Publications by authors named "Nasiru Ibrahim"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Whole-genome analysis of Nigerian patients with breast cancer reveals ethnic-driven somatic evolution and distinct genomic subtypes.

Nat Commun 2021 11 26;12(1):6946. Epub 2021 Nov 26.

Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics and Global Health, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.

Black women across the African diaspora experience more aggressive breast cancer with higher mortality rates than white women of European ancestry. Although inter-ethnic germline variation is known, differential somatic evolution has not been investigated in detail. Analysis of deep whole genomes of 97 breast cancers, with RNA-seq in a subset, from women in Nigeria in comparison with The Cancer Genome Atlas (n = 76) reveal a higher rate of genomic instability and increased intra-tumoral heterogeneity as well as a unique genomic subtype defined by early clonal GATA3 mutations with a 10.5-year younger age at diagnosis. We also find non-coding mutations in bona fide drivers (ZNF217 and SYPL1) and a previously unreported INDEL signature strongly associated with African ancestry proportion, underscoring the need to expand inclusion of diverse populations in biomedical research. Finally, we demonstrate that characterizing tumors for homologous recombination deficiency has significant clinical relevance in stratifying patients for potentially life-saving therapies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-27079-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8626467PMC
November 2021

Chronic neck sinus secondary to retained polyglactin 910 suture following sub-total thyroidectomy: a case study.

J Wound Care 2020 Aug;29(Sup8):S8-S10

Department of Surgery, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, 1-4 Oba Akinjobi Street, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

Objective: Reaction to sutures is a rare cause of non-healing in clean wounds. Cases of severe reaction to silk sutures have been reported, causing chronic infection and failure of thyroidectomy wound healing. We report a case of retained polyglactin 910 suture presenting with a chronically discharging sinus of the neck after sub-total thyroidectomy.

Case: The patient, a 37-year old female, presented with a simple benign multinodular goitre. She had subtotal thyroidectomy and was discharged on day six postoperatively, after satisfactory primary wound healing. The patient observed swelling, pus/discharge and extrusion of the suture in the neck three weeks after surgery. Discharge did not stop after initial wound debridement under local anaesthesia. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed a small area of ring-enhancement soft tissue density, anterior to the right thyroid remnant. Subsequent wound exploration under general anaesthesia revealed a sinus tract extending to the thyroid bed with undegraded strands of thickened polyglactin 910 suture. Suture remnants were removed and the wound healed satisfactorily a week later.

Conclusion: Non-healing post thyroidectomy wounds should raise suspicion of a retained suture. Early recognition and surgical intervention will shorten the period of morbidity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/jowc.2020.29.Sup8.S8DOI Listing
August 2020

A prospective randomized comparative study of targeted versus empirical prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of infective complications following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

Ann Afr Med 2019 Jul-Sep;18(3):132-137

Urology Division, Department of Surgery, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital; Urology Division, Department of Surgery, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Lagos, Nigeria.

Background: It is established that antibiotic prophylaxis prevents infection following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. This study compares the infective complications in transrectal prostate biopsy (TRPB) in empirical versus targeted prophylactic antibiotics.

Patients And Methods: Urine and rectal swabs were obtained prior to TRPB. They were randomized into targeted antibiotic (TA) and empirical antibiotic (EA) groups. TA had prophylactic antibiotics according to rectal swab culture, whereas EA had the standard parenteral ciprofloxacin. They were followed up weekly for 4 weeks. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare categorical variables, Student's "t"-test was used to compare means of numerical variables, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: One hundred patients were studied, fifty in each group. The mean age was 66 years, with men aged 60-69 years accounting for 50% of the study population. Providencia stuartii, Escherichia coli, and Citrobacter freundii were the most predominant bacteria identified in the prebiopsy rectal swab culture, with resistance to ciprofloxacin (57%) being much more common than that to levofloxacin (21%). Postbiopsy infection occurred in one (2%) patient in the TA group and five (10%) patients in the EA group. Difference in the infection rate between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.042). Three of the patients with postbiopsy infection in the EA group had urosepsis and required hospitalization. Fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria were responsible for infection in all the six patients. TA reduced the risk of postbiopsy infection by 5.6 folds.

Conclusion: TA was associated with a decreased risk of infection in TRPB.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aam.aam_48_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6704807PMC
February 2020

Germline variants and somatic mutation signatures of breast cancer across populations of African and European ancestry in the US and Nigeria.

