Publications by authors named "Nancy Matthew-Maich"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Managing multiple chronic conditions in the community: a Canadian qualitative study of the experiences of older adults, family caregivers and healthcare providers.

BMC Geriatr 2017 01 31;17(1):40. Epub 2017 Jan 31.

McMaster University, Main West Medical Group, 1685 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S 1G5, Canada.

Background: The prevalence of multiple chronic conditions (MCC) among older persons is increasing worldwide and is associated with poor health status and high rates of healthcare utilization and costs. Current health and social services are not addressing the complex needs of this group or their family caregivers. A better understanding of the experience of MCC from multiple perspectives is needed to improve the approach to care for this vulnerable group. However, the experience of MCC has not been explored with a broad sample of community-living older adults, family caregivers and healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of managing MCC in the community from the perspectives of older adults with MCC, family caregivers and healthcare providers working in a variety of settings.

Methods: Using Thorne's interpretive description approach, semi-structured interviews (n = 130) were conducted in two Canadian provinces with 41 community-living older adults (aged 65 years and older) with three or more chronic conditions, 47 family caregivers (aged 18 years and older), and 42 healthcare providers working in various community settings. Healthcare providers represented various disciplines and settings. Interview transcripts were analyzed using Thorne's interpretive description approach.

Results: Participants described the experience of managing MCC as: (a) overwhelming, draining and complicated, (b) organizing pills and appointments, (c) being split into pieces, (d) doing what the doctor says, (e) relying on family and friends, and (f) having difficulty getting outside help. These themes resonated with the emotional impact of MCC for all three groups of participants and the heavy reliance on family caregivers to support care in the home.

Conclusions: The experience of managing MCC in the community was one of high complexity, where there was a large gap between the needs of older adults and caregivers and the ability of health and social care systems to meet those needs. Healthcare for MCC was experienced as piecemeal and fragmented with little focus on the person and family as a whole. These findings provide a foundation for the design of care processes to more optimally address the needs-service gap that is integral to the experience of managing MCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017-0431-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5282921PMC
January 2017

Nursing students' perceptions of effective problem-based learning tutors.

Nurs Stand 2016 Nov;31(12):48-59

Department of Nursing, Mohawk College, Ontario, Canada.

Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of what makes an effective tutor in problem-based learning courses, and the influence of effective teaching on students' learning and experience. Method Students enrolled in all four years of a baccalaureate nursing programme completed online surveys (n=511) and participated in focus groups (n=19). Data were analysed and combined using content analysis. Findings The data were summarised using five themes, the '5 Ps' of effective teaching in problem-based learning. Nursing students perceived effective problem-based learning tutors to be prepared with knowledge and facilitation skills, person-centred, passionate, professional and able to prepare students for success in the nursing programme. Effective tutors adjusted their approaches to students throughout the four years of the nursing programme. Conclusion Effective teaching in problem-based learning is essential and has significant effects on nursing students' learning, motivation and experience. Important attributes, skills and strategies of effective problem-based learning tutors were identified and may be used to enhance teaching and plan professional development initiatives.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ns.2016.e10318DOI Listing
November 2016

The impact of curricular changes on BSCN students' clinical learning outcomes.

Nurse Educ Pract 2016 Nov 4;21:51-58. Epub 2016 Oct 4.

School of Nursing, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. Electronic address:

Ongoing curricular renewal is a necessary phenomenon in nursing education to align learning with ever-changing professional practice demands. The McMaster Mohawk Conestoga BScN Program in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada recently engaged in a comprehensive curriculum renewal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of curricular changes on students' deep learning. Faculty perceptions about student learning outcomes during final year clinical placements were gathered through a combination of individual interviews and focus groups using Interpretive Descriptive qualitative research methodology. Twenty five faculty members who supervised BScN students in clinical placements before and after curriculum renewal shared perceptions of changes in students' overall performance. The chosen clinical learning outcomes were: changes in students' performance related to person-centred care, clinical reasoning and judgment, pathophysiology, and evidence-informed decision-making. Faculty described three major themes in students' performance 1) pulling it all together, 2) seeing the whole person, and 3) finding their nursing voices. This reflected a shift to person-centred care, increasing professional confidence, and improved clinical reasoning and judgment and no changes to integrating pathophysiology or evidence-informed decision-making. In this study curriculum renewal provided an excellent starting point for the scholarship of teaching and learning within nursing education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2016.09.010DOI Listing
November 2016

Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating Mobile Health Technologies for Managing Chronic Conditions in Older Adults: A Scoping Review.

