Publications by authors named "N V Kabaeva"

31 Publications

Effect of Storage Conditions on the Integrity of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Microvesicles.

Bull Exp Biol Med 2019 May 10;167(1):131-135. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

V. I. Kulakov National Medical Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Perinatology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.

We studied the effect of storage conditions on the safety of microvesicles produced by human multipotent umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells into the conditioned medium. It was found that microvesicles can be stored without serious degradation for up to 1 week at 4°С, but were almost completely destroyed during freezing and thawing cycles irrespective of the storage temperatures (-20°С, -70°С, or -196°С). Similar results were obtained for lyophilized medium conditioned by human multipotent umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells. Addition of a cryoprotectant (5-10% DMSO) followed by freezing and/or lyophilization preserved microvesicles at a nearly initial level. These findings indicate that during storage, microvesicles, being membrane structures, behave similar to living cells and require appropriate conditions for prolonged storage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10517-019-04476-2DOI Listing
May 2019

Comparative Analysis of Secretome of Human Umbilical Cord- and Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

Bull Exp Biol Med 2019 Feb 22;166(4):535-540. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

V. I. Kulakov National Medical Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Perinatology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.

Production of cytokines and growth factors by cultured human umbilical cord tissue- and bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells was measured by multiplex analysis. In most cases, the concentrations of bioactive factors in the culture medium conditioned by umbilical cord-derived cells was ten- to hundred-times higher than in the medium conditioned by bone marrow-derived cells. These results suggest that both multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells from the umbilical cord and cell-free products can have more pronounced therapeutic effect in comparison with mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from "adult" sources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10517-019-04388-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Microvesicles Express Surface Markers Identical to the Phenotype of Parental Cells.

Bull Exp Biol Med 2018 Nov 12;166(1):124-129. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

V. I. Kulakov National Medical Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Perinatology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.

Production of microvesicles in culture of human umbilical cord multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells was studied and comparative analysis of the expression of some surface molecules (clusters of differentiation, CD) was performed. It was found that the mesenchymal stromal cells produce microvesicles in the amount sufficient for their detection by flow cytometry. Parallel analysis of the phenotypes of maternal mesenchymal stromal cells and secreted microvesicles revealed identical expression of surface molecules CD13, CD29, CD44, CD54, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD106, and HLA-I. The concentration of microvesicles in the conditioned medium was 17.9±4.6×10/ml; i.e. one cell produced ~40-50 (44.7±11.5) microvesicles over 2 days in culture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10517-018-4300-xDOI Listing
November 2018

Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Support Viability of Umbilical Cord Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells but not the "Stemness" of Their Progeny in Co-Culture.

Bull Exp Biol Med 2017 Aug 29;163(4):523-527. Epub 2017 Aug 29.

V. I. Kulakov Research Center of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Perinatology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.

Cell-cell interactions and the ability of mesenchymal stromal cells to support the expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells were studied in co-culture of human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and nucleated umbilical cord blood cells. It was found that hematopoietic stem cells from the umbilical cord blood are capable to adhere to mesenchymal stromal cells and proliferate during 3-4 weeks in co-culture. However, despite the formation of hematopoietic foci and accumulation of CD34 and CD133 cells in the adherent cell fraction, the ability of newly generated blood cells to form colonies in semi-solid culture medium was appreciably reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells display a weak capability to support the "stemness" of hematopoietic stem cell progeny despite long-term maintenance of their viability and proliferation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10517-017-3843-6DOI Listing
August 2017

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Serum: Effective Substitute of Fetal Bovine Serum for Culturing of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

Bull Exp Biol Med 2017 Feb 27;162(4):528-533. Epub 2017 Feb 27.

V. I. Kulakov Research Center of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Perinatology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.

Optimal conditions for culturing of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the presence of pooled umbilical cord blood serum were determined. It was found that umbilical cord blood serum in a concentration range of 1-10% effectively supported high viability and proliferative activity of cells with unaltered phenotype and preserved multilineage differentiation capacity. The proposed approach allows avoiding the use of xenogenic animal sera for culturing of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells and creates prerequisites for designing and manufacturing safe cellular and/or acellular products for medical purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10517-017-3654-9DOI Listing
February 2017
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