Publications by authors named "N Tsilimparis"

202 Publications

The "Skewer Technique" for Stentgraft Delivery in the Aortic Arch: Advancing the dilatator in the innominate artery over a right femoro-brachial through-and-through wire.

Ann Vasc Surg 2021 Nov 19. Epub 2021 Nov 19.

Department of Vascular Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital, Munich, Germany. Electronic address:

Introduction: Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is the preferred treatment for different aortic pathologies, because it has reduced mortality and morbidity rates. However, TEVAR is not feasible in all cases due to aortic angulations, the hemodynamics of the aortic arch and narrow or tortuous iliofemoral access. Therefore, different adjuvant techniques, such as iliac percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, iliathrough-and-through guidewires and external transapical guidewires have been previously reported. Herein we describe the Skewer Technique for successful TEVAR delivery, through a right-brachial-femoral through-and-through guidewire and advancement of the delivery system into the innominate artery.

Case Report: A 38-year-old male presented with a symptomatic 11.5cm thoracic aneurysm with involvement of the left-subclavian artery ostium. The patient underwent left carotid-subclavian bypass and a TEVAR. Due to the huge size of the aneurysm a left-brachial-right femoral artery through-and-through guidewire was established. However, the achievement of a stable position for the deployment of the stentgraft was not possible. Eventually, the exclusion of the aneurysm was done with a right brachio-femoral through-and-through wire, inserting the proximal part of the delivery system into the innominate artery.

Conclusion: The use of adjuvant techniques such as a through-and-through right brachial-femoral guidewire with advancement of the endograft delivery system in the innominate artery (Skewer Technique) represents a useful alternative option in cases where the angulations of the aortic arch impede the deployment of the stent graft using conventional techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2021.10.058DOI Listing
November 2021

Non-Standard Management of Target Vessels With the Inner Branch Arch Endograft: A Single-Center Retrospective Study.

J Endovasc Ther 2021 Nov 15:15266028211058682. Epub 2021 Nov 15.

Department of Vascular Medicine, German Aortic Center Hamburg, University Heart Center of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate early and mid-term results of non-standard management of the supraaortic target vessels with the use of the inner branch arch endograft in a single high-volume center.

Material And Methods: A single-center retrospective study including all patients undergoing implantation of an inner branch arch endograft from December 2012 to March 2021, who presented a non-standard management of the supraaortic target vessels (any bypass other than a left carotid-subclavian or landing in a dissected target vessel). Technical success, mortality, reinterventions, endoleak (EL), and aortic remodeling at follow-up were analyzed.

Results: Twenty-four patients were included. In 17 (71%) cases, the non-standard management was related to innominate artery (IA) compromise (12 with IA dissection, 2 with short IA, 2 with short proximal aortic landing zone that required occlusion of IA, 1 with occluded IA after open arch repair). Two (8%) cases were related to an aberrant right subclavian artery (RSA), 1 patient (4%) due to the concomitant presence of a left vertebral artery (LVA) arising from the arch and an occluded left subclavian artery (LSA), and another patient presented with an occluded LSA distal to a dominant vertebral artery. Three (13%) cases were exclusively related to management in patients with genetic aortic syndromes. Twenty (83%) patients had a previous type A aortic dissection. Ten (42%) patients presented a thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm and 8 (33%) patients an arch aneurysm, 6 of them associated to false lumen (FL) perfusion. There were 2 (8%) perioperative minor strokes, and 1 patient with perioperative mortality. Seven patients presented an early type I endoleak, all resolved at follow-up. Seven patients required reinterventions during follow-up (7 reinterventions related to continuous false lumen perfusion, 3 related to Type Ia endoleak, 2 related to surgical bypass). All patients who presented with FL perfusion had complete FL thrombosis at follow-up. No patient presented aneurysm growth at follow-up.

Conclusions: The use of the inner branch arch endograft with a non-standard management of the supraaortic target vessels is a possible option. Despite a high reintervention rate, regression or stability of the aneurysmal diameter was achieved in all the patients with follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/15266028211058682DOI Listing
November 2021

Identifying risk factors for early neurological outcomes following thoracic endovascular aortic repair using the SUMMIT database.

Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2021 Nov 3. Epub 2021 Nov 3.

German Aortic Center, University Heart & Vascular Center, Hamburg, Germany.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess risk factors for early neurological complications following thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for multiple thoracic aortic diseases using an aggregated dataset.

Methods: The Study to Assess Outcomes After Endovascular Repair for Multiple Throacic Aortic Disease dataset included data from 6 studies evaluating Zenith thoracic endografts. Post hoc analysis identified early (30-day) neurological complications by TEVAR indication and corresponding risk factors.

