Publications by authors named "Na-Kyoung Lee"

72 Publications

Relationship between radiographic measurements and knee adduction moment using 3D gait analysis.

Gait Posture 2021 Sep 1;90:179-184. Epub 2021 Sep 1.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si, South Korea; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

Background: Radiographic factors estimate the state of the static knee joint, and it is questionable how well these parameters reflect the dynamic knee condition. The external knee adduction moment (KAM) during gait is known to be a kinetic variable contributing to osteoarthritis progression. This study aims to investigate the effects of static radiographic parameters on the dynamic KAM during gait.

Methods: Overall, 123 patients (mean age, 65.7 years; standard deviation, 8.1 years; 34 men and 89 women) were included. Seven radiographic parameters including the mechanical tibiofemoral angle (mTFA), Kellgren-Lawrence grade, and ankle joint line orientation (AJLO) were measured on radiographs, and the maximum KAM and KAM-time integral in the stance phase were obtained using three-dimensional gait analysis. The correlation and multiple regression analyses were performed for identifying significant radiographic measurements associated with the KAM.

Results: Most of the radiographic measurements correlated with the maximum KAM and KAM-time integral. As a result of multiple regression analysis, the mTFA (p < 0.001) and AJLO (p = 0.003) were identified as significant factors associated with the KAM-time integral (R = 0.450); the mTFA (p < 0.001) and AJLO (p = 0.003) were identified as a significant factor associated with the maximum KAM (R = 0.352) in multiple regression analysis. The discriminant validity of KAM was highest at varus 5.7 degree of the mTFA and 7.5 degree of the AJLO.

Significance: The mTFA and AJLO were significantly associated with the KAM. However, to be used as a surgical indication for corrective osteotomy, a longitudinal study is needed to validate whether the mTFA and AJLO values directly cause osteoarthritis progression as we have suggested.

Level Of Evidence: III.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2021.08.025DOI Listing
September 2021

Chrysanthemum indicum suppresses adipogenesis by inhibiting mitotic clonal expansion in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

J Food Biochem 2021 Sep 9;45(9):e13896. Epub 2021 Aug 9.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.

Herbs have been of interest to treat diseases, including obesity, owing to their various bioactive constituents that exhibit therapeutic and prophylactic properties. The present study examined the anti-adipogenic effects and mechanisms of Chrysanthemum indicum aqueous extract (CAE) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. CAE comprises 1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid, chlorogenic acid, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, caffeic acid, and apigenin, which were corresponded with previous reports. CAE inhibited the accumulation of lipid droplets and significantly alleviated the expression of lipogenesis- and adipogenesis-associated biomarkers. Treatment with CAE inhibited the mitotic clonal expansion (MCE), corroborated by cell cycle arrest at the G /G phase, and mitigated the expression of cell cycle progression-associated proteins and in addition to phosphorylation of MCE-promoting transcription factors. Moreover, CAE downregulated the activation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathways. In summary, CAE facilitates adipogenic inhibition during the early phase of differentiation, especially MCE, and its phenolic compounds can contribute to its anti-obesogenic properties. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: Chrysanthemum indicum has been mainly used as traditional herbal tea and drinks. Chrysanthemum indicum aqueous extract (CAE) inhibits adipogenesis by suppressing mitotic clonal expansion during the early phase of differentiation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. 1,3-Dicaffeoylquinic acid, chlorogenic acid, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, caffeic acid, and apigenin were detected in CAE. Based on these findings, CAE can be used as nutraceutical agents for prevention and treatment of obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfbc.13896DOI Listing
September 2021

Effect of distance between the feet on knee joint line orientation after total knee arthroplasty in standing full-limb radiographs.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2021 Jul 16. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si, South Korea.

Purpose: Although knee joint line orientation (KJLO) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been emphasized as an important factor that can affect postoperative knee kinematics, the effect of foot position on KJLO has not been fully understood. This study aimed to (1) identify the anatomical and positional factors that determine KJLO after TKA, and (2) determine the effect of foot position on KJLO after TKA. The hypothesis of this study was that the post-TKA KJLO would change depending on the distance between the feet, as well as the coronal implant positions.

Methods: A total of 92 radiographs from 46 patients who underwent TKA were retrospectively reviewed. Two postoperative standing full-limb anteroposterior radiographs taken with the feet in different positions (with both feet in contact with each other or shoulder width apart) from each patient were evaluated. The correlation between KJLO after TKA and possible anatomical and positional factors, including leg length, lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA), ankle joint line orientation (AJLO), mechanical tibiofemoral angle (mTFA), and distance between the feet, were analyzed, and the KJLO equation was computed using multiple linear regression. KJLO was also compared among different combinations of valgus or varus alignment of the femoral and tibial components.

