Publications by authors named "N J A van der Wee"

271 Publications

n. g., n. sp., a new monorchiid trematode from the eastern Australian coast and its life cycle partially elucidated.

J Helminthol 2021 Jun 8;95:e30. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD4072, Australia.

Of over 250 species of Monorchiidae Odhner, 1911, just four are known from gerreid fishes. Here, we report adult specimens of a new species infecting Gerres oyena (Forsskål) and Gerres subfasciatus Cuvier from off Heron Island and North Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia. The species is morphologically most similar to the concept of Lasiotocus Looss, 1907, which currently comprises eight species, in the possession of an unspined genital atrium, bipartite terminal organ, round oral sucker and unlobed ovary. However, phylogenetic analyses of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene region shows the species to be distantly related to the two sequenced species of Lasiotocus - Lasiotocus mulli (Stossich, 1883) Odhner, 1911 and Lasiotocus trachinoti Overstreet & Brown, 1970 - and that it clearly requires a distinct genus; thus, we propose Gerricola queenslandensis n. g., n. sp. Morphologically, G. queenslandensis n. g., n. sp. differs significantly from L. mulli and L. trachinoti only in the possession of distinctly longer caeca, which terminate in the post-testicular region, and in the absence of a distinct gap in the terminal organ spines. The remaining species of Lasiotocus possess caeca that also terminate in the post-testicular region, which might warrant their transfer to Gerricola n. g. However, doubt about their monophyly due to a combination of significant morphological variation, a lack of information on some features and infection of a wide range of hosts, lead us to retain these taxa as species of Lasiotocus until molecular sequence data are available to better inform their phylogenetic and taxonomic positions. Sporocysts and cercariae of G. queenslandensis n. g., n. sp. were found in a lucinid bivalve, Codakia paytenorum (Iredale), from Heron Island. Sexual adult and intramolluscan stages were genetically matched with the ITS2 ribosomal DNA and cox1 mitochondrial DNA regions. This is the second record of the Lucinidae as a first intermediate host for the Monorchiidae. Additionally, we report sporocysts and cercariae of another monorchiid infection in a tellinid bivalve, Jactellina clathrata (Deshayes), from Heron Island. Molecular sequence data for this species do not match any sequenced species and phylogenetic analyses do not suggest any generic position.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022149X21000213DOI Listing
June 2021

Genetic underpinnings of sociability in the general population.

Neuropsychopharmacology 2021 May 30. Epub 2021 May 30.

Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Levels of sociability are continuously distributed in the general population, and decreased sociability represents an early manifestation of several brain disorders. Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of sociability in the population. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of a sociability score based on four social functioning-related self-report questions from 342,461 adults in the UK Biobank. Subsequently we performed gene-wide and functional follow-up analyses. Robustness analyses were performed in the form of GWAS split-half validation analyses, as well as analyses excluding neuropsychiatric cases. Using genetic correlation analyses as well as polygenic risk score analyses we investigated genetic links of our sociability score to brain disorders and social behavior outcomes. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders, bipolar disorder, depression, and schizophrenia had a lower sociability score. The score was significantly heritable (SNP h of 6%). We identified 18 independent loci and 56 gene-wide significant genes, including genes like ARNTL, DRD2, and ELAVL2. Many associated variants are thought to have deleterious effects on gene products and our results were robust. The sociability score showed negative genetic correlations with autism spectrum, disorders, depression, schizophrenia, and two sociability-related traits-loneliness and social anxiety-but not with bipolar disorder or Alzheimer's disease. Polygenic risk scores of our sociability GWAS were associated with social behavior outcomes within individuals with bipolar disorder and with major depressive disorder. Variation in population sociability scores has a genetic component, which is relevant to several psychiatric disorders. Our findings provide clues towards biological pathways underlying sociability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41386-021-01044-zDOI Listing
May 2021

Fifteen years of NESDA Neuroimaging: An overview of results related to clinical profile and bio-social risk factors of major depressive disorder and common anxiety disorders.

