Publications by authors named "Narges Tajik"

7 Publications

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The Early Report of Herpetic Whitlow by Bahal-Dawlah Razi in 15th Century CE.

Infez Med 2020 Sep;28(3):450-452

Department of Traditional Pharmacy, School of Persian Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of History of Medicine, School of Persian Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

A herpetic whitlow is a lesion (whitlow) on a finger or thumb caused by herpes simplex virus. It is a painful infection that typically affects the fingers or thumbs. Occasionally infection occurs on the toes or on the nail cuticle. Symptoms of herpetic whitlow include tenderness, swelling and reddening of the infected finger skin, fever and swollen lymph nodes. Although, it is believed that the first recorded observations were in 1909 CE by H. G. Adamson, in the medieval period, Bah?' al-Dawlah N?rbakhsh? Razi (1501 CE) described herpetic whitlow, under the title of Dakhes in Khulasat al-Tajarib (The Summary of Experience), his book on medicine. Some of Baha al-Dawlah's descriptions and his etiology of Dakhes are based on humoral theories and cannot be concurred with current medical concepts, but more symptoms and clinical manifestations are consistent with current definitions. It seems the earliest description of herpetic whitlow in the medical history.
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September 2020

Targeting zonulin and intestinal epithelial barrier function to prevent onset of arthritis.

Nat Commun 2020 04 24;11(1):1995. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Department of Internal Medicine 3, Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.

Gut microbial dysbiosis is associated with the development of autoimmune disease, but the mechanisms by which microbial dysbiosis affects the transition from asymptomatic autoimmunity to inflammatory disease are incompletely characterized. Here, we identify intestinal barrier integrity as an important checkpoint in translating autoimmunity to inflammation. Zonulin family peptide (zonulin), a potent regulator for intestinal tight junctions, is highly expressed in autoimmune mice and humans and can be used to predict transition from autoimmunity to inflammatory arthritis. Increased serum zonulin levels are accompanied by a leaky intestinal barrier, dysbiosis and inflammation. Restoration of the intestinal barrier in the pre-phase of arthritis using butyrate or a cannabinoid type 1 receptor agonist inhibits the development of arthritis. Moreover, treatment with the zonulin antagonist larazotide acetate, which specifically increases intestinal barrier integrity, effectively reduces arthritis onset. These data identify a preventive approach for the onset of autoimmune disease by specifically targeting impaired intestinal barrier function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15831-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181728PMC
April 2020

Ethanol consumption inhibits T cell responses and the development of autoimmune arthritis.

Nat Commun 2020 04 24;11(1):1998. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Department of Internal Medicine 3, Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.

Alcohol consumption is a consistent protective factor for the development of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The underlying mechanism for this tolerance-inducing effect of alcohol, however, is unknown. Here we show that alcohol and its metabolite acetate alter the functional state of T follicular helper (T) cells in vitro and in vivo, thereby exerting immune regulatory and tolerance-inducing properties. Alcohol-exposed mice have reduced Bcl6 and PD-1 expression as well as IL-21 production by T cells, preventing proper spatial organization of T cells to form T:B cell conjugates in germinal centers. This effect is associated with impaired autoantibody formation, and mitigates experimental autoimmune arthritis. By contrast, T cell independent immune responses and passive models of arthritis are not affected by alcohol exposure. These data clarify the immune regulatory and tolerance-inducing effect of alcohol consumption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15855-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181688PMC
April 2020

The heart in embryology.

Eur Heart J 2018 Jan;39(3):191-192

Cardiology Department School of Medicine Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Isfahan, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehx771DOI Listing
January 2018

The potential effects of chlorogenic acid, the main phenolic components in coffee, on health: a comprehensive review of the literature.

Eur J Nutr 2017 Oct 8;56(7):2215-2244. Epub 2017 Apr 8.

Department of Internal Medicine VI: Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tuebingen, Frondsbergstr 23, 72076, Tuebingen, Germany.

