Publications by authors named "Nabeela Al-Abdullah"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Seroprevalence of Dromedary Camel HEV in Domestic and Imported Camels from Saudi Arabia.

Viruses 2020 05 18;12(5). Epub 2020 May 18.

Special Infectious Agents Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80216, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.

Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) imposes a major health concern in areas with very poor sanitation in Africa and Asia. The pathogen is transmitted mainly through ingesting contaminated water or food, coming into contact with affected people, and blood transfusions. Very few reports including old reports are available on the prevalence of HEV in Saudi Arabia in humans and no reports exist on HEV prevalence in camels. Dromedary camel trade and farming are increasing in Saudi Arabia with importation occurring unidirectionally from Africa to Saudi Arabia. DcHEV transmission to humans has been reported in one case from the United Arab Emeritus (UAE). This instigated us to perform this investigation of the seroprevalence of HEV in imported and domestic camels in Saudi Arabia. Serum samples were collected from imported and domestic camels. DcHEV-Abs were detected in collected sera using ELISA. The prevalence of DcHEV in the collected samples was 23.1% with slightly lower prevalence in imported camels than domestic camels (22.4% vs. 25.4%, value = 0.3). Gender was significantly associated with the prevalence of HEV in the collected camels ( value = 0.015) where males (31.6%) were more infected than females (13.4%). This study is the first study to investigate the prevalence of HEV in dromedary camels from Saudi Arabia. The high seroprevalence of DcHEV in dromedaries might indicate their role as a zoonotic reservoir for viral infection to humans. Future HEV seroprevalence studies in humans are needed to investigate the role of DcHEV in the Saudi human population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v12050553DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7290434PMC
May 2020

Genomic and antimicrobial resistance genes diversity in multidrug-resistant CTX-M-positive isolates of Escherichia coli at a health care facility in Jeddah.

J Infect Public Health 2020 Jan 4;13(1):94-100. Epub 2019 Jul 4.

Special Infectious Agents Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Background: Whole genome sequencing has revolutionized epidemiological investigations of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria worldwide. Aim of this study was to perform comprehensive characterization of ESBL-positive isolates of Escherichia coli obtained from clinical samples at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital utilizing whole genome sequencing.

Methods: Isolates were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Genome sequencing was performed using a paired-end strategy on the MiSeq platform.

Results: Nineteen isolates were clustered into different clades in a phylogenetic tree based on single nucleotide polymorphisms in core genomes. Seventeen sequence types were identified in the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive isolates, and 11 subtypes were identified based on distinct types of fimH alleles. Forty-one acquired resistance genes were found in the 19 genomes. The bla gene, which encodes ESBL, was found in 15 isolates and was the most predominant resistance gene. Other antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) found in the isolates were associated with resistance to tetracycline (tetA), aminoglycoside [aph(3″)-Ib, and aph(6)-Id], and sulfonamide (sul1, and sul2). Nonsynonymous chromosomal mutations in the housekeeping genes parC and gyrA were commonly found in several genomes.

Conclusion: Several other ARGs were found in CTX-M-positive E. coli isolates confer resistance to clinically important antibiotics used to treat infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2019.06.011DOI Listing
January 2020

Molecular characterization, antimicrobial resistance and clinico-bioinformatics approaches to address the problem of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in western Saudi Arabia.

Sci Rep 2018 10 4;8(1):14847. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Special Infectious Agents Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

The goal of this study was to genotypically characterize extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates from the western region of Saudi Arabia and to identify active antibiotics against these isolates using phenotypic and molecular modeling. In total, 211 ESBL-producing E. coli isolates recovered from heterogeneous clinical specimens were identified by MALDI-TOF. Thirty-two sequence types (STs) were identified from a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis of ESBL-producing E. coli, including a novel ST (ST8162). The most common ST in the Saudi and expatriate population was ST131, followed by ST38. All the isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and >95% of the isolates were resistant to third-generation (ceftriaxone and ceftazidime) and fourth-generation (cefepime) cephalosporins. The ESBL-positive E. coli isolates primarily harbored the bla and bla genes. No resistance was observed against the carbapenem antibiotic group. All the ESBL-producing E. coli isolates were observed to be susceptible to a ceftazidime/avibactam combination. Molecular interaction analyses of the docked complexes revealed the amino acid residues crucial for the binding of antibiotics and inhibitors to the modeled CTX-M-15 enzyme. Importantly, avibactam displayed the most robust interaction with CTX-M-15 among the tested inhibitors in the docked state (∆G = -6.6 kcal/mol). The binding free energy values for clavulanate, tazobactam and sulbactam were determined to be -5.7, -5.9 and -5.2 kcal/mol, respectively. Overall, the study concludes that 'ceftazidime along with avibactam' should be carefully used as a treatment option against only carbapenem-resistant MDR ESBL-producing E. coli in this region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33093-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6172265PMC
October 2018

WMSS: A Web-Based Multitiered Surveillance System for Predicting CLABSI.