Results: LDFA, MPTA, AJLO, and distance between the feet were identified as determinants of KJLO after TKA, and the distance between the feet was strongly correlated with KJLO. Based on the KJLO equation (KJLO [°] = 107.548 - 0.441 × LDFA [°] - 0.832 × MPTA [°] + 0.093 × AJLO [°] + 0.037 × ITD [mm]), KJLO changes by 3.7° per 100 mm of distance between the feet. The KJLO of patients with valgus femoral and varus tibial components was more parallel to the ground than those with other combinations.

Conclusion: KJLO after TKA was strongly affected by the distance between the feet when taking full-limb radiography, and the KJLO changed by 3.7° per 100 mm of distance between the feet. To assess the KJLO after TKA reproducibly, standardization of the distance between the feet is necessary.

Level Of Evidence: IV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-021-06662-0DOI Listing
July 2021

Anti-adipogenic Effects of the Probiotic Lactiplantibacillus plantarum KU15117 on 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins 2021 Jul 15. Epub 2021 Jul 15.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resource, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029, Republic of Korea.

In this study, we investigated the probiotic properties and anti-obesity effects of bacterial strains isolated from homemade kimchi. Lactiplantibacillus plantarum KU15117 was isolated using lactobacilli selective medium. L. plantarum KU15117 did not produce β-glucuronidase and showed high tolerance to artificial gastric juice and bile salt, acceptable resistance to antibiotics, and high adhesion ability to HT-29 cells. The anti-adipogenic activity of L. plantarum KU15117 at 10 CFU/well was confirmed by the reduction of oil red O staining and intracellular triglyceride level. Additionally, the expression levels of fatty acid synthase, CCAAT/enhance-binding protein-α, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, which are associated with the early stage of adipocyte differentiation, were significantly lower in the probiotic-treated group than in the control group. These results suggest that L. plantarum KU15117 has probiotic properties and anti-obesity effects and could be used as a prophylactic probiotics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12602-021-09818-zDOI Listing
July 2021

Fermented dairy products as delivery vehicles of novel probiotic strains isolated from traditional fermented Asian foods.

J Food Sci Technol 2021 Jul 23;58(7):2467-2478. Epub 2020 Oct 23.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029 Korea.

The screening of novel probiotic strains from various food sources including fruits, vegetables, herbs, and traditional fermented foods, have been of growing concern recently. Most of these potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolates were distinguished from the commercial probiotics based on multiple therapeutic effects and functionalities. Recent in vitro and in vivo investigates have also verified the usage of probiotics to lower the risk of diseases. Application of these novel strains in fermented dairy products is also an emerging trend to improve the physical and quality characteristics, functional properties, and safety of dairy products. Moreover, since dairy products are one of the highest consumed products in the globe, the dispatch channels for fermented dairy products are already established. Therefore, incorporating novel probiotic strains into fermented dairy products might be the most feasible approach for their delivery. In this context, our aim is to discuss the feasibility of dairy products as delivery vehicles for novel probiotic strains. Thus, we summarize the scientific evidence that points to a dynamic future for the production of fermented dairy-based probiotics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13197-020-04857-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8196123PMC
July 2021

Prophylactic effects of probiotics on respiratory viruses including COVID-19: a review.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2021 May 24:1-9. Epub 2021 May 24.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029 Republic of Korea.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is mainly transmitted through respiratory droplets. The symptoms include dry cough, fever, and fatigue; however, high propagation, mutation, and fatality rates have been reported for SARS-CoV-2. This review investigates the structure of SARS-CoV-2, antiviral mechanisms, preventive strategies, and remedies against it. Effective vaccines have been developed by Pfizer (95% effective), AstraZeneca (90% effective), Moderna (94.5% effective) vaccine, among others. However, herd immunity is also required. Probiotics play a major role in the gut health, and some are known to have therapeutic potential against viral infections. Their modes of antiviral activities include direct interaction with targeted viruses, production of antiviral metabolites, and immunomodulatory effects on the host. Hence, probiotics can be a useful prophylactic against COVID-19, and more studies are required on the effects of probiotics against other viral infections that may occur in future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-021-00913-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8142068PMC
May 2021

Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus brevis KU15153 against Streptococcus mutans KCTC 5316 causing dental caries.

