Publications by authors named "Najmolhoda Aryan"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of expertise in shooting and Taekwondo on bipedal and unipedal postural control isolated or concurrent with a reaction-time task.

Gait Posture 2013 Jun 11;38(2):226-30. Epub 2012 Dec 11.

Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

It was hypothesized that training in 'static balance' or 'dynamic balance' sports has differential effects on postural control and its attention demands during quiet standing. In order to test this hypothesis, two groups of female athletes practicing shooting, as a 'static balance' sport, and Taekwondo, as a 'dynamic balance' sport, and a control group of non-physically active females voluntarily participated in this study. Postural control was assessed during bipedal and unipedal stance with and without performing a Go/No-go reaction time task. Visual and/or support surface conditions were manipulated in bipedal and unipedal stances in order to modify postural difficulty. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of dual tasking on postural and cognitive performance. Similar pattern of results were found in bipedal and unipedal stances, with Taekwondo practitioners displaying larger sway, shooters displaying lower sway and non-athletes displaying sway characteristics intermediate to Taekwondo and shooting athletes. Larger effect was found in bipedal stance. Single to dual-task comparison of postural control showed no significant effect of mental task on sway velocity in shooters, indicating less cognitive effort invested in balance control during bipedal stance. We suggest that expertise in shooting has a more pronounced effect on decreased sway in static balance conditions. Furthermore, shooters invest less attention in postures that are more specific to their training, i.e. bipedal stance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.11.016DOI Listing
June 2013

Persian translation and validation of the Kujala Patellofemoral Scale in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

Disabil Rehabil 2012 27;34(26):2259-63. Epub 2012 May 27.

Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Purpose: To culturally translate and validate the Persian version of Kujala Patellofemoral Scale (KPS) and evaluate the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, construct validity and ceiling or floor effects of this instrument in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS).

Method: After standard forward and backward translations, 100 patients with PFPS completed the Persian versions of the KPS and Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) in the first visit. With time interval of 2-3 days after the first visit, 47 patients filled out the KPS in the second visit. Test-retest reliability and internal consistency were assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC(2,1)) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) and Cronbach's α coefficient, respectively. The Spearman's rank correlation (r(s)) was used to assess the correlations between the Persian KPS and SF-36 subscales.

Results: The acceptable level of ICC >0.70 (ICC = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93-0.98) and Cronbach's α coefficient >0.70 (α = 0.81) was obtained for the Persian KPS. There were low to moderate correlations (r(s) = 0.25-0.60, p < .01) between the Persian KPS and Persian SF-36 subscales of mental and physical health components. However, correlations between the Persian KPS and SF-36 physical components were higher than correlations between the Persian KPS and SF-36 mental components. No ceiling and floor effects were seen for the Persian KPS.

Conclusions: The Persian version of KPS is a reliable and valid outcome measure of disability and seems to be a suitable instrument for use in clinical practice of Iranian patients with chronic PFPS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2012.683480DOI Listing
December 2012