, even in cases with normal CD19-negative BCP expansion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.17382DOI Listing
May 2021

Correlates between feeding ecology and mercury levels in historical and modern arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

PLoS One 2013 6;8(5):e60879. Epub 2013 May 6.

Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Faculty of Biology, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia.

Changes in concentration of pollutants and pathogen distribution can vary among ecotypes (e.g. marine versus terrestrial food resources). This may have important implications for the animals that reside within them. We examined 1) canid pathogen presence in an endangered arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) population and 2) relative total mercury (THg) level as a function of ecotype ('coastal' or 'inland') for arctic foxes to test whether the presence of pathogens or heavy metal concentration correlate with population health. The Bering Sea populations on Bering and Mednyi Islands were compared to Icelandic arctic fox populations with respect to inland and coastal ecotypes. Serological and DNA based pathogen screening techniques were used to examine arctic foxes for pathogens. THg was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry from hair samples of historical and modern collected arctic foxes and samples from their prey species (hair and internal organs). Presence of pathogens did not correlate with population decline from Mednyi Island. However, THg concentration correlated strongly with ecotype and was reflected in the THg concentrations detected in available food sources in each ecotype. The highest concentration of THg was found in ecotypes where foxes depended on marine vertebrates for food. Exclusively inland ecotypes had low THg concentrations. The results suggest that absolute exposure to heavy metals may be less important than the feeding ecology and feeding opportunities of top predators such as arctic foxes which may in turn influence population health and stability. A higher risk to wildlife of heavy metal exposure correlates with feeding strategies that rely primarily on a marine based diet.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0060879PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3645996PMC
December 2013

Unexpected link between anaphase promoting complex and the toxicity of expanded polyglutamines expressed in yeast.

Cell Cycle 2008 Dec 12;7(24):3943-6. Epub 2008 Dec 12.

Faculty of Bioengineering and Bioinformatics, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia.

Protein aggregation is intimately linked to a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Expansion of the huntingtin polyglutamine-rich domain causes protein aggregation and neuronal degeneration. Recently we found that, similar to neurons, yeast expressing the expanded domain show markers of programmed cell death. Here we showed that deletion of yeast metacaspase gene YCA1 partly rescues the toxic effect of the domain overexpression. We also performed genetic screen for other genes deletions alleviating the toxic effect and found ASE1. Ase1 is a substrate of the Cdh1 form of anaphase promoting complex, APC/Cdh1. We tested Cdh1 overexpression and the deletion of CLB2 (mitotic cyclin, substrate of APC/Cdh1) and found that both mutations had a rescuing effect on the expanded polyglutamine toxicity. Our data suggest that the toxic effect of aggregated proteins is partly indirect. We speculate that cellular attempt to degrade the aggregates overloads the proteasome, and this leads to pathological accumulation of APC substrates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/cc.7.24.7398DOI Listing
December 2008

Expression of an expanded polyglutamine domain in yeast causes death with apoptotic markers.

Biochim Biophys Acta 2006 May-Jun;1757(5-6):660-6. Epub 2006 May 12.

A.N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992, Russia.

Huntington's disease is caused by specific mutations in huntingtin protein. Expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat of huntingtin leads to protein aggregation in neurons followed by cell death with apoptotic markers. The connection between the aggregation and the degeneration of neurons is poorly understood. Here, we show that the physiological consequences of expanded polyQ domain expression in yeast are similar to those in neurons. In particular, expression of expanded polyQ in yeast causes apoptotic changes in mitochondria, caspase activation, nuclear DNA fragmentation and death. Similar to neurons, at the late stages of expression the expanded polyQ accumulates in the nuclei and seems to affect the cell cycle of yeast. Interestingly, nuclear localization of the aggregates is dependent on functional caspase Yca1. We speculate that the aggregates in the nuclei disturb the cell cycle and thus contribute to the development of the cell death process in both systems. Our data show that expression of the polyQ construct in yeast can be used to model patho-physiological effects of polyQ expansion in neurons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbabio.2006.05.004DOI Listing
September 2006