Microb Pathog 2021 Aug 20;157:104938. Epub 2021 May 20.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029, South Korea. Electronic address:

This study determined the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus brevis KU15153 against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans KCTC 5316. Antimicrobial activity, auto-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, exopolysaccharides (EPS) production, biofilm formation, and morphological changes were assessed in the presence of L. brevis KU15153. L. brevis KU15153 exhibited the highest antimicrobial activity against S. mutans KCTC 5316 (28.67 ± 4.16 mm). Auto-aggregation (38.32%), cell surface hydrophobicity (27.08%), and EPS production rate (58.52%) of S. mutans KCTC 5316 slightly decreased upon treatment with L. brevis KU15153. Additionally, crystal violet stanning and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the L. brevis KU15153-mediated inhibition of biofilm formation by S. mutans KCTC 5316 in comparison to that observed in the negative control (untreated S. mutans KCTC 5316). These results indicate that the L. brevis KU15153 could be used as a potential probiotic for maintaining oral health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2021.104938DOI Listing
August 2021

Physicochemical Analysis of Yogurt Produced by H40 and Its Effects on Oxidative Stress in Neuronal Cells.

Food Sci Anim Resour 2021 Mar 1;41(2):261-273. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea.

H40 (H40) was isolated from kimchi, and its probiotic properties and neuroprotective effect was evaluated in oxidatively stressed SH-SY5Y cells. H40 was stable in artificial gastric conditions and can be attached in HT-29 cells. In addition, H40 did not produce β-glucuronidase and showed resistant to several antibiotics. The conditioned medium (CM) was made using HT-29 cells refined with heat-killed probiotics (Probiotics-CM) and heated yogurts (Y-CM) to investigate the neuroprotective effect. Treatment with H40-CM not only increased cell viability but also significantly improved brain derived neurotropic factor () expression and reduced the ratio in oxidatively stress-induced SH-SY5Y cells. Besides, probiotic Y-CM significantly increased mRNA expression and decreased ratio. The physicochemical properties of probiotic yogurt with H40 was not significantly different from the control yogurt. The viable cell counts of lactic acid bacteria in control and probiotic yogurt with H40 was 8.66 Log CFU/mL and 8.96 Log CFU/mL, respectively. Therefore, these results indicate that H40 can be used as prophylactic functional dairy food having neuroprotective effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5851/kosfa.2020.e97DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8115002PMC
March 2021

Optimization of Medium Composition for Biomass Production of 200655 Using Response Surface Methodology.

J Microbiol Biotechnol 2021 May;31(5):717-725

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea.

This study aimed to optimize medium composition and culture conditions for enhancing the biomass of 200655 using statistical methods. The one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) method was used to screen the six carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, maltose, fructose, lactose, and galactose) and six nitrogen sources (peptone, tryptone, soytone, yeast extract, beef extract, and malt extract). Based on the OFAT results, six factors were selected for the Plackett- Burman design (PBD) to evaluate whether the variables had significant effects on the biomass. Maltose, yeast extract, and soytone were assessed as critical factors and therefore applied to response surface methodology (RSM). The optimal medium composition by RSM was composed of 31.29 g/l maltose, 30.27 g/l yeast extract, 39.43 g/l soytone, 5 g/l sodium acetate, 2 g/l KHPO, 1 g/l Tween 80, 0.1 g/l MgSO·7HO, and 0.05 g/l MnSO·HO, and the maximum biomass was predicted to be 3.951 g/l. Under the optimized medium, the biomass of 200655 was 3.845 g/l, which was similar to the predicted value and 1.58-fold higher than that of the unoptimized medium (2.429 g/l). Furthermore, the biomass increased to 4.505 g/l under optimized cultivation conditions. For lab-scale bioreactor validation, batch fermentation was conducted with a 5-L bioreactor containing 3.5 L of optimized medium. As a result, the highest yield of biomass (5.866 g/l) was obtained after 18 h of incubation at 30°C, pH 6.5, and 200 rpm. In conclusion, mass production by 200655 could be enhanced to obtain higher yields than that in MRS medium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4014/jmb.2103.03018DOI Listing
May 2021

Antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects of probiotic KU200656 isolated from kimchi.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2021 Jan 23;30(1):97-106. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029 Republic of Korea.

The probiotic properties and anti-pathogenic effects of KU200656 (KU200656) isolated from Korean fermented kimchi against , , , and Typhimurium were investigated. KU200656 showed high tolerance to artificial gastric acid (99.48%) and bile salts (102.40%) and this strain was safe according to antibiotic sensitivity test; it could not produce harmful enzymes, including β-glucuronidase. KU200656 exhibited high adhesion (4.45%) to intestinal cells, HT-29 cells, with high cell surface hydrophobicity (87.31% for xylene and 81.11% for toluene). Moreover, KU200656 co-aggregated with pathogenic bacteria and exhibited antibacterial activity and anti-adhesion properties against pathogens. The cell-free supernatant (CFS) of KU200656 inhibited biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria. In addition, half of the minimum inhibitory concentration of the KU200656 CFS downregulated the expression of biofilm-related genes, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Therefore, KU200656 was demonstrated to possess anti-pathogenic effects and have potential for use as probiotics in the food industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-020-00837-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7847474PMC
January 2021

Neuroprotective Effects of Heat-Killed Lactobacillus plantarum 200655 Isolated from Kimchi Against Oxidative Stress.

Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins 2021 Jun 17;13(3):788-795. Epub 2021 Jan 17.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029, Republic of Korea.

Oxidative stress plays an important role in exacerbating neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. In a previous study, Lactobacillus plantarum 200655 was shown to possess probiotic and antioxidant potential. The current study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of heat-killed L. plantarum 200655. We incubated intestinal cells (HT-29) with heat-killed L. plantarum 200655 in a conditioned medium (CM) and found that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA level was elevated in the HT-29 cells and the CM contained high concentrations of BDNF. The CM protected neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) from hydrogen peroxide (HO)-induced toxicity. Moreover, the CM increased BDNF and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression and significantly reduced the apoptosis-related Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in HO-treated SH-SY5Y cells. At the protein level, the CM resulted in downregulation of caspase-3. These results indicate that L. plantarum 200655 might be used as a prophylactic functional ingredient to prevent neurodegenerative disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12602-020-09740-wDOI Listing
June 2021

Potential neuroprotective effects of heat-killed KC24 using SH-SY5Y cells against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2020 Dec 18;29(12):1735-1740. Epub 2020 Nov 18.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029 Korea.

The present study was an investigation of the neuroprotective effects of probiotic bacteria in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells experiencing oxidative stress. The bacterial strains were: commercial GG; two isolated bacterial strains ( KU200170 and KU200661); and probiotic KC24. To evaluate the neuroprotective effects of the bacteria, a conditioned medium (CM) was prepared using HT-29 cells cultured with the heat-killed probiotic strains. Of the bacterial strains tested, the oxidatively stressed SH-SY5Y cells were most viable when cultured with KC24-CM. KC24-CM promoted the expression of brain-derived neurotropic factor () in the HT-29 cells. It also significantly increased expression and reduced the apoptosis-related ratio in the oxidatively stressed SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, KC24 is a potential psychobiotic for use in the functional food industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-020-00830-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7708562PMC
December 2020

Inhibits Adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes via Modulation of Mitotic Clonal Expansion Involving ERK 1/2 and Akt Signaling Pathways.

Nutrients 2020 Oct 3;12(10). Epub 2020 Oct 3.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea.

The flower of contains various phenolic compounds with prophylactic properties. This study aimed to determine the anti-adipogenic effect of an flower aqueous extract (IAE) and its underlying mechanisms in the 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and to identify the phenolic compounds in the extract. Treatment with IAE inhibited the adipogenesis by showing a dose-dependent suppressed intracellular lipid accumulation and mitigated expression levels of lipogenesis- and adipogenesis-associated biomarkers including transcription factors. IAE exerted an anti-adipogenic effect through the modulation of the early phases of adipogenesis including mitotic clonal expansion (MCE). Treatment with IAE inhibited MCE by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and suppressing the activation of MCE-related transcription factors. Furthermore, IAE inhibited adipogenesis by regulating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, kaempferol-3--glucoside, and 6-methoxyluteolin, which are reported to exhibit anti-adipogenic properties, were detected in IAE. Therefore, modulation of early phases of adipogenesis, especially MCE, is a key mechanism underlying the anti-adipogenic activity of IAE. In summary, the anti-obesity effects of IAE can be attributed to its phenolic compounds, and hence, IAE can be used for the development of anti-obesity products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12103037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7599673PMC
October 2020

Anti-Biofilm Activity of Cell-Free Supernatant of against .

J Microbiol Biotechnol 2020 Dec;30(12):1854-1861

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea.

is one of the most common microorganisms and causes foodborne diseases. In particular, biofilm-forming is more resistant to antimicrobial agents and sanitizing treatments than planktonic cells. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the anti-biofilm effects of cell-free supernatant (CFS) of isolated from cucumber compared to grapefruit seed extract (GSE). CFS and GSE inhibited and degraded biofilms. The adhesion ability, auto-aggregation, and exopolysaccharide production of CFS-treated , compared to those of the control, were significantly decreased. Moreover, biofilm-related gene expression was altered upon CFS treatment. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed that CFS exerted anti-biofilm effects against . Therefore, these results suggest that S. cerevisiae CFS has anti-biofilm potential against strains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4014/jmb.2008.08053DOI Listing
December 2020

Probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum KU200060 isolated from watery kimchi and its application in probiotic yogurt for oral health.