Int J Cancer 2019 12 27;145(12):3321-3333. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics & Global Health, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Somatic mutation signatures may represent footprints of genetic and environmental exposures that cause different cancer. Few studies have comprehensively examined their association with germline variants, and none in an indigenous African population. SomaticSignatures was employed to extract mutation signatures based on whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing data from female patients with breast cancer (TCGA, training set, n = 1,011; Nigerian samples, validation set, n = 170), and to estimate contributions of signatures in each sample. Association between somatic signatures and common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or rare deleterious variants were examined using linear regression. Nine stable signatures were inferred, and four signatures (APOBEC C>T, APOBEC C>G, aging and homologous recombination deficiency) were highly similar to known COSMIC signatures and explained the majority (60-85%) of signature contributions. There were significant heritable components associated with APOBEC C>T signature (h = 0.575, p = 0.010) and the combined APOBEC signatures (h = 0.432, p = 0.042). In TCGA dataset, seven common SNPs within or near GNB5 were significantly associated with an increased proportion (beta = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.21-0.45) of APOBEC signature contribution at genome-wide significance, while rare germline mutations in MTCL1 was also significantly associated with a higher contribution of this signature (p = 6.1 × 10 ). This is the first study to identify associations between germline variants and mutational patterns in breast cancer across diverse populations and geography. The findings provide evidence to substantiate causal links between germline genetic risk variants and carcinogenesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6851589PMC
December 2019

Author Correction: Characterization of Nigerian breast cancer reveals prevalent homologous recombination deficiency and aggressive molecular features.

Nat Commun 2019 01 14;10(1):288. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Surgery, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

The original version of this Article contained an error in the author affiliations. The affiliation of Kevin P. White with Tempus Labs, Inc. Chicago, IL, USA was inadvertently omitted. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-07886-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6331546PMC
January 2019

Characterization of Nigerian breast cancer reveals prevalent homologous recombination deficiency and aggressive molecular features.

Nat Commun 2018 10 16;9(1):4181. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Department of Surgery, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

Racial/ethnic disparities in breast cancer mortality continue to widen but genomic studies rarely interrogate breast cancer in diverse populations. Through genome, exome, and RNA sequencing, we examined the molecular features of breast cancers using 194 patients from Nigeria and 1037 patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Relative to Black and White cohorts in TCGA, Nigerian HR + /HER2 - tumors are characterized by increased homologous recombination deficiency signature, pervasive TP53 mutations, and greater structural variation-indicating aggressive biology. GATA3 mutations are also more frequent in Nigerians regardless of subtype. Higher proportions of APOBEC-mediated substitutions strongly associate with PIK3CA and CDH1 mutations, which are underrepresented in Nigerians and Blacks. PLK2, KDM6A, and B2M are also identified as previously unreported significantly mutated genes in breast cancer. This dataset provides novel insights into potential molecular mechanisms underlying outcome disparities and lay a foundation for deployment of precision therapeutics in underserved populations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06616-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6191428PMC
October 2018

Road Traffic Injury in Lagos, Nigeria: Assessing Prehospital Care.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2017 Aug 2;32(4):424-430. Epub 2017 May 2.

Department of Surgery,Lagos State University Teaching Hospital,Ikeja,Lagos,Nigeria.

Introduction Injuries are the third most important cause of overall deaths globally with one-quarter resulting from road traffic crashes. Majority of these deaths occur before arrival in the hospital and can be reduced with prompt and efficient prehospital care. The aim of this study was to highlight the burden of road traffic injury (RTI) in Lagos, Nigeria and assess the effectiveness of prehospital care, especially the role of Lagos State Ambulance Service (LASAMBUS) in providing initial care and transportation of the injured to the hospital.

Methods: A three-year, retrospective review of road traffic injured patients seen at the Surgical Emergency Room (SER) of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja, Nigeria, from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014 was conducted. Parameters extracted from the Institution Trauma Registry included bio-data, date and time of injury, date and time of arrival in SER, host status, type of vehicle involved, and region(s) injured. Information on how patients came to the hospital and outcome in SER also were recorded. Results were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS; IBM Corporation; Armonk, New York USA) version 16.

