Publications by authors named "Naffaa Al Harbi"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hyperglycemia and Hypoinsulinemia in Patients with Fanconi-Bickel Syndrome.

J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2020 Oct 22;21(6):581-586. Epub 2020 Oct 22.

Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre,Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Fanconi-Bickel syndrome (FBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the combination of hepatorenal glycogen accumulation and Fanconi-type nephropathy. Mutations in GLUT2, the gene for facilitative glucose transporter protein 2 (GLUT2), cause FBS.

Aim: To evaluate glucose and insulin responses to oral glucose load in patients with FBS.

Methods: Ten children (7.3 ± 4.8 years) diagnosed with FBS in early infancy underwent a standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); plasma glucose (PG) and serum insulin concentrations were measured at 30-min intervals for 2 hours. HbAtc, insulin-like growth factor-1, and fasting lipid profiles were also measured.

Results: Mean fasting and 2-h PG concentrations were 3.8 ± 0.9 mmoVI and 8.6 ± 3.0 mmol/1, respectively. 2-hour PG levels were above 11.1 mmolll in two patients (20%) and between 7.75 and 11.1 mmoVI in four patients (40%). HbAtc was normal in all the patients with a mean of 5.4 ± 0.3%. Mean fasting and peak serum insulin levels were 8. 7 ± 0.8 pmol/1 and 98.6 ± 43.0 pmoVI, respectively, and did not differ between / the patients with normal and abnormal OGTT. , Patients with abnormal OGTT were younger ( 4.8 ± 3.2 vs 11.0 ± 4.8 yr; p = 0.04). Fasting PG increased with age (r = 0.80, p <0.01). Total and LDL cholesterol as well as triglyceride concentrations were elevated.

Conclusions: Most but not all patients with FBS have impaired glucose tolerance/diabetes range hyperglycemia after OGTT while maintaining normal HbAtc· Patients with FBS are relatively hypoinsulinemic. Both fasting hypoglycemia and post-OGTT hyperglycemia seem to improve with age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2008-210612DOI Listing
October 2020

Exploiting the Autozygome to Support Previously Published Mendelian Gene-Disease Associations: An Update.

Front Genet 2020 31;11:580484. Epub 2020 Dec 31.

Department of Genetics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

There is a growing interest in standardizing gene-disease associations for the purpose of facilitating the proper classification of variants in the context of Mendelian diseases. One key line of evidence is the independent observation of pathogenic variants in unrelated individuals with similar phenotypes. Here, we expand on our previous effort to exploit the power of autozygosity to produce homozygous pathogenic variants that are otherwise very difficult to encounter in the homozygous state due to their rarity. The identification of such variants in genes with only tentative associations to Mendelian diseases can add to the existing evidence when observed in the context of compatible phenotypes. In this study, we report 20 homozygous variants in 18 genes (, and ) that satisfy the ACMG classification for pathogenic/likely pathogenic if the involved genes had confirmed rather than tentative links to diseases. These variants were selected because they were truncating, founder with compelling segregation or supported by robust functional assays as with the variant that we present its validation using yeast model. Our findings support the previously reported disease associations for these genes and represent a step toward their confirmation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2020.580484DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7806527PMC
December 2020

Functional alterations due to amino acid changes and evolutionary comparative analysis of ARPKD and ADPKD genes.

Genom Data 2016 Dec 3;10:127-134. Epub 2016 Nov 3.

King Salman Armed Forces Hospital, P.O. box 100, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.

A targeted customized sequencing of genes implicated in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) phenotype was performed to identify candidate variants using the Ion torrent PGM next-generation sequencing. The results identified four potential pathogenic variants in gene [c.4870C > T, p.(Arg1624Trp), c.5725C > T, p.(Arg1909Trp), c.1736C > T, p.(Thr579Met) and c.10628T > G, p.(Leu3543Trp)] among 12 out of 18 samples. However, one variant c.4870C > T, p.(Arg1624Trp) was common among eight patients. Some patient samples also showed few variants in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) disease causing genes and such as c.12433G > A, p.(Val4145Ile) and c.1445T > G, p.(Phe482Cys), respectively. All causative variants were validated by capillary sequencing and confirmed the presence of a novel homozygous variant c.10628T > G, p.(Leu3543Trp) in a male proband. We have recently published the results of these studies (Edrees et al., 2016). Here we report for the first time the effect of the common mutation p.(Arg1624Trp) found in eight samples on the protein structure and function due to the specific amino acid changes of PKHD1 protein using molecular dynamics simulations. The computational approaches provide tool predict the phenotypic effect of variant on the structure and function of the altered protein. The structural analysis with the common mutation p.(Arg1624Trp) in the native and mutant modeled protein were also studied for solvent accessibility, secondary structure and stabilizing residues to find out the stability of the protein between wild type and mutant forms. Furthermore, comparative genomics and evolutionary analyses of variants observed in , , and genes were also performed in some mammalian species including human to understand the complexity of genomes among closely related mammalian species. Taken together, the results revealed that the evolutionary comparative analyses and characterization of , , and genes among various related and unrelated mammalian species will provide important insights into their evolutionary process and understanding for further disease characterization and management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gdata.2016.10.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5099264PMC
December 2016

Next-generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

Gene 2016 Oct 9;591(1):214-226. Epub 2016 Jul 9.

Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, P.O. Box 715, Makkah 21955, Saudi Arabia; Science and Technology Unit, Umm Al -Qura University, P.O. Box 715, Makkah 21955, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address:

Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) a rare genetic disorder, described by formation of cysts in the kidney. A targeted customized sequencing of genes implicated in ARPKD phenotype was performed to identify candidate variants using the Ion torrent PGM next-generation sequencing. The results identified likely pathogenic disease causing variants during the validation process. Four potential pathogenic variants [c.4870C>T, p.(Arg1624Trp)], [c.5725C>T, p.(Arg1909Trp)], c.1736C>T, p.(Thr579Met)] and [(c.10628T>G), p.(Leu3543Trp)] were observed in PKHD1 gene among 12 out of 18 samples. The rest of the patient samples also showed few variants in ADPKD (Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease) disease causing genes PKD1 and PKD2 i.e. [c.12433G>A, p.(Val4145Ile)] and [c.1445T>G, p.(Phe482Cys)], respectively. All causative variants were validated by capillary sequencing, confirming the presence of a novel homozygous variants [c.10628T>G, p.(Leu3543Trp)] found in exon 61 of a male proband. All potentially deleterious variants identified in PKHD1, PKD1, and PKD2 gene, also exhibited pathologically or clinically significance based on the computational predictions involved in predicting the impact of non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on protein function such as Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) and Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen2). SIFT classified 50% of our nsSNPs as "deleterious", while PolyPhen2 identified 45% of our nsSNPs as "Probably damaged" and the results from both programs were largely complementary. Taken together, these results suggest that the NGS strategies provide a fast, accurate and cost-effective molecular diagnostic tool for identifying mutations in targeted genes sequence analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2016.07.021DOI Listing
October 2016

A molecular genetic analysis of childhood nephrotic syndrome in a cohort of Saudi Arabian families.

J Hum Genet 2013 Jul 18;58(7):480-9. Epub 2013 Apr 18.

Department of Genetics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a renal disease characterized by heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, edema and hyperlipidemia. Its presentation within the first 3 months of life or in multiple family members suggests an underlying inherited cause. To determine the frequency of inherited NS, 62 cases (representing 49 families with NS) from Saudi Arabia were screened for mutations in NPHS1, NPHS2, LAMB2, PLCE1, CD2AP, MYO1E, WT1, PTPRO and Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1). We detected likely causative mutations in 25 out of 49 families studied (51%). We found that the most common genetic cause of NS in our cohort was a homozygous mutation in the NPHS2 gene, found in 11 of the 49 families (22%). Mutations in the NPHS1 and PLCE1 genes allowed a molecular genetic diagnosis in 12% and 8% of families, respectively. We detected novel MYO1E mutations in three families (6%). No mutations were found in WT1, PTPRO or NEIL1. The pathogenicity of novel variants was analyzed by in silico tests and by genetic screening of ethnically matched control populations. This is the first report describing the molecular genetics of NS in the Arabian Peninsula.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jhg.2013.27DOI Listing
July 2013

Hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia in patients with Fanconi-Bickel syndrome.

J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2008 Jun;21(6):581-6

Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Unlabelled: Fanconi-Bickel syndrome (FBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the combination of hepatorenal glycogen accumulation and Fanconi-type nephropathy. Mutations in GLUT2, the gene for facilitative glucose transporter protein 2 (GLUT2), cause FBS.

Aim: To evaluate glucose and insulin responses to oral glucose load in patients with FBS.

Methods: Ten children (7.3 +/- 4.8 years) diagnosed with FBS in early infancy underwent a standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); plasma glucose (PG) and serum insulin concentrations were measured at 30-min intervals for 2 hours. HbA1c, insulin-like growth factor-I, and fasting lipid profiles were also measured.

Results: Mean fasting and 2-h PG concentrations were 3.8 +/- 0.9 mmol/l and 8.6 +/- 3.0 mmol/1, respectively. 2-hour PG levels were above 11.1 mmol/l in two patients (20%) and between 7.75 and 11.1 mmol/ in four patients (40%). HbA1c was normal in all the patients with a mean of 5.4 +/- 0.3%. Mean fasting and peak serum insulin levels were 8.7 +/- 0.8 pmol/ and 98.6 +/- 43.0 pmol/l, respectively, and did not differ between the patients with normal and abnormal OGTT. Patients with abnormal OGTT were younger (4.8 +/- 3.2 vs 11.0 +/- 4.8 yr; p = 0.04). Fasting PG increased with age (r = 0.80, p < 0.01). Total and LDL cholesterol as well as triglyceride concentrations were elevated.

Conclusions: Most but not all patients with FBS have impaired glucose tolerance/diabetes range hyperglycemia after OGTT while maintaining normal HbA1c. Patients with FBS are relatively hypoinsulinemic. Both fasting hypoglycemia and post-OGTT hyperglycemia seem to improve with age.
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June 2008

Arthrogryposis, renal tubular acidosis and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome: two new cases and review.

Clin Dysmorphol 2005 Oct;14(4):191-6

Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre-Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ARC syndrome, the association of arthrogryposis, renal tubular dysfunction and cholestasis, is a rare genetic disorder. We report two Saudi infants from two different families with ARC syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of one of the infants showed lissencephaly, a previously unreported finding in this syndrome. We also review 39 ARC cases reported in the literature using the Medline database from January 1966 to September 2004.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00019605-200510000-00005DOI Listing
October 2005

Congenital insensitivity to pain in four related Saudi families.

Pediatr Dermatol 2002 Jul-Aug;19(4):333-5

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Asir Central Hospital, and Department of Pediatrics, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia.

Congenital insensitivity to pain (hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy [HSAN] type V) is a rare disorder of pain perception in which pain sensation is absent from birth, with no other neurologic deficits. We report five Saudi patients (three male and two female) age 10 months to 23 years who lacked pain sensation from birth but have normal appreciation of other sensory modalities. They are from four related families who are descended from one grandfather. The patients had sustained many painless injuries resulting in fractures and disfigurement, but otherwise are completely normal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1525-1470.2002.00095.xDOI Listing
November 2002