J Affect Disord 2021 Jun 20;289:31-45. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Location VUMC and Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

The longitudinal Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) Neuroimaging study was set up in 2003 to investigate whether neuroanatomical and functional abnormalities during tasks of primary emotional processing, executive planning and memory formation, and intrinsic brain connectivity are i) shared by individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) and common anxiety disorders; and ii) characterized by symptomatology-specific abnormalities. Furthermore, questions related to individual variations in vulnerability for onset, comorbidity, and longitudinal course could be investigated. Between 2005 and 2007, 233 individuals fulfilling a diagnosis of MDD, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder and 68 healthy controls aging between 18 and 57 were invited from the NESDA main sample (n = 2981). An emotional faces processing task, an emotional word-encoding task, and an executive planning task were administered during 3T BOLD-fMRI acquisitions. In addition, resting state BOLD-fMRI was acquired and T1-weighted structural imaging was performed. All participants were invited to participate in the two-year and nine-year follow-up MRI measurement. Fifteen years of NESDA Neuroimaging demonstrated common morphological and neurocognitive abnormalities across individuals with depression and anxiety disorders. It however provided limited support for the idea of more extensive abnormalities in patients suffering from both depression and anxiety, despite their worse prognosis. Risk factors including childhood maltreatment and specific risk genes had an emotion processing modulating effect, apparently stronger than effects of diagnostic labels. Furthermore, brain imaging data, especially during emotion processing seemed valuable for predicting the long-term course of affective disorders, outperforming prediction based on clinical information alone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2021.04.009DOI Listing
June 2021

Fatigue in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neuropsychiatric symptoms is associated with anxiety and depression rather than inflammatory disease activity.

Lupus 2021 Jun 28;30(7):1124-1132. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Introduction: We aimed to investigate risk factors for fatigue in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric symptoms in order to identify potential interventional strategies.

Methods: Patients visiting the neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE) clinic of the Leiden University Medical Center between 2007-2019 were included. In a multidisciplinary consensus meeting, SLE patients were classified as having neuropsychiatric symptoms of inflammatory origin (inflammatory phenotype) or other origin (non-inflammatory phenotype). Fatigue was assessed with the SF-36 vitality domain (VT) since 2007 and the multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) since 2011. Patients with a score on the SF-36 VT ≥1 standard deviation (SD) away from the mean of age-related controls of the general population were classified as fatigued; patients ≥2 SD away were classified as extremely fatigued. Disease activity was measured using the SLE disease activity index-2000. The influence of the presence of an inflammatory phenotype, disease activity and symptoms of depression and anxiety as measured by the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was analyzed using multiple regression analyses corrected for age, sex and education.

Results: 348 out of 371 eligible patients filled in questionnaires and were included in this study . The majority was female (87%) and the mean age was 43 ± 14 years. 72 patients (21%) had neuropsychiatric symptoms of an inflammatory origin. Fatigue was present in 78% of all patients and extreme fatigue was present in 50% of patients with an inflammatory phenotype vs 46% in the non-inflammatory phenotype. Fatigue was similar in patients with an inflammatory phenotype compared to patients with a non-inflammatory phenotype on the SF-36 VT (β: 0.8 (95% CI -4.8; 6.1) and there was less fatigue in patients with an inflammatory phenotype on the MFI and VAS (β: -3.7 (95% CI: -6.9; -0.5) and β: -1.0 (95% CI -1.6; -0.3)). There was no association between disease activity and fatigue, but symptoms of anxiety and depression (HADS) associated strongly with all fatigue measurements.

Conclusion: This study suggests that intervention strategies to target fatigue in (NP)SLE patients may need to focus on symptoms of anxiety and depression rather than immunosuppressive treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/09612033211005014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8120630PMC
June 2021

Cortical thickness across the lifespan: Data from 17,075 healthy individuals aged 3-90 years.

Hum Brain Mapp 2021 Feb 17. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Laboratory of Psychiatric Neuroimaging, Departamento e Instituto de Psiquiatria, Hospital das Clinicas HCFMUSP, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Delineating the association of age and cortical thickness in healthy individuals is critical given the association of cortical thickness with cognition and behavior. Previous research has shown that robust estimates of the association between age and brain morphometry require large-scale studies. In response, we used cross-sectional data from 17,075 individuals aged 3-90 years from the Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium to infer age-related changes in cortical thickness. We used fractional polynomial (FP) regression to quantify the association between age and cortical thickness, and we computed normalized growth centiles using the parametric Lambda, Mu, and Sigma method. Interindividual variability was estimated using meta-analysis and one-way analysis of variance. For most regions, their highest cortical thickness value was observed in childhood. Age and cortical thickness showed a negative association; the slope was steeper up to the third decade of life and more gradual thereafter; notable exceptions to this general pattern were entorhinal, temporopolar, and anterior cingulate cortices. Interindividual variability was largest in temporal and frontal regions across the lifespan. Age and its FP combinations explained up to 59% variance in cortical thickness. These results may form the basis of further investigation on normative deviation in cortical thickness and its significance for behavioral and cognitive outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25364DOI Listing
February 2021