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2016 Jun 9;4(2):e29. Epub 2016 Jun 9.

Aging, Community & Health Research Unit, McMaster University, Mohawk College/McMaster University School of Nursing, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

Background: The current landscape of a rapidly aging population accompanied by multiple chronic conditions presents numerous challenges to optimally support the complex needs of this group. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have shown promise in supporting older persons to manage chronic conditions; however, there remains a dearth of evidence-informed guidance to develop such innovations.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to conduct a scoping review of current practices and recommendations for designing, implementing, and evaluating mHealth technologies to support the management of chronic conditions in community-dwelling older adults.

Methods: A 5-stage scoping review methodology was used to map the relevant literature published between January 2005 and March 2015 as follows: (1) identified the research question, (2) identified relevant studies, (3) selected relevant studies for review, (4) charted data from selected literature, and (5) summarized and reported results. Electronic searches were conducted in 5 databases. In addition, hand searches of reference lists and a key journal were completed. Inclusion criteria were research and nonresearch papers focused on mHealth technologies designed for use by community-living older adults with at least one chronic condition, or health care providers or informal caregivers providing care in the home and community setting. Two reviewers independently identified articles for review and extracted data.

Results: We identified 42 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, described innovations focused on older adults with specific chronic conditions (n=17), chronic conditions in general (n=6), or older adults in general or those receiving homecare services (n=18). Most of the mHealth solutions described were designed for use by both patients and health care providers or health care providers only. Thematic categories identified included the following: (1) practices and considerations when designing mHealth technologies; (2) factors that support/hinder feasibility, acceptability, and usability of mHealth technologies; and (3) approaches or methods for evaluating mHealth technologies.

Conclusions: There is limited yet increasing use of mHealth technologies in home health care for older adults. A user-centered, collaborative, interdisciplinary approach to enhance feasibility, acceptability, and usability of mHealth innovations is imperative. Creating teams with the required pools of expertise and insight regarding needs is critical. The cyclical, iterative process of developing mHealth innovations needs to be viewed as a whole with supportive theoretical frameworks. Many barriers to implementation and sustainability have limited the number of successful, evidence-based mHealth solutions beyond the pilot or feasibility stage. The science of implementation of mHealth technologies in home-based care for older adults and self-management of chronic conditions are important areas for further research. Additionally, changing needs as cohorts and technologies advance are important considerations. Lessons learned from the data and important implications for practice, policy, and research are discussed to inform the future development of innovations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.5127DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4919548PMC
June 2016

The effect of nursing staff on student learning in the clinical setting.

Nurs Stand 2016 Jun;30(40):40-7

Mohawk College, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives of the influence of nursing staff on their learning and experience in the clinical setting. Method A qualitative description approach was used. Thirty nursing students were interviewed individually or in focus groups. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four researchers analysed the data separately and agreed on the themes. Findings Nursing staff had positive (enabling) and negative (hindering) effects on students' clinical learning and socialisation to nursing. Nursing staff may encourage and excite students when they behave as positive mentors, facilitators and motivators. However, their actions may also have a negative effect on students, decreasing their confidence, learning and desire to continue in the profession. Conclusion Nursing staff influence student learning. Their actions, attitude and willingness to teach are influential factors. The findings have implications for patient safety, nurse retention and recruitment, and preparing students for professional practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ns.30.40.40.s44DOI Listing
June 2016

Student perceptions of effective nurse educators in clinical practice.

Nurs Stand 2015 Apr;29(34):45-58

Department of Nursing, Mohawk College.

Aim: To explore baccalaureate nursing student perceptions of what makes an effective nurse educator in the clinical practice setting and the influence of effective teaching on student experiences.

Method: Online surveys (n=511) and focus groups (n=7) were completed by nursing students enrolled in all four years of the baccalaureate programme. Data were analysed using content analysis.

Findings: Participants indicated that effective teachers foster positive experiences, motivation, meaningful learning and success. They were perceived to be prepared, person-centred, professional, passionate and positive, and to prepare students for success using active strategies. They adjusted to meet individual students' needs at each level of the programme.