Results: A total of 23,537 patients were seen during the study period. Among them, 16,024 (68.1%) had trauma. Road traffic crashes were responsible in 5,629 (35.0%) of trauma cases. Passengers constituted 42.0% of the injured, followed by pedestrians (34.0%). Four wheelers were the most frequent vehicle type involved (54.0%), followed by motor cycles (30.0%). Regions mainly affected were head and neck (40.0%) and lower limb (29.0%). Less than one-quarter (24.0%) presented to the emergency room within an hour, while one-third arrived between one and six hours following injury. Relatives brought 55.4%, followed by bystanders (21.4%). Only 2.3% had formal prehospital care and were brought to the hospital by LASAMBUS. They also had significantly shorter arrival time. One hundred and nine patients (1.9%) died in the emergency room while 235 bodies were brought in dead.

Conclusion: Less than three percent among the victims of road crashes had formal prehospital care and shorter hospital arrival time. Current facilities for emergency prehospital care in Lagos are inadequate and require improvement. Training lay first-responders, who bring the majority of the injured to hospital, in basic first-aid may improve prehospital care in Lagos. Ibrahim NA , Ajani AWO , Mustafa IA , Balogun RA , Oludara MA , Idowu OE , Solagberu BA . Road traffic injury in Lagos, Nigeria: assessing prehospital care. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):424-430.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X17006410DOI Listing
August 2017

Practice of first aid in burn related injuries in a developing country.

Burns 2015 Sep 21;41(6):1322-32. Epub 2015 Mar 21.

Burn/Trauma Center, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH)/Burns and Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Lagos State University (LASU), Ikeja-Lagos, Nigeria.

Introduction: First aid with cool running water reduces the severity of burn. Low level of knowledge of first aid in burns was shown in previous studies with few patients receiving first aid by water lavage. A study investigating the use of water lavage as first aid in patients presenting to hospital with burn in Lagos, Nigeria was carried out.

Methods: Patients admitted to a University Teaching Hospital for treatment of burns were recruited for this prospective study. Data detailing demographics, scene and aetiology of burns, material used for first aid, who administered first aid, level of education and relationship of first-aider with patients, length of hospital stay, complications and outcome of treatment were collected and statistical analysis performed.

Results: 168 patients; 73 (43.4%) children and 95 (56.6%) adults were seen. Burns were sustained at home in 95 (74.2%) cases and outside in 33 (25.8%). Water lavage was used in 49 (29.2%) cases, raw eggs in 21 (12.5%), pap in 16 (9.5%) and other materials in 48.8%. 40 (23.8%) patients had not received any form of first aid at presentation. Patients that received no water first aid had higher complication rate (35.3% versus 18.4%) compared with those that had water first aid.

Conclusion And Recommendations: The use of water first aid in burns was shown to reduce complication rate in this study. People should be educated on the efficacy of water first aid in pre-hospital care of burns.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2015.02.018DOI Listing
September 2015

Pedestrian injuries in the most densely populated city in Nigeria-an epidemic calling for control.

Traffic Inj Prev 2015 15;16(2):184-9. Epub 2014 Oct 15.

a Department of Surgery , Lagos State University Teaching Hospital , Ikeja , Lagos State , Nigeria.

Objectives: Since the first pedestrian road fatality of 1896, pedestrians still remain vulnerable, with fatalities in Africa being 55% of global statistics. Many previous reports from Nigeria have emphasized passengers and drivers over pedestrians; this study was done in the most densely populated Nigerian city with no previous publication exclusively dedicated to pedestrians-the megacity has been projected by the World Bank to be the third largest in the world by 2015 (after Tokyo and Mumbai), so the study results would aid injury control and reduce morbidity and mortality.

Methods: This is a one-year prospective study on pedestrians attending the surgical emergency room of the busiest referral hospital in Lagos, Nigeria, detailing age, sex, occupation, regions injured, injury mechanism, incident vehicles, highway collisions, and immediate outcomes.

Results: Some 702 pedestrians were seen, including 494 (70%) males with overall peak incidence in the third decade, but the peak incidence among females is lower and in the first decade. Common injuries sustained were to the head (40%), lower limbs (35%), upper limbs (9%), multiple regions (6%), pelvis (3%), and others (7%). Gender differences also were noted-the predominant injury location in males was the head, followed by lower limbs; the opposite was true for females, though both regional injuries were fewer in females than in males. Students were 20% of the entire pedestrians, with nearly half of them injured by a motorcycle. The mechanism of injury included crossing a highway (63%), walking along the pavement (17%), standing by a bus stop (12%), at a shop/house (5%), and others (3%). However, 76% injuries occurred on highways, 22% on inner city roads, and 2% elsewhere. Vehicles included motorcycles (33%), cars (27%), buses (22%), trucks (6%), tricycles (2.4%), and other (9%). Overall fatality was 10% and about half were due to being knocked down by buses and cars.