Microb Pathog 2020 Oct 3;147:104430. Epub 2020 Aug 3.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Lactobacillus fermentum KU200060 was isolated from watery kimchi and its probiotic characteristics were evaluated, including tolerance to artificial gastric acid and bile salt, production of enzymes, ability to adhere to HT-29 cells, and antibiotic susceptibility. The antibacterial and antibiofilm effects of L. fermentum KU200060 against Streptococcus mutans KCTC 5316 were compared to those of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus brevis KU15006. L. fermentum KU200060 demonstrated higher antibacterial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation by S. mutans than L. rhamnosus GG via inhibiting formation of water-insoluble glucan and related gene expression. In addition, L. fermentum KU200060 was applied as a probiotic in yogurt, and its physicochemical property and sensory value demonstrated its potential as a yogurt starter. The physicochemical characteristics and consumer acceptability of the probiotic yogurt containing L. fermentum KU200060 were not significantly different compared to those of the control yogurt. Therefore, L. fermentum KU200060 could be used for oral health in the probiotic industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2020.104430DOI Listing
October 2020

Application of mixed natural preservatives to improve the quality of vacuum skin packaged beef during refrigerated storage.

Meat Sci 2020 Nov 10;169:108219. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

This study aimed to develop an active packaging (AP) system for beef storage using vacuum skin packaging (VSP) applied with mixed natural preservatives (MNPs) consisting of grapefruit seed extract (GSE), cinnamaldehyde (CA), and nisin; and to assess its effect on the physicochemical, microbial, and antibacterial properties against food-borne pathogens in beef compared with using wrapped packaging (WP) and VSP. The pH of the AP was a medium level of WP and VSP. AP was effective in preserving beef surface color including lightness and redness. AP delayed lipid oxidation and protein deterioration of beef by 14 days and 7 days as compared to that in WP and VSP, respectively. It also slowed low microbial counts of psychrotrophic and anaerobic bacteria about 1-2 Log CFU/g and inhibited the growth of experimented food-borne pathogens compared to initial inoculated counts. Our results indicated that MNPs applied to AP could be used to extend the shelf life of beef and prevent related food poisoning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2020.108219DOI Listing
November 2020

fermented with probiotic D30 exhibited anti-inflammatory effect and increased viability in RAW 264.7 cells.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2020 Apr 15;29(4):569-578. Epub 2019 Oct 15.

1Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029 Republic of Korea.

The objective of this study was to increase the bioavailability of (IB) through fermentation with probiotic D30, and to evaluate the chemical composition, viability, and anti-inflammatory effect of fermented (FIB). IB was fermented with D30 at 37 °C for 24 h. FIB increased total phenolic content and decreased total flavonoid content of IB. 1--acetylbritannilactone and ergolide production, which are associated with the viability, increased from 1.38 to 4.13 μg/mg, and decreased from 5.24 to 0.94 μg/mg, in the control and FIB, respectively. In addition, the cell viability of RAW264.7 cells increased when pretreated with 400 μg/mL FIB. FIB inhibited the production of nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPKs pathways. Therefore, FIB with D30 reduced the toxicity and increased the anti-inflammatory properties. These results indicate that FIB is a potential beneficial bioactive agent for functional foods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-019-00690-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7142207PMC
April 2020

Pharmacological inhibition of mTOR attenuates replicative cell senescence and improves cellular function via regulating the STAT3-PIM1 axis in human cardiac progenitor cells.

Exp Mol Med 2020 04 9;52(4):615-628. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Laboratory of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology, Department of Physiology, Medical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, 50612, Republic of Korea.

The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway efficiently regulates the energy state of cells and maintains tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of the mTOR pathway has been implicated in several human diseases. Rapamycin is a specific inhibitor of mTOR and pharmacological inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin promote cardiac cell generation from the differentiation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells. These studies strongly implicate a role of sustained mTOR activity in the differentiating functions of embryonic stem cells; however, they do not directly address the required effect for sustained mTOR activity in human cardiac progenitor cells. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of mTOR inhibition by rapamycin on the cellular function of human cardiac progenitor cells and discovered that treatment with rapamycin markedly attenuated replicative cell senescence in human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) and promoted their cellular functions. Furthermore, rapamycin not only inhibited mTOR signaling but also influenced signaling pathways, including STAT3 and PIM1, in hCPCs. Therefore, these data reveal a crucial function for rapamycin in senescent hCPCs and provide clinical strategies based on chronic mTOR activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s12276-020-0374-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7210934PMC
April 2020

Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Probiotic KU15149 Derived from Korean Homemade Diced-Radish Kimchi.

J Microbiol Biotechnol 2020 Apr;30(4):591-598

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea.