Conclusion: Important characteristics and factors in effective clinical teaching were identified. These may be used to develop effective clinical teaching initiatives.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ns.29.34.45.e9640DOI Listing
April 2015

Leading on the frontlines with passion and persistence: a necessary condition for Breastfeeding Best Practice Guideline uptake.

J Clin Nurs 2013 Jun 27;22(11-12):1759-70. Epub 2012 Nov 27.

School of Nursing and Health Sciences Research & Innovation, Mohawk College, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

Aims And Objectives: The research question explored was what are the processes and strategies used by frontline leaders to support the uptake of the Breastfeeding Best Practice Guideline by nurses in maternity care practice settings?

Background: Best Practice Guidelines have been shown to enhance client care and outcomes. Leadership is known to have a key role in moving Best Practice Guidelines into nursing practice yet how this happens is poorly understood. This insight is needed to consistently and efficiently facilitate Best Practice Guideline uptake into clinical practice.

Design: Constructivist grounded theory was used to explore the social processes and strategies involved in facilitating Best Practice Guideline uptake.

Methods: Purposive, criterion-based, theoretical and negative case sampling were used recruiting 58 health professionals and 54 clients. Triangulation and constant comparison of data sources and types (interviews, documents and field notes) were used for analysis and rigour.

Results: Passionate, persistent, respected frontline leaders using tailored, multifaceted strategies aimed at three groups of nurse adopters effectively support the uptake of the Breastfeeding Best Practice Guideline in nursing practice. Successful uptake strategies used by frontline leaders that are new or underdeveloped in the previous literature are presented.

Conclusions: The study findings illuminated multidimensional, tailored strategies that frontline leaders use to facilitate the uptake of Best Practice Guidelines. Attention to individual attitudes and beliefs, as well as organisational, interorganisational and interprofessional partnerships are vital to uptake. Organisations that aspire to foster Best Practice Guideline uptake must invest in frontline leaders to 'make it happen' and sustain Best Practice Guideline uptake in practice.

Relevance To Clinical Practice: Understanding how frontline leaders facilitate Best Practice Guideline uptake is essential to selecting, educating and supporting them to foster desired practice changes. Strategies are explicated that frontline leaders can adopt and tailor to their own practice contexts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.12027DOI Listing
June 2013

Supporting the Uptake of Nursing Guidelines: what you really need to know to move nursing guidelines into practice.

Worldviews Evid Based Nurs 2013 May 25;10(2):104-15. Epub 2012 Jun 25.

School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Mohawk College, McMaster-Mohawk Institute for Applied Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

Background: There is a current push to use best practice guidelines (BPGs) in health care to enhance client care and outcomes. Even though intensive resources have been invested internationally to develop BPGs, a gap in knowledge exists about how to consistently and efficiently move them into practice.

Methods: Constructivist grounded theory was used to explore the complex processes of a breastfeeding BPG implementation and uptake in three acute care hospitals. Interviews (n = 120) with 112 participants representing clients, nurses, lactation consultants, midwives, physicians, managers, administrators, and nurse educators as well as document and field note analysis informed this study. Data were analyzed using constant comparison and coding steps outlined by Charmaz: initial coding, selective (focused) coding, then theoretical coding. Triangulation of data types and sources were used as well as theoretical sampling. Data were collected from 2009 to 2010.

Results: Two sites showed BPG uptake while one did not. Factors present in the uptake sites included, ongoing passionate frontline leaders, the use of multifaceted strategies, and processes that occurred at organizational, leadership, individual and social levels. Particularly noteworthy was the transformation of individual nurses to believing in and using the BPG. Impacts occurred at client, nurse, unit, inter-professional, organizational and system levels.

Conclusions: A conceptual framework: Supporting the Uptake of Nursing Guidelines, was developed that reveals essential processes used to facilitate BPG uptake into nursing practice and a process of nurse transformation to believing in and using the BPG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-6787.2012.00259.xDOI Listing
May 2013

Considering the qualitative-quantitative language divide.

Qual Health Res 2011 Sep 7;21(9):1302-3. Epub 2010 Dec 7.

College of Nursing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-5880, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049732310392386DOI Listing
September 2011

A comprehensive faculty development model for nursing education.

