Publications by authors named "Nasim Ashoori Saheli"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Is Spinal Anesthesia with Low Dose Lidocaine Better than Sevoflorane Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Hip Fracture Surgery.

Arch Bone Jt Surg 2017 Jul;5(4):226-230

Anesthesiology Research Center, Guilan University of Medical Sciences (GUMS), Rasht, Iran.

Background: To evaluate general anesthesia with sevoflurane vs spinal anesthesia with low dose lidocaine 5% on hemodynamics changes in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery.

Methods: In this randomized double blind trial 100 patients (50 patients in each group) older than 60 years under hip surgery were randomized in general anesthesia with sevoflurane and spinal anesthesia with lidocaine 5%. Hemodynamic changes including mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate, blood loss, pain severity, nausea and vomiting and opioids consumption were compared in two groups.

Results: During surgery, difference between two groups regarding changes in mean arterial pressure was not significant, but the changes in heart rate were significantly different. Mean arterial pressure changes during recovery between two groups were significantly different. But there was no significant difference in heart rate changes. Bleeding in the sevoflurane group was significantly more than spinal group (513.ml vs. 365 ml). Moreover, AS Score, opioid consumption, and the nausea and vomiting in spinal anesthesia group was significantly lower than the sevoflurane group.

Conclusion: We showed that general anesthesia with sevoflurane and spinal anesthesia with low dose lidocaine 5% have comparable effects on hemodynamics changes in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. However postoperative pain score, vomiting and morphine consumption in patients with spinal anesthesia were lower than general anesthesia.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5592363PMC
July 2017

The effect of magnesium sulfate on motor and sensory axillary plexus blockade.

Anesth Pain Med 2015 Feb 1;5(1):e21943. Epub 2015 Feb 1.

Anesthesiology Research Centre, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Background: Magnesium is a physiologic cation that blocks neuromuscular transmission and does not allow the nerve to be stimulated.

Objectives: This study investigates the effect of adding magnesium sulfate to lidocaine to extend the duration of sensory and motor blocks of the axillary plexus in orthopedic surgeries of the upper extremities.

Patients And Methods: This controlled randomized double-blind study was performed on patients who were candidates for orthopedic surgery of the upper extremities. A total of 60 patients between 18-60 years with ASA Class 1 or 2 participated in the study. One group received lidocaine (5 mg/kg) with magnesium sulfate 20% (3 mL) as the case group, while the second group received lidocaine (5 mg/kg) with normal saline (3 mL) as a placebo to block the axillary plexus using the trans-arterial technique. The duration of the sensory and motor block of the axillary plexus was monitored and evaluated using the pinprick and modified Bromage scale.

Results: A total of 60 patients were included in the study with 30 patients having received lidocaine plus magnesium and the other 30 patients having received lidocaine plus normal saline. The mean sensory block duration in the case group was 248.83 ± 18.36 and in control group was 204.67 ± 22.62. The mean motor block duration in the case group was 207.0 ± 16.64 and in control group was 147.33 ± 21.52 (both P < 0.0001). The mean onset of sensory block in case group was 15.5 ± 3.79 and the onset block in control group was 10.33 ± 4.13 (P < 0.0001). The mean onset of motor block in case group was 20.66 ± 4.09 and the onset block in control group was 19.73 ± 26.18 (P < 0.848).

Conclusions: The addition of magnesium sulfate to lidocaine increased the duration of motor and sensory axillary block in the upper extremities during surgeries when compared to the use of lidocaine alone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/aapm.21943DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4363737PMC
February 2015