Publications by authors named "Nadine Boudreau"

10 Publications

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GCC Consolidated Feedback to ICH on the 2019 ICH M10 Bioanalytical Method Validation Draft Guideline.

Bioanalysis 2019 Sep 30;11(18s):1-228. Epub 2019 Sep 30.

WuXi Apptec, Shanghai, China.

The 13 GCC Closed Forum for Bioanalysis was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA on April 5, 2019. This GCC meeting was organized to discuss the contents of the 2019 ICH M10 Bioanalytical Method Validation Draft Guideline published in February 2019 and consolidate the feedback of the GCC members. In attendance were 63 senior-level participants from eight countries representing 44 bioanalytical CRO companies/sites. This event represented a unique opportunity for CRO bioanalytical experts to share their opinions and concerns regarding the ICH M10 Bioanalytical Method Validation Draft Guideline and to build unified comments to be provided to the ICH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2019-0207DOI Listing
September 2019

11th GCC Closed Forum: cumulative stability; matrix stability; immunogenicity assays; laboratory manuals; biosimilars; chiral methods; hybrid LBA/LCMS assays; fit-for-purpose validation; China Food and Drug Administration bioanalytical method validation.

Bioanalysis 2018 Apr 27;10(7):433-444. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Worldwide Clinical Trials, Austin, TX, USA.

The 11th Global CRO Council Closed Forum was held in Universal City, CA, USA on 3 April 2017. Representatives from international CRO members offering bioanalytical services were in attendance in order to discuss scientific and regulatory issues specific to bioanalysis. The second CRO-Pharma Scientific Interchange Meeting was held on 7 April 2017, which included Pharma representatives' sharing perspectives on the topics discussed earlier in the week with the CRO members. The issues discussed at the meetings included cumulative stability evaluations, matrix stability evaluations, the 2016 US FDA Immunogenicity Guidance and recent and unexpected FDA Form 483s on immunogenicity assays, the bioanalytical laboratory's role in writing PK sample collection instructions, biosimilars, CRO perspectives on the use of chiral versus achiral methods, hybrid LBA/LCMS assays, applications of fit-for-purpose validation and, at the Global CRO Council Closed Forum only, the status and trend of current regulated bioanalytical practice in China under CFDA's new BMV policy. Conclusions from discussions of these topics at both meetings are included in this report.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2018-0014DOI Listing
April 2018

The 10th GCC Closed Forum: rejected data, GCP in bioanalysis, extract stability, BAV, processed batch acceptance, matrix stability, critical reagents, ELN and data integrity and counteracting fraud.

Bioanalysis 2017 Apr 24;9(7):505-516. Epub 2017 Mar 24.

WuXi Apptec, Plainsboro, NJ, USA.

The 10th Global CRO Council (GCC) Closed Forum was held in Orlando, FL, USA on 18 April 2016. In attendance were decision makers from international CRO member companies offering bioanalytical services. The objective of this meeting was for GCC members to meet and discuss scientific and regulatory issues specific to bioanalysis. The issues discussed at this closed forum included reporting data from failed method validation runs, GCP for clinical sample bioanalysis, extracted sample stability, biomarker assay validation, processed batch acceptance criteria, electronic laboratory notebooks and data integrity, Health Canada's Notice regarding replicates in matrix stability evaluations, critical reagents and regulatory approaches to counteract fraud. In order to obtain the pharma perspectives on some of these topics, the first joint CRO-Pharma Scientific Interchange Meeting was held on 12 November 2016, in Denver, Colorado, USA. The five topics discussed at this Interchange meeting were reporting data from failed method validation runs, GCP for clinical sample bioanalysis, extracted sample stability, processed batch acceptance criteria and electronic laboratory notebooks and data integrity. The conclusions from the discussions of these topics at both meetings are included in this report.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2017-5000DOI Listing
April 2017

Importance of measuring testosterone in enzyme-inhibited plasma for oral testosterone undecanoate androgen replacement therapy clinical trials.

Future Sci OA 2015 Nov 1;1(4):FSO55. Epub 2015 Nov 1.

inVentiv Health clinical, Québec, Canada; inVentiv Health clinical, Québec, Canada.

Aim: Testosterone undecanoate (TU) is metabolized by nonspecific esterases in blood to testosterone (T). Typical clinical practice has been to analyze testosterone in human serum. The degradation of TU to testosterone was evaluated in conditions typically used in clinical studies.

Methods & Results: Freshly collected whole blood was fortified with TU at known concentration. Serum was prepared and T concentration was determined by LC-MS/MS. It was observed that TU degrades extensively to T in human blood under conditions typical of harvesting serum causing overestimation of T concentration of up to 243%. These results were confirmed in a clinical study in which serum and plasma samples were compared.

Conclusion: It was demonstrated that T must be analyzed in enzyme-inhibited plasma when TU is the administered medication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/fso.15.55DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5137954PMC
November 2015

9th GCC closed forum: CAPA in regulated bioanalysis; method robustness, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, regulatory audit experiences and electronic laboratory notebooks.

Bioanalysis 2016 Mar 26;8(6):487-95. Epub 2016 Feb 26.

WuXi/XBL, 107 Morgan Lane, Plainsboro, NJ, USA.