Conclusions: This study suggests a high incidence and significant underreporting of pedestrian injuries. A reduction in morbidity and mortality is possible (from head and lower limb injuries) by traffic calming techniques in crossing the highway, especially injuries due to being struck by motorcycles, cars, and buses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15389588.2014.921817DOI Listing
February 2015

Child pedestrian injury and fatality in a developing country.

Pediatr Surg Int 2014 Jun 8;30(6):625-32. Epub 2014 May 8.

Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria,

Purpose: Child pedestrian injuries and fatalities in developing countries continue to increase. We examined child pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the most populated urban agglomeration in Africa in order to develop control measures.

Methods: Two-year prospective study of injured child pedestrians (≤15 years) at the Surgical Emergency Room (SER) to determine demography, vehicles involved, road location, injury mechanism, pre-hospital transport, injury-arrival time, regions injured, injury severity and fatalities was done.

Results: Some 226 pedestrians (114 boys and 112 girls) comprising 42 children aged ≤4 years, 91 aged 5-9 years and 93 aged 10-15 years were seen with car collisions (83 pedestrians, 36.7%), motorcycles (76, 33.6%), buses (41, 18.1%), others (15, 6.6%) and 11 undetermined vehicles. Injuries on the highways were 147 (65%); inner-city roads 77 (34.1%) and two undetermined roads. Crossing the road was responsible for 168 (74.3%) pedestrian injuries; while three other mechanisms produced 58 (25.7%) patients. Regions injured were head (42.9%), lower limbs (35.4%) and others (21.7%). Relatives, bystanders and police/ambulance brought 186 (82.3%), 31 (13.7%) and eight (3.5%) children, respectively; and within 6 h (43.4, 11.5 and 2.2%) and after (38.9, 2.2 and 1.3%). Nineteen deaths (10 brought-in-dead, nine SER deaths) occurred; 15 of them girls, 15 had severe head injury, 15 were brought by relatives. However, fatality risks were truck collisions (OR 5.97), female child (OR 4.25), head injury (OR 4.18) and age ≤4 years (OR 3.7).

Conclusion: The equal sex incidence, worse female fatality despite similar exposure and injury severity with male, deserve further research. Improved pre-hospital and SER care is needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-014-3516-8DOI Listing
June 2014

Chronic ulcers in Ikeja-Lagos, Nigeria: an eighteen month review of infecting bacterial agents and susceptibility pattern.

Nig Q J Hosp Med 2013 Apr-Jun;23(2):145-8

Burns and Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Lagos State University (LASUCOM)/Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Nigeria.

Background: Chronic ulcers are an important cause of morbidity among surgical and medical patients. Infection in ulcers may delay healing and cause septicemia resulting in mortality. Microbial studies are important for the appropriate management of these ulcers.

Objective: The study investigates on eighteen month review of infecting bacterial agents and susceptibility pattern in chronic ulcers in Lagos, Nigeria.

Methods: Details of all patients treated for ulcers that were investigated at the department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja-Lagos, Nigeria between July 1st 2009 and December 31, 2010 were retrieved from the computer database and transferred into the proforma designed for the study. Data collected were demography, date of onset of ulcer, mode of specimen collection, names of isolates and drug sensitivity patterns.

Results: A total of 329 cases were seen and reviewed during the study period. Males constituted 50.2%, females 38.3% and the gender of the remaining 11.6% were not indicated. There were 259 (78.7%) adults and 42 (12.8%) children. The ages of 28 cases were not indicated. Microbial growths were obtained in 217 (66.7%) patients. Gram negative (Gn) organisms were isolated in 181(83.5%) and Gram positive (Gp) in 35 (16%). The most common isolates were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19.1%) Staphylococcus aureus (9.7%), Proteus mirabilis (7.6%) and Escherichia coil (7.3%). There were widespread resistances by the isolates to the common antibiotics in the study environment.

Conclusion: The wide spread resistance may be due to lack of an antibiotic use policy. Certain antibiotics should be reserved for second line treatment in the emergency setting
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2014

Physical activity and risk of gastric cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

Br J Sports Med 2015 Feb 16;49(4):224-9. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

Department of Surgery, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

Background: Studies evaluating the relationship of physical activity and stomach cancer risk have yielded inconsistent and largely inconclusive results. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies that assessed the relationship between physical activity and risk of gastric cancer.

