Publications by authors named "Naciye Füsun Toraman"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of lumbar lordosis increment on gait deteriorations in ambulant boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A cross-sectional study.

Braz J Phys Ther 2021 May 24. Epub 2021 May 24.

Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Department of Neurology, Health Sciences University, Antalya, Turkey; Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Neuromuscular Disease Center, Health Sciences University, Antalya, Turkey.

Background: Increment of lumbar lordosis, a frequent spinal finding in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), is a compensatory mechanism secondary to muscle weakness. However, excessive lumbar lordosis may change the position of the center of mass, and lead to balance and walking difficulties.

Objective: To study the relationship between factors that may influence ambulatory function in boys with DMD and to investigate the effects of lumbar lordosis increment on gait and balance perturbations.

Methods: Twenty-one ambulant patients with DMD and 10 healthy boys were included. Lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis angles, dynamic and static balance tests, ambulatory function, muscle strength, and disease severity were assessed. Usage of steroids and orthotic devices were recorded. Scoliosis was assessed on radiographs. Receiver operator characteristic curves were formed and area under curve (AUC) measurements were performed to assess the ability of the tests to discriminate ambulatory status and optimal cut-off values were established according to the Youden index.

Results: The amount of lumbar lordosis correlated strongly and negatively with quality of ambulation (r = -0.710) and moderately with performance on balance tests. The strength of both upper limbs and lower limbs muscles were not associated with any of the variables. According to the AUC analysis, patients with a lumbar lordosis higher than 36° had worse scores on gait and dynamic balance tests.

Conclusion: Ambulation and dynamic balance are negatively affected by the increment of lumbar lordosis with a cut-off point of 36°in boys with DMD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjpt.2021.05.001DOI Listing
May 2021

Restless legs syndrome in children with allergic rhinitis: A comparative study on frequency, severity and sleep quality.

Turk J Phys Med Rehabil 2018 Sep 12;64(3):198-204. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Health Sciences University, Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey.

Objectives: This study aims to investigate the frequency and severity of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and its relationship with sleep quality in children with allergic rhinitis (AR) with the hypothesis that comorbid RLS may be an additional causative factor of sleep disturbances in pediatric AR.

Patients And Methods: A total of 143 children with AR (aged 8-18 years) and 144 healthy control subjects (aged 8-18 years) were included. The diagnosis of AR was established on history, clinical examination and skin prick test according to the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma guidelines. Presence of RLS was determined using the International RLS study group (IRLSSG) criteria. The severity of RLS was assessed using the IRLSSG rating scale. Sleep quality was evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI).

Results: Thirteen patients (9.1%) in AR group, and six children (4.2%) in control group had RLS (p=0.159). The frequency of RLS in AR group was higher than two folds when compared to the control group; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Restless legs syndrome severity score was significantly higher in AR group than control group (15.00 [11-20] and 11.00 [10-16] respectively, p=0.046). Total PSQI scores were similar between groups. Also, no significant differences were observed in total PSQI scores of AR patients with or without RLS.

Conclusion: Restless legs syndrome was not more common but was more severe in children with AR. There was no evidence that RLS has an obvious effect on sleep quality in children with AR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5606/tftrd.2018.2265DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6657790PMC
September 2018

Mechanical Traction for Lumbar Radicular Pain: Supine or Prone? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2018 06;97(6):433-439

From the Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Antalya, Turkey (MBF, ŞKD, NFT); Antalya Atatürk State Hospital, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic, Antalya, Turkey (ZK); Mut State Hospital, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic, Mersin, Turkey (AU); and Private Likya Hospital, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic, Antalya, Turkey (TÇ).

Objective: The aim of the study was to compare the effects of mechanical lumbar traction either in the supine or in the prone position with conventional physical therapy (PT) in patients with chronic low back pain and lumbosacral nerve root involvement in terms of disability, pain, and mobility.

Design: Participants (N = 125) were randomly assigned to receive 15 sessions of PT with additional mechanical lumbar traction either in the supine position (supine traction group) or in the prone position (prone traction group) or only PT without traction (PT only group). Patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of the PT sessions in terms of disability, pain, and mobility. Disability was assessed using the modified Oswesty Disability Index; pain was assessed using a visual analog scale, and lumbar mobility was assessed using the modified lumbar Schober test.

Results: One hundred eighteen patients completed the trial. All groups improved significantly in the Oswesty Disability Index, visual analog scale, and modified lumbar Schober test (P < 0.05). In the between-group analysis, improvements of Oswesty Disability Index and visual analog scale were found significantly better in the prone traction group compared with the PT only group (adjusted P = 0.031 and 0.006, respectively).

Conclusions: Addition of traction in the prone position to other modalities resulted in larger immediate improvements in terms of pain and disability, and the results suggest that when using traction, prone traction might be first choice. Further research is needed to confirm the benefits of lumbar traction in the prone position.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0000000000000892DOI Listing
June 2018

Late-onset Hirayama disease presenting with ulnar neuropathy: A case report.

J Pak Med Assoc 2017 Aug;67(8):1280-1282

Department of Neurology, Akdeniz University, School of Medicine, Antalya, Turkey.