Biomed Res Int 2018 5;2018:5419313. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Information Systems, Faculty of Computing and Information Technology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates are a key quality metric for comparing hospital quality and safety. Manual surveillance systems for CLABSIs are time-consuming and often limited to intensive care units (ICUs). A computer-automated method of CLABSI detection can improve the validity of surveillance. A new web-based, multitiered surveillance system for predicting and reducing CLABSI is proposed. The system has the capability to collect patient-related data from hospital databases and hence predict the patient infection automatically based on knowledge discovery rules and CLABSI decision standard algorithms. In addition, the system has a built-in simulator for generating patients' data records, when needed, offering the capability to train nurses and medical staff for enhancing their qualifications. Applying the proposed system, both CLABSI rates and patient treatment costs can be reduced significantly. The system has many benefits, among which there is the following: it is a web-based system that can collect real patients' data from many IT resources using iPhone, iPad, laptops, Internet, scanners, and hospital databases. These facilities help to collect patients' actual data quickly and safely in electronic format and hence predict CLABSI efficiently. Automation of the patients' data diagnosis process helps in reducing CLABSI detection times. The system is multimedia-based; it uses text, colors, and graphics to enhance patient healthcare report generation and charts. It helps healthcare decision makers to review and approve policies and surveillance plans to reduce and prevent CLABSI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/5419313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6057346PMC
January 2019

Improving Prediction Accuracy of "Central Line-Associated Blood Stream Infections" Using Data Mining Models.

Biomed Res Int 2017 20;2017:3292849. Epub 2017 Sep 20.

Department of Information Systems, Faculty of Computing and Information Technology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Prediction of nosocomial infections among patients is an important part of clinical surveillance programs to enable the related personnel to take preventive actions in advance. Designing a clinical surveillance program with capability of predicting nosocomial infections is a challenging task due to several reasons, including high dimensionality of medical data, heterogenous data representation, and special knowledge required to extract patterns for prediction. In this paper, we present details of six data mining methods implemented using cross industry standard process for data mining to predict central line-associated blood stream infections. For our study, we selected datasets of healthcare-associated infections from US National Healthcare Safety Network and consumer survey data from Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. Our experiments show that central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) can be successfully predicted using AdaBoost method with an accuracy up to 89.7%. This will help in implementing effective clinical surveillance programs for infection control, as well as improving the accuracy detection of CLABSIs. Also, this reduces patients' hospital stay cost and maintains patients' safety.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/3292849DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5632447PMC
June 2018

Epidemiology and clinical consequences of occupational exposure to blood and other body fluids in a university hospital in Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Med J 2016 Jul;37(7):783-90

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. E-mail.

Objectives: To describe the epidemiological characteristics, clinical impact, and adequacy of post-exposure management of occupational exposure to blood and body fluids (BBFs). 

Methods: Retrospective chart review of individuals reporting exposure to BBFs from 2007 to 2013 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 

Results: The total number of exposures reported was 326 exposures, of which 302 (92.6%) exposures were percutaneous, 21 (6.5%), mucocutaneous, and 3 (0.9%), bites. Nursing staff/students had the highest rate of exposure (149, or 45.6%), followed by physicians (57, or 17.5%). Surgeons were found to have a significantly higher risk for sharp injuries compared with other physicians (26.3%, or 15 exposures, p less than 0.005). Most (216, or 72.5%) percutaneous injuries were caused by hollow-bore needles. Majority of exposures (124, or 42.6%) occurred after using the needle/sharp item and before disposal. Two-thirds (219, or 67%) of exposed individuals were immune to hepatitis B at the time of exposure. With appropriate post-exposure management, none of exposed individuals seroconverted to HIV, hepatitis B or C virus infections. 

Conclusion: Occupational exposure to BBFs remains a concern among healthcare workers. Educational programs targeting high-risk groups entailing reinforcement of prevention and adherence to post-exposure management guidelines are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15537/smj.2016.7.14261DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5018644PMC
July 2016