Publications by authors named "Nadia Khalida Waheed"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

PLoS One 2015 14;10(12):e0144557. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan.

In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR).
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0144557PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4679138PMC
June 2016

Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan.

PLoS One 2015 16;10(3):e0119806. Epub 2015 Mar 16.

Department of Biosciences, Commission on Science and Technology for Sustainable Development in the South Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan; Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Molecular Life sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Background: Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD).

Methods: We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), or cone dystrophy (CD). We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS) of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families.

Results: Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1.

Conclusions: Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0119806PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4361598PMC
January 2016

A missense mutation in the splicing factor gene DHX38 is associated with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa with macular coloboma.

J Med Genet 2014 Jul 15;51(7):444-8. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

Faculty of Science, Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Background: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most frequent inherited retinal disease, which shows a relatively high incidence of the autosomal-recessive form in Pakistan.

Methods: Genome-wide high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays were used to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals of one consanguineous family. DNA of three affected and two healthy siblings was used for SNP genotyping. Genotyping data were then analysed by Homozygosity Mapper. DNA of the proband was further analysed employing exome sequencing.

Results: Homozygosity mapping revealed a single homozygous region on chromosome 16, shared by three affected individuals. Subsequent exome sequencing identified a novel missense mutation, c.995G>A; p.(Gly332Asp), in DHX38. This mutation was found to be present in a homozygous state in four affected individuals while two healthy siblings and the parents of the affected persons were heterozygous for this mutation. This variant thereby yields a logarithm of the odds (LOD) score of 3.25, which is highly suggestive for linkage. This variant was neither detected in 180 ethnically matched control individuals, nor in 7540 Africans or Caucasians and an in-house database that contained the exome data of 400 individuals.

Conclusions: By combining genome-wide homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, a novel missense mutation was identified in the DHX38 gene that encodes the pre-mRNA splicing factor PRP16, in a Pakistani family with early-onset autosomal-recessive RP. The phenotype is different from those associated with other retinal pre-mRNA splicing factors and DHX38 is the first pre-mRNA splicing gene that is putatively associated with autosomal-recessive inherited RP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2014-102316DOI Listing
July 2014

Association of Pro12Ala polymorphism in peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

Mol Vis 2013 21;19:710-7. Epub 2013 Mar 21.

Department of Biosciences, Faculty of Science, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Purpose: The association of non-synonymous substitution polymorphism rs1801282 (c.34C>G, p.Pro12Ala) in exon 4 of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma gene with diabetic retinopathy (DR) has been reported inconsistently. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to understand the population-specific role of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in DR susceptibility in Pakistani subjects.

Methods: A total of 180 subjects with DR, 193 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with no diabetic retinopathy, and 200 healthy normoglycemic non-retinopathic Pakistani individuals were genotyped for the rs1801282 (c.34C>G) polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism.

Results: We found the individuals with T2DM carrying 12Ala were at a reduced risk of developing DR (odds ratio [OR]=0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.33-0.87). Upon stratified analysis regarding disease severity, we observed this protective effect was confined to proliferative DR (OR=0.4; 95% CI=0.2-0.8) with non-significant effects on the susceptibility of non-proliferative DR (OR=0.67; 95% CI=0.37-1.19).

Conclusions: We report a protective role of the 12Ala polymorphism against proliferative DR in individuals with T2DM in Pakistan.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3611930PMC
September 2013

Identification of recurrent and novel mutations in TULP1 in Pakistani families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa.

Mol Vis 2012 10;18:1226-37. Epub 2012 May 10.

Department of Biosciences, Faculty of Science, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Purpose: To identify the genetic defects underlying retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in Pakistani families.

Methods: Genome-wide high-density single-nucleotide-polymorphism microarray analysis was performed using the DNA of nine affected individuals from two large families with multiple consanguineous marriages. Data were analyzed to identify homozygous regions that are shared by affected sibs in each family. Sanger sequencing was performed for genes previously implicated in autosomal recessive RP and allied retinal dystrophies that resided in the identified homozygous regions. Probands from both families underwent fundus examination and electroretinogram measurements.

Results: The tubby-like protein 1 gene (TULP1) was present in the largest homozygous region in both families. Sequence analysis identified a previously reported mutation (c.1138A>G; p.Thr380Ala) in one family and a novel pathogenic variant (c.1445G>A; p.Arg482Gln) in the other family. Both variants were found to be present in a homozygous state in all affected individuals, were heterozygous present in the unaffected parents, and heterozygous present or absent in normal individuals. Affected individuals of both families showed an early-onset form of RP.

Conclusions: Homozygosity mapping, combined with candidate-gene analysis, successfully identified genetic defects in TULP1 in two large Pakistani families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3365133PMC
December 2012

XRCC1 and XPD DNA repair gene polymorphisms: a potential risk factor for glaucoma in the Pakistani population.

Mol Vis 2011 4;17:1153-63. Epub 2011 May 4.

Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Purpose: The present study was designed to determine the association of polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (c.1316G>A [rs25487]) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (c.2298A>C [rs13181]) with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary closed-angle glaucoma (PCAG).

Methods: In this prospective case-control study, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to study the association of XRCC1 and XPD with 160 POAG patients, 163 PCAG patients, and 193 unaffected controls.

Results: XRCC1 rs25487 was found to be significantly associated specifically with male POAG patients (χ(2) = 13.2 [p = 0.001]), only for the dominant model (odds ratio [OR] = 2.65 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44-4.85], p < 0.005). In addition XPD rs13181 was also found to be associated with male POAG patients (χ(2) = 12.1 [p < 0.005]), for both dominant (OR = 2.44 [95% CI = 1.33-4.47], p < 0.005) as well as recessive model (OR = 3.62 [95% CI = 1.45-9.01], p < 0.01). Combined genotypes of both the genes revealed that the heterozygote AC/GA was significantly associated with the male POAG patients (z = 3.00 [p < 0.001]). The AA/GG genotype was present at a higher frequency in the male controls and the AA/GA in the female controls and could thus have a protective role in males and females, respectively.

Conclusions: We postulate that defects in the DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XPD may possibly be associated with the progression of POAG in male patients of Pakistani origin.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3102023PMC
September 2011

Efficacy of etanercept in preventing relapse of uveitis controlled by methotrexate.

Arch Ophthalmol 2003 Apr;121(4):437-40

Ocular Immunology and Uveitis Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston 02114, USA.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of etanercept vs placebo in preventing relapses of uveitis in patients taking methotrexate with control of uveitis and whose methotrexate dosage was being tapered.

Methods: Patients with chronic or recurrent noninfectious uveitis with inflammation controlled by low-dose methotrexate were randomized to either the drug or placebo group in a double-masked manner, given a methotrexate taper schedule, and followed for 24 weeks. The main outcome measures were control of inflammation, visual acuity, and adverse reactions. Data were analyzed both as an attempt-to-treat analysis and an analysis only of those patients who completed the study.

Results: A total of 20 patients were randomized to the drug and placebo groups. Relapse of uveitis occurred in 3 of 10 patients in the treatment group and 5 of 10 patients in the control group. Two patients in the treatment group withdrew prematurely from the study due to adverse effects. There was no significant difference between the treatment and placebo groups with regard to the rate of relapse and the final visual acuity. No patient suffered from any irreversible, long-term morbidity or mortality.

Conclusion: Etanercept has no significant efficacy over placebo in preventing relapses of uveitis in patients being tapered from methotrexate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archopht.121.4.437DOI Listing
April 2003