The 9th GCCClosed Forum was held just prior to the 2015 Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) in Miami, FL, USA on 13 April 2015. In attendance were 58 senior-level participants, from eight countries, representing 38 CRO companies offering bioanalytical services. The objective of this meeting was for CRO bioanalytical representatives to meet and discuss scientific and regulatory issues specific to bioanalysis. The issues selected at this year's closed forum include CAPA, biosimilars, preclinical method validation, endogenous biomarkers, whole blood stability, and ELNs. A summary of the industry's best practices and the conclusions from the discussion of these topics is included in this meeting report.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.16.16DOI Listing
March 2016

Recommendations on incurred sample stability (ISS) by GCC.

Bioanalysis 2014 Sep;6(18):2385-90

Quintiles Bioanalytical & ADME Labs, Ithaca, NY, USA.

The topic of incurred sample stability (ISS) has generated considerable discussion within the bioanalytical community in recent years. The subject was an integral part of the seventh annual Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) held in Long Beach, CA, USA, in April 2013, and at the Global CRO Council for Bioanalysis (GCC) meeting preceding it. Discussion at both events focused on the use of incurred samples for ISS purposes in light of results from a recent GCC survey completed by member companies. This paper reports the consensus resulting from these discussions and serves as a useful reference for depicting ISS issues and concerns, summarizing the GCC survey results and providing helpful recommendations on ISS in the context of bioanalytical method development and application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.14.155DOI Listing
September 2014

Impact of hemolysis during sample collection: how different is drug concentration in hemolyzed plasma from that of normal plasma?

J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2012 Jul 12;901:79-84. Epub 2012 Jun 12.

PharmaNet Canada Inc., Québec, Canada.

Hemolysis is a common phenomenon in clinical studies. Despite the growing interest in hemolysis matrix effect, how hemolysis impacts the representability of hemolyzed plasma samples was rarely evaluated. The purpose of this research is to perform such an evaluation by theoretical consideration and experiment. A formula for estimating the impact is proposed, which includes the degree of hemolysis and the drug's red blood cell (RBC): plasma concentration ratio. The impact of hemolysis on the representability of hemolyzed plasma samples is compound-dependant. Given the same degree of hemolysis, the stronger a drug binds to RBCs, the more significant the impact of hemolysis. For a drug with high affinity to RBCs, the results of hemolyzed plasma samples may not be useful even though they are accurate. There is an overall agreement between theoretical predication and experimental results. Among the ten different drug compounds tested, only methazolamide, which binds strongly to RBCs, showed significant change in plasma concentration due to hemolysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2012.06.002DOI Listing
July 2012

Analyte and internal standard cross signal contributions and their impact on quantitation in LC-MS based bioanalysis.

J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2011 Jul 27;879(21):1954-60. Epub 2011 May 27.

PharmaNet Canada, Québec, QC, Canada.

Cross signal contributions between an analyte and its internal standard (IS) are very common due to impurities in reference standards and/or isotopic interferences. Despite the general awareness of this issue, how exactly they affect quantitation in LC-MS based bioanalysis has not been systematically evaluated. In this research, such evaluations were performed first by simulations and then by experiments using a typical bioanalytical method for tiagabine over the concentration range of 1-1000 ng/mL in human EDTA K(3) plasma. The results demonstrate that when an analyte contributes to IS signal, linearity and accuracy can be affected with low IS concentration. Thus, minimum IS concentrations have been obtained for different combinations of concentration range, percentage of cross contribution, and weighting factor. Moreover, while impurity in analyte reference standard is a factor in cross signal contribution, significant systematic errors could exist in the results of unknown samples even though the results of calibration standards and quality controls are acceptable. How these systematic errors would affect stability evaluation, method transfer, and cross validation has also been discussed and measures to reduce their impact are proposed. On the other hand, the signal contribution from an IS to the analyte causes shifting of a calibration curve, i.e. increase of intercept, and theoretically, the accuracy is not affected. The simulation results are well supported by experimental results. For example, good inter-run (between-run) accuracy (bias: -2.70 to 5.35%) and precision (CV: 2.07-10.50%) were obtained when runs were extracted with an IS solution containing 1-fold of the lower limit of quantitation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2011.05.027DOI Listing
July 2011

Beyond successful ISR: case-by-case investigations for unmatched reassay results when ISR passed.

Bioanalysis 2011 May;3(9):1031-8

Bioanalytical Division, PharmaNet Canada Inc., 2500 Einstein, Québec, Canada.

Incurred sample reanalysis (ISR) is now commonly practiced in regulated bioanalytical laboratories. With an average ISR success rate of 95% or higher and an increasing number of ISR tests being conducted, more and more situations deserve scientific evaluation or investigation for the unmatched reassay results revealed in ISR tests even though they meet the acceptance criteria. First, should an investigation be initiated when an ISR test is acceptable? How large a discrepancy or what situation would warrant an investigation? What would be the impact on a study? How would investigations regarding unmatched reassay results be conducted? What are the main root causes identified? Can normal random errors cause a large discrepancy in unfavorable combinations? How could the timeline and cost be affected? All these questions are addressed in this paper with five real case examples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.10.205DOI Listing
May 2011