Publications by authors named "Nariaki Odawara"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Detection of circulating colorectal cancer cells by a custom microfluid system before and after endoscopic metallic stent placement.

Oncol Lett 2019 Dec 4;18(6):6397-6404. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan.

Although the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) should be crucial for future personalized medicine, no efficient and flexible methods have been established. The current study established a polymeric custom-made chip for capturing CTCs with a high efficiency and flexibility. As an example of clinical application, the effects of self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement on the release of cancer cells into the blood of patients with colorectal cancer and bowel obstruction were analyzed. This was assessed as the placement of SEMS may cause mechanical damage and physical force to malignant tissue, increasing the risk of cancer cell release into the bloodstream. The present study examined the number of CTCs using a custom-made chip, before, at 24 h after and at 4 days after SEMS placement in patients with colorectal cancer. The results revealed that, among the 13 patients examined, the number of CTCs was increased in three cases at 24 h after SEMS placement. However, this increase was temporary. The number of CTCs also decreased at 4 days after stent placement in most cases. The CTC chip of the current study detected the number of CD133-positive cancer stem-like cells, which did not change, even in the patient whose total number of CTCs temporarily increased. The results indicated that this custom-made microfluid system can efficiently and flexibly detect CTCs, demonstrating its potential for obtaining information during the management of patients with cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ol.2019.11047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6876337PMC
December 2019

Clinical usefulness of a deep learning-based system as the first screening on small-bowel capsule endoscopy reading.

Dig Endosc 2020 May 2;32(4):585-591. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Background And Aim: To examine whether our convolutional neural network (CNN) system based on deep learning can reduce the reading time of endoscopists without oversight of abnormalities in the capsule-endoscopy reading process.

Methods: Twenty videos of the entire small-bowel capsule endoscopy procedure were prepared, each of which included 0-5 lesions of small-bowel mucosal breaks (erosions or ulcerations). At another institute, two reading processes were compared: (A) endoscopist-alone readings and (B) endoscopist readings after the first screening by the proposed CNN. In process B, endoscopists read only images detected by CNN. Two experts and four trainees independently read 20 videos each (10 for process A and 10 for process B). Outcomes were reading time and detection rate of mucosal breaks by endoscopists. Gold standard was findings at the original institute by two experts.

Results: Mean reading time of small-bowel sections by endoscopists was significantly shorter during process B (expert, 3.1 min; trainee, 5.2 min) compared to process A (expert, 12.2 min; trainee, 20.7 min) (P < 0.001). For 37 mucosal breaks, detection rate by endoscopists did not significantly decrease in process B (expert, 87%; trainee, 55%) compared to process A (expert, 84%; trainee, 47%). Experts detected all eight large lesions (>5 mm), but trainees could not, even when supported by the CNN.

Conclusions: Our CNN-based system for capsule endoscopy videos reduced the reading time of endoscopists without decreasing the detection rate of mucosal breaks. However, the reading level of endoscopists should be considered when using the system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/den.13517DOI Listing
May 2020

Expression of circular RNA CDR1‑AS in colon cancer cells increases cell surface PD‑L1 protein levels.

Oncol Rep 2019 Oct 19;42(4):1459-1466. Epub 2019 Jul 19.

Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113‑8655, Japan.

The expression of CDR1‑AS, a representative circular RNA, is closely linked with poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancers, such as colon, liver, and pancreatic cancers. Although it is well known that CDR1‑AS antagonizes microRNA‑7 function through its sequence similarities in the brain, its biological function and link with the malignant potential of cancer cells remain unclear, partly due to the difficulties of ectopic expression of circular RNAs. In the present study, SW620, a colon cancer cell line that stably expresses CDR1‑AS RNA circularized, was established using the laccase 2 gene cassette, and its biological function associated with malignant behavior was determined. In contrast to previous studies, cell growth or invasion ability was not altered by CDR1‑AS expression. However, the expression levels of CMTM4 and CMTM6, which were recently recognized as critical regulators of PD‑L1 protein expression at the cell surface, were significantly increased. Accordingly, the cell surface PD‑L1 protein levels were increased in CDR1‑AS‑expressing cells. Notably, the effects were not canceled out by overexpressing microRNA‑7, indicating that the increase in cell surface PD‑L1 in CDR1‑AS‑expressing cells was not dependent on microRNA‑7 function. These results indicated that expression of this circular RNA in cancer cells may lead to poor prognosis by increasing cell surface PD‑L1 levels through microRNA‑7‑independent mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/or.2019.7244DOI Listing
October 2019

A new method for insertion of long intestinal tube for small bowel obstruction: Nonendoscopic over-the-wire method via short nasogastric tube.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2016 Nov;95(47):e5449

Department of Gastroenterology, JR Tokyo General Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

It is often difficult to insert a long intestinal tube (LT) in patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO). We developed a novel technique for inserting an LT without endoscopy called nonendoscopic over-the-wire method via short nasogastric tube (NEWSt). We evaluated the efficacy and safety of NEWSt.We performed a retrospective study of patients who underwent LT insertion for SBO without any indications of strangulation with either NEWSt (n = 16) or endoscopy (n = 17) between November 2011 and February 2015 at our hospital. Univariate analysis was used to assess the success rate of LT placement beyond the duodenojejunal flexure, time required for the procedure, clinical outcomes, and adverse events.The success rate was 100% in both groups. Procedure time was numerically, but not statistically, shorter in the NEWSt group compared with the endoscopy group (24 ± 13 vs 30 ± 13 min; P = 0.174). There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of surgery rate (31% vs 12%; P = 0.225), fasting period (11.3 ± 6.3 vs 9.9 ± 4.5 days; P = 0.482), hospital stay (26.4 ± 22.1 vs 18.7 ± 7.0 days; P = 0.194), and recurrence rate (19% vs 24%; P = 1.0). No serious adverse event was observed in the NEWSt group, whereas serious aspiration pneumonia was observed in 2 patients after LT insertion in the endoscopy group.Without endoscopy, NEWSt enabled the high success rate and the short procedure time for the LT insertion. Prospective, randomized controlled trials are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000005449DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5134882PMC
November 2016

The death effector domain-containing DEDD forms a complex with Akt and Hsp90, and supports their stability.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2010 Jan 30;391(4):1708-13. Epub 2009 Dec 30.

Division of Molecular Biomedicine for Pathogenesis, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

Insulin secretion and glucose transport are the major mechanisms to balance glucose homeostasis. Recently, we found that the death effector domain-containing DEDD inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (Cdk1) function, thereby preventing Cdk1-dependent inhibitory phosphorylation of S6 kinase-1 (S6K1), downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), which overall results in maintenance of S6K1 activity. Here we newly show that DEDD forms a complex with Akt and heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90), and supports the stability of both proteins. Hence, in DEDD(-/-) mice, Akt protein levels are diminished in skeletal muscles and adipose tissues, which interferes with the translocation of glucose-transporter 4 (GLUT4) upon insulin stimulation, leading to inefficient incorporation of glucose in these organs. Interestingly, as for the activation of S6K1, suppression of Cdk1 is involved in the stabilization of Akt protein by DEDD, since diminishment of Cdk1 in DEDD(-/-) cells via siRNA expression or treatment with a Cdk1-inhibitor, increases both Akt and Hsp90 protein levels. Such multifaceted involvement of DEDD in glucose homeostasis by supporting both insulin secretion (via maintenance of S6K1 activity) and glucose uptake (via stabilizing Akt protein), may suggest an association of DEDD-deficiency with the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2009.12.137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2833336PMC
January 2010
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