Chlorogenic acid (CGA), an important biologically active dietary polyphenol, is produced by certain plant species and is a major component of coffee. Reduction in the risk of a variety of diseases following CGA consumption has been mentioned in recent basic and clinical research studies. This systematic review discusses in vivo animal and human studies of the physiological and biochemical effects of chlorogenic acids (CGAs) on biomarkers of chronic disease. We searched PubMed, Embase, Amed and Scopus using the following search terms: ("chlorogenic acid" OR "green coffee bean extract") AND (human OR animal) (last performed on April 1st, 2015) for relevant literature on the in vivo effects of CGAs in animal and human models, including clinical trials on cardiovascular, metabolic, cancerogenic, neurological and other functions. After exclusion of editorials and letters, uncontrolled observations, duplicate and not relevant publications the remaining 94 studies have been reviewed. The biological properties of CGA in addition to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects have recently been reported. It is postulated that CGA is able to exert pivotal roles on glucose and lipid metabolism regulation and on the related disorders, e.g. diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), obesity, cancer, and hepatic steatosis. The wide range of potential health benefits of CGA, including its anti-diabetic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity impacts, may provide a non-pharmacological and non-invasive approach for treatment or prevention of some chronic diseases. In this study, the effects of CGAs on different aspects of health by reviewing the related literatures have been discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1379-1DOI Listing
October 2017

Quercetin improves bone strength in experimental biliary cirrhosis.

Hepatol Res 2013 Apr 9;43(4):394-400. Epub 2012 Aug 9.

Department of Nutrition and Biochemistry, School of Public Health Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences Department of Histology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran Department of Nutrition and Biochemistry, The International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Kish, Iran.

Aim:   Metabolic bone disorders and reduced bone mass are common complications in patients with biliary cirrhosis. As a result of there being no clear etiology, no specific therapy has been established yet. Previous studies have reported that quercetin, a plant-derived flavonoid, might improve bone quality. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of quercetin on bone strength of biliary cirrhotic rats.

Methods:   Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 6-7 months were randomized into three groups of eight. One group served as control (sham operated), while the other two groups underwent a complete bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, serum bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were measured in animal blood samples to confirm the occurrence of cirrhosis in the BDL rats. Then, one of the BDL groups received placebo and the other one was injected once a day with 150 µmol/kg of quercetin for 4 weeks. At the end of the study, femora were removed and tested for bone strength and histomorphometric parameters. The serum levels of osteocalcin, C-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen, calcium and phosphorus were determined as bone turnover markers.

Results:   Femur breaking strength was dramatically lower in the BDL group compared with control. However, receiving quercetin could reverse the deteriorating effect of cirrhosis on bone strength of BDL rats. Quercetin could noticeably elevate osteocalcin as a bone formation marker.

Conclusion:   These data suggest that quercetin can significantly improve bone strength particularly due to increasing bone formation in biliary cirrhosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1872-034X.2012.01075.xDOI Listing
April 2013

Short-term effect of weight loss through restrictive bariatric surgery on serum levels of vaspin in morbidly obese subjects.

Eur Cytokine Netw 2011 Dec;22(4):181-6

Department of Nutrition and Biochemistry, School of Public Health and Institute of Public Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center (EMRC), Obesity and Food group set, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

The aims of this study were to evaluate the short-term effects of laparoscopic restrictive bariatric surgery (LRBS) on plasma levels of vaspin and the potential associations of changes in vaspin levels with changes in anthropometric indices, insulin-resistance and dietary intake. Thirty, severely obese subjects (21 female; mean age, 32.5 years) with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 44.1 ± 4.9 kg/m(2) underwent LRBS. Measurements of anthropometric indices, dietary intakes, physical activity and plasma vaspin concentrations were performed prior to, and six weeks after LRBS. Insulin-sensitivity was estimated using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin-resistance (HOMA-IR). Six weeks after LRBS, BMI decreased to a mean of 38.4 ± 4.9 kg/m(2). Significant reductions were also observed in waist circumference (WC), daily intakes of calorie, fat and protein, and plasma concentrations of triglyceride. No significant change was observed in fasting levels of insulin, blood sugar or HOMA-IR. Vaspin decreased significantly (0.26 ± 0.17 vs 0.36 ± 0.20, p=0.048) following surgery. While the percentage change of vaspin was not correlated with percent changes in anthropometric indices and HOMA-IR, it correlated positively with the percentage change in intake of calories, fat and protein: this correlation remained significant even after adjustment for sex and changes in WC and HOMA-IR. Our study suggests that LRBS decreases the serum vaspin concentrations in parallel with the restriction of dietary intake. Furthermore, decreased levels of vaspin early after LRBS seem more likely to result from decreased dietary intake rather than weight-loss-induced insulin sensitivity improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/ecn.2011.0295DOI Listing
December 2011