Hirayama disease (HD) was first reported by Hirayama et al. in 1959. The disease is considered as a type of benign focal motor neuron disease that primarily affects upper limbs of young males. In this case report, we present a man aged 40-years with rapidly progressive weakness and atrophy in his left hand. The findings of nerve conduction studies were consistent with left ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Flexion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed minimal enlargement of the posterior epidural space and anterior displacement of the spinal cord. After exclusion of relevant diseases the patient was diagnosed as having Hirayama disease with ulnar neuropathy. Mild ulnar entrapment at the elbow may be considered as a clinical feature of HD. Therefore, it is recommended that young male patients with wasting in upper extremities with findings of ulnar entrapment should not be judged to have ulnar neuropathy before HD has been carefully excluded.
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August 2017

Electroneuromyographic findings in pseudoexfoliation syndrome.

Int Ophthalmol 2018 Apr 12;38(2):705-712. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey.

Purpose: To examine peripheral electroneuromyographic findings in patients with ocular pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX) and to compare them controls without PEX.

Methods: A case-control study design was used to examine 31 patients with PEX and compare the findings with those of 31 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All patients underwent complete ophthalmologic examination that included peripheral electroneuromyography examination. Motor and sensorial nerve conduction of the median, ulnar, tibial, peroneal, and sural nerve and the sympathetic skin response were measured.

Results: The average sensorial nerve latency of the ulnar and sural nerve was significantly longer in the PEX group compared to the control group (p < 0.05). The average sensorial nerve conduction amplitude and the velocity of the ulnar and sural nerve were significantly lower in the PEX group (p < 0.05).

Discussion: Peripheral nerves, especially sensorial fibers, appear to be affected in PEX patients. These finding may indicate that PEX is a systemic disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10792-017-0520-8DOI Listing
April 2018

Addition of Suprascapular Nerve Block to a Physical Therapy Program Produces an Extra Benefit to Adhesive Capsulitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2015 Oct;94(10 Suppl 1):912-20

From the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Atatürk State Hospital, Antalya, Turkey (ZK); and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey (MBF, TÇ, NFT).

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of suprascapular nerve block plus physical therapy (PT) with PT alone for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

Design: Forty-one patients with adhesive capsulitis were randomly assigned to the injection group (n = 19) or PT-alone control group (n = 22). All patients received PT consisting of electrotherapy, range of motion, stretching, and strengthening exercises. The patients in the injection group received suprascapular nerve block before PT. Pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, and functional status was assessed with the total Constant score.

Results: In both groups, significant differences were found in all parameters of the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form compared with baseline levels apart from walking ability in the last 24 hrs (P = not applicable). However, the differences of mean pain severity in the last 24 hrs at first to second and first to third assessments, pain severity at that time at first to second assessments, percentage improvement at second to third assessments, general activity in the last 24 hrs at first to second and first to third assessments, and enjoyment of life in the last 24 hrs at first to second and first to third assessments were statistically significant in favor of the injection group (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: The current study supports that suprascapular nerve block is a safe and well-tolerated method. PT was found to be effective in reducing pain severity and functional disability, and the addition of suprascapular nerve block to PT improved functional status and pain levels in patients with adhesive capsulitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0000000000000336DOI Listing
October 2015

An evaluation of sleep quality and the prevalence of restless leg syndrome in vitamin D deficiency.

Acta Neurol Belg 2015 Dec 23;115(4):623-7. Epub 2015 Apr 23.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Varlık Mahallesi Kazım Karabekir Caddesi Soğuksu, 07100, Antalya, Turkey.

Vitamin D is known to increase levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the brain and also protects dopaminergic neurons against dopaminergic toxins. The aims of the study were to assess the frequency and symptom severity of restless leg syndrome (RLS) and sleep quality in vitamin D deficiency. A total of 102 patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, comprising 57 vitamin D deficient patients as Group 1 and 45 patients with normal levels of vitamin D as Group 2. RLS was diagnosed according to the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) diagnostic criteria. Symptom severity was assessed using the IRLSSG rating scale and sleep quality was measured with the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). RLS incidence was higher in Group 1 (p = 0.034). The PSQI scores were higher in Group 1 and the difference between the groups was determined as statistically significant (p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was determined in respect of the clinical evaluation and the IRLSSG Symptom Severity Scale between the patients in Group 1 diagnosed with RLS and the patients in Group 2 diagnosed with RLS (p > 0.05). The findings of this study support the hypothesis that RLS is more frequent and more severe in vitamin D deficiency and indicate a negative effect of vitamin deficiency on sleep parameters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13760-015-0474-4DOI Listing
December 2015

Comparison of efficacy of kinesiological taping and subacromial injection therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome.

Clin Rheumatol 2016 Mar 18;35(3):741-6. Epub 2014 Nov 18.

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Department, Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey.

The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of kinesiological taping and subacromial injection therapy in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Seventy patients diagnosed with SIS were randomly assigned to group 1 (n = 35, injection group) or group 2 (n = 35, kinesiological taping group). Betamethasone plus prilocaine was injected to subacromial space in the patients in group 1. In group 2, tape was applied three times for a period of five consecutive days with a 2-day recovery interval. A 3-month exercise program was prescribed for both groups including stretching and strengthening exercises. All patients were assessed at baseline and at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Assessments were made by visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion (ROM) measurements, specific tests, and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI). Significant differences were detected in VAS and SPADI scores as well as ROM measurements in both groups when compared to baseline (p > 0.05). No significant differences were detected between the groups except for active flexion degree in favor of group 1 (p = 0.004). Both kinesiological taping and steroid injection in conjunction with an exercise program were found to be effective in the treatment of SIS. Kinesio taping may be an alternative treatment option in the rehabilitation of SIS especially when a non-invasive technique is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-014-2824-7DOI Listing
March 2016
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