Publications by authors named "N O Dmitrievskaia"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[Surgical treatment of a patient with traumatic rupture of the aortic arch and late oesophageal perforation].

Angiol Sosud Khir 2020 ;26(2):175-182

Department of Vascular Surgery, Municipal Multimodality Hospital #2, Saint Petersburg, Russia.

Described herein is a clinical case report regarding a patient presenting with traumatic rupture of the aortic isthmus with the development of a pseudoaneurysm occupying virtually the entire posterior mediastinum and measuring 20?10 cm in size. He was immediately treated as an emergency to undergo prosthetic reconstruction of the portion of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta by means of temporary bypass grafting with a synthetic graft in order to protect the visceral organs. The postoperative period was complicated by oesophageal perforation with the formation of an oesophago-paraprosthetic fistula, infection of the vascular graft, accompanied by the development of pleural empyema and mediastinitis. A second operative procedure was performed, consisting of subclavian-iliac bypass grafting on the right with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft measuring 20 mm in diameter, exclusion of the intrathoracic portion of the oesophagus, creation of a gastro- and oesophagostoma, retrieval of the vascular graft followed by suturing of the aorta, pleurectomy, decortication of the lung, and removal of the empyemic sac on the left. There was no evidence of ischaemia of the spinal cord or visceral arteries. One month postoperatively, he underwent a traumatological stage and 4 months thereafter plasty of the oesophagus with an isoperistaltic gastric pedicle, extirpation of the thoracic portion of the oesophagus, to be later on followed by closure of the oesophagostoma. The patient experienced no difficulties either while walking or during other physical activities, with the ankle-brachial index amounting to 0.9. With time, he developed difficult-to-correct pulmonary hypertension. Unfortunately, the patient eventually died of acute cardiopulmonary insufficiency 9 years after right-sided extra-anatomical subclavian-iliac bypass grafting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.33529/ANGIO2020219DOI Listing
September 2020

[Bypass grafting in patients with infected vascular grafts].

Angiol Sosud Khir 2020 ;26(1):148-156

Department of General Surgery, North-Western State Medical University named after I.M. Mechnikov, Saint Petersburg, Russia.

Analysed herein are the results of treating a total of 17 patients presenting with pathology of the aorta and lower-limb arteries, who from 2010 to 2018 required redo interventions due to infection of a previously implanted synthetic vascular graft. At admission, 3 patients were diagnosed as having an open infected wound, 11 were found to have a fistula, 2 had a false aneurysm in the area of the distal anastomosis of the branch of the bifurcation aortofemoral prosthesis, and 1 had thrombosis of the branch of the prosthesis with evidence of infection. As redo surgery, 4 patients underwent subclavian-femoral bypass grafting, 2 were subjected to crossover iliac-femoral bypass grafting, 8 to unilateral iliac-femoral bypass grafting, 3 to loop endarterectomy. In the majority of cases (14 of the 17) we used bypass grafting with creation of the tunnel through the muscular lacuna. Lethal outcomes were registered in 35% (n=6) of cases in the early postoperative period. Death was caused by acute renal failure in 6% (n=1), by acute mesenteric thrombosis in 12% (n=2), by gastrointestinal haemorrhage in 6% (n=1), and by multiple organ failure in 12% (n=2). Long-term mortality amounted to 33% (n=3) within 12 months. The main causes of death were increasing renal failure in 10% (n=1) and cardiovascular insufficiency on the background of heart diseases in 10% (n=1), as well as respiratory insufficiency in 10% (n=1). Reinfection in the remote period was diagnosed in 1 patient. A conclusion was drawn that bypass grafting is traumatic, however, it may be the only way to save the limb or patient's life in a complicated clinical situation. Using the superficial femoral vein as a shunt demonstrated good long-term results as to patency and resistance to surgical infection. Using a flap of the greater omentum, retroperitoneal fat, as well as wrapping of the prosthesis with a muscular flap ensured good tolerance of the zone of bypass grafting to reinfection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.33529/ANGIO2020120DOI Listing
September 2020