KU15149 was demonstrated to have probiotic behavior and functions, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. KU15149 obtained from homemade diced-radish kimchi has a high survival rate under artificial gastric acid (pH 2.5, 0.3% pepsin) and bile salt (0.3% oxgall) conditions. However, KU15149 did not produce β-glucuronidase, which is known to be a carcinogenic enzyme with resistance to several antibiotics, such as gentamycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. KU15149 strongly adhered to HT-29 cells and had high antioxidant activity in terms of 2,2-diphenyl- 1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging and β-carotene bleaching assays. KU15149 also exhibited a pronounced inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production, along with expression of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase -2 (COX-2) as well as proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, when RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with LPS. Therefore, KU15149 exhibited pharmaceutical functionality as a potential probiotic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4014/jmb.2002.02052DOI Listing
April 2020

Immune-stimulating Effect of Ln1 Isolated from the Traditional Korean Fermented Food, Kimchi.

J Microbiol Biotechnol 2020 Jun;30(6):926-929

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea.

This study aimed to determine the immune-stimulating effects of heat-killed Ln1 (HK-Ln1) through the production of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokine achieved by inducing NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-signaling pathways in macrophages. HK-Ln1 showed higher NO and cytokine production compared t°Control (nonstimulated lipopolysaccharide); in addition, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was induced through HK-Ln1treatment. The phosphorylation of IκB-α and p65 increased following treatment by HK-Ln1, which implicates IκB-α degradation and the translocation of p65 to nucleus. In addition, the phosphorylation of MAPKs, ERK 1/2, JNK, and p38 was induced following HK-Ln1 treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4014/jmb.2001.01038DOI Listing
June 2020

Predictive model of growth kinetics for Staphylococcus aureus in raw beef under various packaging systems.

Meat Sci 2020 Jul 9;165:108108. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

This study describes a model of the growth kinetics for S. aureus in raw beef under wrapped packaging (WP), modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), vacuum packaging (VP), and vacuum skin packaging (VSP). Beef samples were inoculated with S. aureus and stored at 10, 15, 20, and 25 °C. VP and VSP showed lower maximum bacteria counts and higher lag time than WP and MAP at all temperatures. At 10 °C, S. aureus in VP and VSP decreased to about 2.5 Log CFU/g. Two primary models (modified Gompertz model and reparameterized Gompertz survival model) were used in the study. The secondary models were described using a polynomial equation and the Davey model. The bias factor (Bf), accuracy factor (Af), and root mean square error (RMSE) of the secondary models were 0.91-1.09, 1.00-1.13, and 0.00-0.68, respectively. The predictive models for kinetics of S. aureus in various packaged raw beef could help to predict the fate of S. aureus more accurately.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2020.108108DOI Listing
July 2020

Probiotic Properties of KU200019 and Synergistic Activity with Fructooligosaccharides in Antagonistic Activity against Foodborne Pathogens.

Food Sci Anim Resour 2020 Mar 1;40(2):297-310. Epub 2020 Mar 1.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea.

This study aims to evaluate the probiotic properties of KU200019 and the synergistic activity with prebiotics on antimicrobial activity, and the potential application as an adjunct culture in fermented dairy products. The commercial strain, ATCC 14869 was used as reference strain. KU200019 was showed higher viability in simulated gastric (99.38±0.21%) and bile (115.10±0.13%) conditions compared to reference strain. KU200019 exhibited antimicrobial activity against various foodborne pathogens. The supplementation of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) enhanced viability of lactic acid bacteria (>8 Log CFU/mL) and antioxidant activity [2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical assay (DPPH) assay, 31.23±1.14%; 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) assay, 38.82±1.46%] in fermented skim milk during refrigerated storage. KU200019 was distinguished from the reference strain by its higher probiotic potential, antimicrobial activity, and higher antioxidant activity in fermented milk. Therefore, KU200019 with FOS was demonstrated promising properties for further application in fermented dairy products with enhanced safety and quality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5851/kosfa.2020.e15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7057033PMC
March 2020

Probiotic Properties and Neuroprotective Effects of KU200793 Isolated from Korean Fermented Foods.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Feb 12;21(4). Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the probiotic characteristics and neuroprotective effects of bacteria isolated from Korean fermented foods. Three bacterial strains ( KU200060, KU200171, and KU200793) showed potential probiotic properties, such as high tolerance against artificial gastric juice and bile salts, sensitivity to antibiotics, nonproduction of carcinogenic enzymes, and high adhesion to intestinal cells. Heat-killed KU200060 and KU200793 showed higher antioxidant activity than heat-killed KU200171. The conditioned medium (CM) was used to evaluate the reaction between HT-29 cells and each heat-killed strain. All CMs protected SH-SY5Y cells from 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP)-induced toxicity. The expression of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) mRNA in HT-29 cells treated with CM containing heat-killed KU200793 was the highest. The CM significantly reduced the Bax/Bcl ratio and increased BDNF mRNA expression in SH-SY5Y cells treated with MPP. These results indicate that KU200793 can be used as a prophylactic functional food, having probiotic potential and neuroprotective effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21041227DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072984PMC
February 2020

Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Association With Disability and Quality of Life.