Methods: Following a standard protocol, we searched medical literature databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Google Scholar) from inception to July 2012, and conducted a random effects meta-analysis.

Results: Seven prospective cohorts and four case-control studies of physical activity and gastric cancer risk, with 1,535,006 people and 7944 cases of gastric cancer were included. We found a modest protective association between sufficient physical activity and gastric cancer risk (relative risk: 0.81 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.96); I(2)=68.5%) in the prospective studies and (relative risk: 0.78 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.91); I(2)=0%) in case-control studies. The association appeared weaker in smokers than in non-smokers (p heterogeneity=0.035). The association may also be weaker for gastric cardia cancer relative to the distal non-cardia subtypes. Physical activity type (recreational or occupational), intake of alcohol, total energy intake, consumption of fruits and vegetables and infection with Helicobacter pylori had no influence on the association. The effect measure from cohort studies (relative risk: 0.82 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97); I(2)=61.7%) and case-control studies (relative risk: 0.83 (95% CI 0.66 to 1.04); I(2)=49.8%) did not differ materially at higher physical activity levels.

Conclusions: We conclude that a regular physical activity may be protective against stomach cancer risk.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2013-092778DOI Listing
February 2015

Bacteriology of infected burn wounds in the burn wards of a teaching hospital in Southwest Nigeria.

Burns 2013 Feb 3;39(1):168-73. Epub 2012 Mar 3.

Burns and Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Lagos State University (LASUCOM)/Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja-Lagos, Nigeria.

Background: Burns are characterized by the loss of varying proportions of the protective layers of the skin, depression of immune responses, and increased wound susceptibility to infection. Wound infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in burn cases. This study characterizes those factors that predispose burn wounds to infection and the bacteriology of the microorganisms in our environment.

Patients And Methods: Prospective study of burns patients that were admitted and treated at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja-Lagos, Nigeria between January 1 and May 31, 2010 was carried out. Information about the demographics, aetiology/mechanism of burns, interval between the time of injury and admission, microbial studies, and antibiotic therapy were collected and analyzed.

Results: A total of 74 patients consisting of 43 males and 31 females were seen. The ages range between one week and 95 ± 22.42 years. Wound infections were confirmed in 28 patients (infection rate of 37.84 per 100 patients). Delayed presentation at LASUTH and length of hospital stay were significantly related to the development of wound infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis were the most common infective organisms occurring in 53.6 and 10.7 percentages respectively. The isolated organisms were resistant to the beta-lactam antibiotics and mostly sensitive to carbapenem and aztreonam preparations.

Conclusion: Factors predisposing to invasive wound infections in our environment were highlighted and suggestions made on methods that could reduce the infections and thus reduce morbidity and mortality in burns.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2012.02.005DOI Listing
February 2013

Ectopic thyroid: etiology, pathology and management.

Hormones (Athens) 2011 Oct-Dec;10(4):261-9

Department of Surgery, Lagos State University College of Medicine and Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14310/horm.2002.1317DOI Listing
May 2012

Knowledge of risk factors, beliefs and practices of female healthcare professionals towards breast cancer in a tertiary institution in Lagos, Nigeria.

BMC Cancer 2009 Mar 4;9:76. Epub 2009 Mar 4.

Department of Surgery, Lagos State University College of Medicine and Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.

Background: Breast cancer is the leading female malignancy in Nigeria. Screening for early detection has led to reduction in mortality from the disease. It is known that attitudes of physicians and motivation by community nurses influence uptake of screening methods by women. This study aims to investigate knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, beliefs about treatment and practice of screening methods among a cohort of female healthcare professionals in Lagos, Nigeria.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, beliefs about treatment and practice of screening methods among 207 female doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals working in a university teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Stratified random sampling method was employed. Chi square test, analysis of variance and Mantel-Haenszel test were performed in data analysis using SPSS v10.0 and Epi Info version 6 statistical packages.

Results: Female doctors obtained a mean knowledge score of 74% and were the only professional group that had satisfactory knowledge of risk factors. Majority (86%) believed that early breast cancer is curable while half of participants believed that prayer can make breast cancer disappear from the affected breast. Eighty three percent practice breast self-examination (BSE) once a month and only 8% have ever had a mammogram. Age, knowledge of risk factors, profession and beliefs were not significantly associated with rate of BSE in this study.

Conclusion: Results from this study suggest the need for continuing medical education programmes aimed at improving knowledge of breast cancer among female healthcare providers other than doctors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-9-76DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2656542PMC
March 2009
-->