Publications by authors named "Nadine Cameron"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

How Residential Care Staff Conceptualize the Identities of Residents With Dementia and Its Relevance for Decision Making.

J Appl Gerontol 2020 Sep 1:733464820951734. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

The ways in which residential aged care staff conceptualize the identities of residents with dementia has significance for how they support them to make decisions and make decisions on their behalf. This article aims to further understand how staff in residential aged care facilities comprehend who residents "are."

Methods: This qualitative study draws on individual and group interview data with aged care staff from two Australian states concerning decision making for individuals with dementia. It identifies themes relevant to how staff refer to identity in relation to such residents.

Results: Staff possess disparate ideas about what things comprise residents' identities and, accordingly, which sources of knowledge are most relevant to learning about residents.

Discussion: This article argues for the application of a multidimensional and temporally inclusive understanding of identity by those who provide care to people with dementia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0733464820951734DOI Listing
September 2020

Challenges faced by residential aged care staff in decision-making for residents with dementia.

Dementia (London) 2020 Jun 14:1471301220929154. Epub 2020 Jun 14.

Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care, La Trobe University, Australia.

Care staff in residential aged care facilities (nursing homes) in Australia are obligated, under the Australian National Framework for Action on Dementia 2015-2019, to support residents to exercise choice and make decisions. Research indicates, however, that care staff are often given little guidance regarding which residents' decisions should be supported or how to make decisions on their behalf. This lack of guidance can result in a denial of residents' rights and inconsistent treatment by staff, placing residents' wellbeing at risk. Through providing an analysis of the responses of staff at RACFs in Victoria and Queensland to two case scenarios, this study seeks to provide some understanding of the difficulties staff face in supporting residents' self-determination and their own need for greater organisational support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1471301220929154DOI Listing
June 2020

Indigenous Children and Young People in Residential Care: A Systematic Scoping Review.

Trauma Violence Abuse 2019 Oct 30:1524838019881707. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

Gnibi College, Southern Cross University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

In Australia and internationally, Indigenous children are seriously overrepresented in the child welfare system. This article provides an overview of literature investigating the needs of Indigenous children in residential care facilities. The provision of culturally safe and trauma-informed therapeutic care to Indigenous children and young people in residential care recognizes that the trauma and violence that they have experienced is exacerbated by their Indigeneity due to the colonial histories presenting. Utilizing a systematic scoping review methodology, the study returned a total of 637 peer-reviewed articles that were identified and reviewed for inclusion. The process of exclusion resulted in the inclusion of eight peer-reviewed studies and 51 reports and discussion papers sourced from gray literature. Findings from this study, though dearth, indicate that trauma-informed and culturally safe interventions play a significant role in Indigenous children's health and well-being while in care. Their experiences of abuse and neglect transcend individual trauma and include intergenerational pain and suffering resulting from long-lasting impacts of colonization, displacement from culture and country, genocidal policies, racism, and the overall systemic disadvantage. As such, a therapeutic response, embedded within Indigenous cultural frameworks and knowledges of trauma, is not only important but absolutely necessary and aims to acknowledge the intersectionality between the needs of Indigenous children in care and the complex systemic disadvantage impacting them.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1524838019881707DOI Listing
October 2019

How do care staff in residential aged care facilities conceptualise their non-verbal interactions with residents with dementia and what relevance has this for how residents' preferences and capacity for decision-making are understood?

Dementia (London) 2020 Jul 6;19(5):1364-1380. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of General Practice, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

This paper considers the significance of how staff in residential aged care facilities interpret the non-verbal communication and behaviour of residents vis-a-vis their assessments of residents' preferences and ability to participate in decision-making. It highlights the risks associated with staff members' failure to interpret residents' non-verbal communication and behaviour with reference to residents' backgrounds and prior experiences. It also considers how non-verbal communication implemented by staff may impact residents' emotional state and, as a consequence, decision-making abilities. Drawing on interview data with aged care staff from Queensland and Victoria, it demonstrates that care staff in residential facilities appear to rely heavily on non-verbal signals in assessing the decision-making capacity and preferences of residents with dementia. It also indicates that many staff fail to consider residents' non-verbal communication and behaviour with due consideration of residents' individual histories.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1471301218798422DOI Listing
July 2020

Identifying conceptualizations and theories of change embedded in interventions to facilitate community participation for people with intellectual disability: A scoping review.

J Appl Res Intellect Disabil 2018 Mar 11;31(2):165-180. Epub 2017 Aug 11.

Living with Disability Research Centre, LaTrobe University, Bundoora, Vic., Australia.

Background: Little progress has been made towards community participation of people with intellectual disability despite it being a policy aim since the 1980s. We aimed to identify the features of programmes designed to support community participation.

Method: A scoping review was conducted of peer-reviewed literature between 2000 and 2015, about interventions to support community participation for adults with intellectual disability.

Results: A small body of evidence relates to the design and effectiveness of interventions to enhance community participation. Seventeen studies reported programmes reflecting three conceptualizations of community participation (as social relationships, as convivial encounter and as belonging) that used strategies such as active mentoring, facilitative support worker practice and arts-based programmes.

Conclusions: Studies showed the diverse and person-centred nature of community participation and demonstrated the need for larger-scale studies of promising interventions that include details of costs, and strategies to guide implementation of policies to support community participation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12390DOI Listing
March 2018