Results: The study included 594 TEVAR patients (67% male; mean age 66 ± 15 years) with thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 329), ulcer (n = 56), acute (n = 126) or non-acute (n = 33) type B aortic dissection (TBAD) or blunt injury (n = 50). Overall early stroke rate was 3.5% (n = 21). Overall early paraplegia and paraparesis rates were 1.3% (n = 8) and 2.5% (n = 15), respectively. Multivariable analysis identified acute TBAD [versus others, odds ratio (OR) = 3.47, 95% confidence internal (CI): 1.41-8.52) and longer procedural time (OR = 1.33, CI: 1.02-1.73) as early stroke risk factors. Risk factors for paraplegia or paraparesis included more endografts deployed (OR = 2.43, CI: 1.30-4.55), older age (OR = 1.05, CI: 1.01-1.10) and higher preoperative serum creatinine (OR = 1.31, CI: 1.05-1.64). Endografts landing proximal to the left subclavian artery (LSA) increased stroke rate (versus distal to the LSA; 6.8% vs 2.3%, P = 0.014). Intraoperative LSA revascularization was performed in 20.9% of patients with endografts proximal to the LSA; revascularization did not significantly alter stroke rate (8.1% with revascularization vs 6.4% without, P = 0.72).

Conclusions: Acute TBAD and prolonged procedure time increased early stroke risk, while more endografts placed, age and preoperative renal impairment increased early paraplegia or paraparesis risk. For acute TBAD, endograft placement proximal to the LSA, but not LSA patency, increased stroke risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ejcts/ezab476DOI Listing
November 2021

One-Year Results of ZBIS Iliac Branch Device With an Off-Label Connection Limb.

J Endovasc Ther 2021 Oct 28:15266028211054760. Epub 2021 Oct 28.

Department of Vascular Medicine, German Aortic Center Hamburg, University Heart Center Hamburg, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to study 1-year results of Zenith branch iliac endovascular graft (ZBIS) with the off-label use of a 13 mm spiral Z limb to connect to the aortic main body.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective review from 2015 to 2019 of all iliac branch devices (IBDs) was performed at 1 institution that were connected to an aortic main body with a 13 mm spiral Z limb and had at least 1-year follow-up with computed tomography (CT). Primary endpoints are freedom from ZBIS separation from the connection limb, endoleak (EL), or reintervention at 1 year. Secondary endpoints are primary and secondary ZBIS patency, presence of any EL, and aortic reinterventions.

Results: Of 149 IBDs implanted in this period, 45 ZBIS in 35 patients were connected with a 13 mm limb and had a 1-year CT; 97% of patients had common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms, 7% of patients had hypogastric artery (HA) aneurysms, and 30% of patients had bilateral ZBIS implantation. Technical success was 98%. In 84% of cases, the Advanta V12 was used as the HA mating stent; 56% of patients had an EL, mostly type II, which resolved spontaneously in 70% at 1 year, and 9% of ZBIS required reinterventions at 1 year (2 for thrombosis, 2 for type Ic EL from HA mating stent). One-year ZBIS primary patency and secondary patency were 96% and 100%, respectively. No EL was noted to be related to the 13 mm connection limb. No migration or separation of the devices occurred.

Conclusions: The use of 13 mm spiral Z limb to connect a ZBIS with the main body in our series yields a high technical success rate and good 12-month outcomes without device separation or migration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/15266028211054760DOI Listing
October 2021

[Acute Complex Endovascular Aortic Repair - Off-the-shelf vs. Surgeon-modified Stent Grafts].

Zentralbl Chir 2021 Oct 19;146(5):521-527. Epub 2021 Oct 19.

Abteilung für Gefäßchirurgie, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Deutschland.

Introduction: Treatment of complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms is challenging. Open surgical repair is a high-risk operation, especially in emergency cases. Endovascular aneurysm repair with a patient-specific custom-made stent graft in patients with symptomatic or ruptured complex aortic aneurysms is not possible, due to the manufacturing time required. In such cases, alternative endovascular techniques can be used.

Results: The "off-the-shelf" and "surgeon-modified" stent grafts are valid options for the endovascular treatment of complex aneurysms in urgent and emergent patients. The former are standardised commercially manufactured fenestrated or branched stent grafts, which are available off-the-shelf with an anatomical feasibility in 50 - 80% of the patients. The "surgeon-modified" stent grafts refer to a technique, in which a commercially available stent graft is modified by the surgeon under sterile conditions directly before the implantation, in order to add the required fenestrations, scallops and/or branches. The modification takes approximately 60 - 120 min and haemodynamic stability of the patient is mandatory. Because of the off-label use of the commercial stent graft, detailed patient consent about the modification complications and risks should be performed whenever possible. A comparison of results on mortality and morbidity between "off-the-shelf" and "surgeon-modified" stent grafts has been published, although a direct comparison would be unfair for several reasons (different design, lack of extensive outcomes reports, long learning curve and different modification techniques).

Conclusion: The "surgeon-modified" and "off-the-shelf" fenestrated/branched stent grafts are used in the treatment of high-risk patients with symptomatic or contained ruptured complex aneurysms. The outcomes of the two techniques are good, although the long-term durability of the former should be further investigated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1647-3549DOI Listing
October 2021
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