J Prof Nurs 2010 May-Jun;26(3):152-61

School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Professional nursing education has undergone profound legislative changes requiring a university baccalaureate in nursing as entry to practice as a registered nurse (RN) in Ontario, Canada. Subsequent partnerships between colleges and universities were mandated by the ministry of post secondary education in order to maximize existing resources, such as faculty, and capitalize on the strenghts of both sectors. Faculty, in partnered collaborative undergraduate nursing programs, are challenged by the ever-evolving transition in conceptualization, development, and delivery of nursing education; consequently, the design, dissemination, and evaluation of effective faculty development programs is of paramount importance (Steinert, 2000). This paper focuses on the creation of the Comprehensive Faculty Development Model implemented by a collaborative BScN program partnership in south-western Ontario. It describes the model's contextual underpinnings, illustrates the component parts, explains their relationship, and provides an in-depth discussion of foundational concepts. The model was developed under the auspices of a collaborative faculty development committee with representation from all partners. Summaries of four research studies designed and implemented by members of the partnership provide a useful assessment of how faculty members experienced the inaugural BScN program; however, more study is needed in order to understand what approaches to faculty development are most effective and sustainable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.profnurs.2009.04.004DOI Listing
August 2010

Transformative learning and research utilization in nursing practice: a missing link?

Worldviews Evid Based Nurs 2010 Mar 5;7(1):25-35. Epub 2009 Oct 5.

School of Nursing, Mohawk College, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Poor or inconsistent research utilization into clinical practice is a recurrent theme across study contexts, rendering leaders disillusioned with how best to foster the uptake of research into nursing practice. This makes it imperative to look to new approaches. Research utilization involves a learning process engaging attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors; yet, this is often overlooked in approaches and models used to facilitate research use. This oversight may offer some explanation to the limited progress in research utilization to date. Transformation Theory offers an explanatory theory and specific strategies (critical reflection and critical discourse) to explore attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors so that they are understood, validated, and can better guide actions.

Aim: The purpose of this article was to explore what Transformation Theory can contribute to research utilization initiatives in nursing practice.

Approach: Transformation Theory and transformative learning strategies are discussed and critically analyzed in consideration of their potential roles in fostering research utilization in clinical nursing practice.

Issues And Conclusions: (1) Research utilization is a learning process that involves knowledge, skills, feelings, attitudes, and beliefs. (2) Transformative learning strategies of critical reflection and discourse can facilitate insight into experiences, finding shared meanings among groups of people, and understanding/validating beliefs, attitudes, and feelings so they can more consciously guide future actions. This dimension is frequently neglected in research utilization efforts. (3) In combination with research utilization theories, Transformation Theory may be a missing link to make research utilization initiatives more effective in rendering and sustaining nursing practice change, thus enhancing client care and well-being. (4) Research and further consideration are both warranted and needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-6787.2009.00172.xDOI Listing
March 2010

Engaging nursing preceptor-student dyads in an evidence-based approach to professional practice.

Evid Based Nurs 2007 Apr;10(2):36-40

McMaster University, School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ebn.10.2.36DOI Listing
April 2007

Evolving as nurse educators in problem-based learning through a community of faculty development.

J Prof Nurs 2007 Mar-Apr;23(2):75-82

Mohawk College, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 1C7.

Effective faculty development programs are of paramount importance in this era of profound change in nursing education driven by baccalaureate-degree entry to practice and the concurrent implementation of college/university collaborative partnerships in Ontario, Canada. The overall purpose of this study was to design, disseminate, and evaluate a faculty development program involving nursing faculty from the McMaster University, Mohawk College, and Conestoga College. In keeping with selected conceptual models and responses to a needs assessment, faculty participated in a collaborative faculty development program that included a planned workshop, a mentorship program, and regular faculty development activities. This article presents the qualitative program evaluation component that included focus group discussions and subsequent content analysis to gain an understanding of the experiences and meaning of the faculty who participated in the faculty development program. The overarching theme was that the faculty experienced a sense of evolving as nurse educators in problem-based learning (PBL) through a community of faculty development. The following themes emerged: becoming certain in the midst of uncertainty; developing collegial trust and community; embracing PBL; valuing faculty development; and evolving as a nurse educator in PBL through faculty development. The results attest to the benefits of a collaborative faculty development program, guide future faculty development, and promote mastery in PBL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.profnurs.2006.07.004DOI Listing
May 2007
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