Clin Spine Surg 2020 05;33(4):E185-E190

Spine Center and Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital.

Study Design: This was a cross-sectional cohort study.

Objective: The objective of this study was to identify the prevalence of sleep disturbance in patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to establish the relationship between sleep disturbance and both functional disability and health-related quality of life in patients with symptomatic LSS.

Summary Of Background Data: Despite the possible association between LSS and poor sleep quality, there has been no study regarding the relationship between LSS and sleep disturbance.

Materials And Methods: A total of 148 patients with LSS were divided into the poor sleeper and nonpoor sleeper groups according to Global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score. Demographic data, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and EuroQol 5-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) were compared between both groups. Multiple regression analysis was performed with ODI or ODI without sleep component as the dependent variable and age, sex, PSQI, VAS for back pain, VAS for leg pain as independent variables.

Results: Of the 148 patients who participated in this study, 54 (36.5%) and 94 (63.5%) patients were classified into nonpoor sleeper and poor sleeper groups. Although there were no differences in demographic data or VAS for back or leg pain between the nonpoor sleeper and poor sleeper groups, poor sleepers demonstrated significantly higher ODI scores, and lower EQ-5D than nonpoor sleepers (P=0.003 and 0.004, respectively). There were significant correlations between the global PSQI score and both the ODI score and EQ-5D. Although the surgical treatment group showed significantly higher VAS for back pain, VAS for leg pain, ODI scores, and lower EQ-5D than the conservative treatment group, the ratio of poor to nonpoor sleepers was not different between both groups (P=0.733). In the surgical treatment group, the percent of poor sleeper decreased from 65.1% to 47.6% 6 months after surgery (P<0.001).

Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that 'poor sleep quality' is a prevalent condition (63.5%) in patients with symptomatic LSS. Poor sleep quality has an adverse effect on functional disability and health-related quality of life in symptomatic LSS patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BSD.0000000000000944DOI Listing
May 2020

Investigating the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of cinnamaldehyde against Campylobacter spp. using cell surface characteristics.

J Food Sci 2020 Jan 7;85(1):157-164. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Dept. of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk Univ., Seoul, 143-701, Republic of Korea.

Campylobacter species are known as biofilm-forming bacteria in food systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of cinnamaldehyde against Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from chicken meat. The biofilm-forming C. jejuni and C. coli strains from chicken meat were investigated using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and Campylobacter spp. characteristics. The MIC value was 31.25 µg/mL for the Campylobacter strains tested. Cinnamaldehyde had an inhibition and degradation effect on Campylobacter biofilms at concentrations > 15.63 µg/mL. Campylobacter strains treated with 15.63 µg/mL CA exhibited significantly decreased autoaggregation, motility, exopolysaccharide production, and soluble protein. In addition, Campylobacter biofilms formed on stainless steel were degraded following cinnamaldehyde treatment, as determined by scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that cinnamaldehyde constitutes a potential natural preservative against Campylobacter and a nontoxic biofilm remover that could be applied to control food poisoning in the poultry manufacturing-related food industry. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Cinnamaldehyde was able to effectively remove the biofilm of Campylobacter in the small crack of stainless steel. Cinnamaldehyde has a potential to replace the synthetic antimicrobial and/or antibiofilm agent as well as has a positive influence on consumer concern for the food safety issues of the poultry industries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.14989DOI Listing
January 2020

Probiotic characterization of KU15153 showing antimicrobial and antioxidant effect isolated from kimchi.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2019 Oct 4;28(5):1521-1528. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029 Republic of Korea.

KU15153 was isolated from kimchi and probiotic characterization was performed including analysis of its antimicrobial and antioxidant effects. GG (LGG) was used as a probiotic control. KU15153 survived under artificial gastric conditions and was non-hemolytic, showed antibiotic susceptibility, and did not produce carcinogenic β-glucuronidase. KU15153 adhered strongly to HT-29 cells in the direct adherent assay and showed high cell surface hydrophobicity. Particularly, KU15153 showed antimicrobial activity against the food-borne pathogens ATCC 25922, ATCC 15313, Typhimurium P99, and KCCM 11335. Antioxidant activity was assessed using the DPPH radical scavenging assay and β-carotene and linoleic acid inhibition assay. KU15153 showed higher antioxidant activity than LGG. These results suggest that KU15153 has potential for use as a probiotic organism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-019-00576-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6811472PMC
October 2019

strains as human probiotics: characterization, safety, microbiome, and probiotic carrier.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2019 Oct 8;28(5):1297-1305. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

1Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resource, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029 Republic of Korea.

Both spore and vegetative forms of species have been used as probiotics, and they have high stability to the surrounding atmospheric conditions such as heat, gastric conditions, and moisture. The commercial probiotic strains in use are , , , , , , and . These strains have antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, and vitamin production properties. However, probiotics can also produce toxins and biogenic amines and transfer antibiotic resistance genes; therefore, their safety is a concern. Studies on the microbiome using probiotic strains are limited in humans. Most microbiome research has been conducted in chicken, mouse, and pig. Some probiotics are used as fermentation starters in plant and soybean and dietary supplement of baking foods as a probiotic carrier. This review summarizes the characterization of species as probiotics for human use and their safety, microbiome, and probiotic carrier.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-019-00691-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6811671PMC
October 2019

Antibacterial Effect of a Mixed Natural Preservative against on Lettuce and Raw Pork Loin.

J Food Prot 2019 Nov;82(11):2001-2006

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea (ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9891-7703 [H.-D.P.]).

A mixed natural preservative, including grapefruit seed extract (GSE), cinnamaldehyde (CA), and nisin, was investigated for the reduction of growth on lettuce and raw pork loin. The MIC of each natural preservative was investigated for strains tested. Following central composite design, lettuce and pork loin were inoculated with a cocktail of three strains of (ATCC 15313, H7962, and NADC 2045 [Scott A]) and treated with the mixed natural preservative that included GSE (0.64 to 7.36 ppm), CA (1.6 to 18.4 ppm), and nisin (0.48 to 5.5 ppm). The MIC of GSE was 31.25 ppm in tested strains, and of CA was 500 and 1,000 ppm in ATCC 15313 and the other strains, respectively. The MIC of nisin was 250 ppm. The value of this model was more than 0.9, and the lack of fit was not significant. The mixed natural preservative showed a synergistic antimicrobial effect and reduced the growth of by 4 to 5 log CFU/g on lettuce. In addition, the reduction of on pork loin was 3 log CFU/g. The mixed natural preservative, which consisted of GSE (6 to 8 ppm), CA (15 to 20 ppm), and nisin (5 to 6 ppm), increased the antibacterial effect against . These results suggest that the use of the mixed natural preservative could reduce the economic cost of food preparation, and response surface methodology is considered effective when measuring synergy among antimicrobials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-19-026DOI Listing
November 2019

Short communication: Physicochemical features and microbial community of milk kefir using a potential probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae KU200284.

J Dairy Sci 2019 Dec 16;102(12):10845-10849. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea. Electronic address:

The aim of this study was to analyze the β-glucan contents, physicochemical features, and microbial communities in milk kefir prepared using Saccharomyces cerevisiae KU200284 isolated from cucumber jangajji, a fermented vegetable commonly eaten in Korean. Three types of milk kefir were manufactured, with (1) activated kefir grain, (2) activated kefir grain with commercial S. cerevisiae BOF, and (3) activated kefir grain with S. cerevisiae KU200284. β-Glucan contents of milk kefir using kefir grain and kefir grain with S. cerevisiae strains BOF and KU200284 were 8.29, 8.59, and 8.57%, respectively. The pH, titratable acidity, viscosity, Brix level, and alcohol contents of milk kefir using kefir grain with S. cerevisiae strains were acceptable compared with milk kefir using only kefir grain. In milk kefir produced using kefir grains and S. cerevisiae strains, 16S rRNA reads showed representative strains of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens (>72% relative abundance) and Acetobacter fabarum (>16% relative abundance). In particular, milk kefir using kefir grain with S. cerevisiae KU200284 had the highest relative abundance of L. kefiranofaciens. In addition, the internal transcribed sequence (ITS) rRNA reads in tested milk kefir showed representative strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus (>52% relative abundance) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (>16% relative abundance). In contrast, milk kefir using S. cerevisiae strains had higher relative abundance of S. cerevisiae (>37%). The β-glucan production, physicochemical properties, and microbial community profiling indicate that S. cerevisiae KU200284 could be used in functional dairy products as a starter culture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2019-16384DOI Listing
December 2019

Immunomodulatory Effects by KACC 91563 in Mouse Splenocytes and Macrophages.

J Microbiol Biotechnol 2019 Nov;29(11):1739-1744

Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyungnam University, Changwon 51767, Republic of Korea.

The present study evaluates the immunomodulatory effect of KACC 91563 in murine primary splenocytes and macrophages. KACC 91563 regulated Tand B-cell proliferation and inhibited the Th1 (IL-2, IFN-γ)/Th2 (IL-4, IL-10) cytokine imbalance and immune cytokine production. Moreover, immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were significantly lower after treatment with KACC 91563. These findings suggest that KACC 91563 could modulate the systemic immune system toward both IgE production and regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4014/jmb.1812.12002DOI Listing
November 2019
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