Publications by authors named "Myra Arcilla"

2 Publications

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Comprehensive models of human primary and metastatic colorectal tumors in immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice by chemokine targeting.

Nat Biotechnol 2015 Jun 25;33(6):656-60. Epub 2015 May 25.

Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA.

Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired subcutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt.3239DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4532544PMC
June 2015

A phase IIa randomized, double-blind trial of erlotinib in inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in aberrant crypt foci of the colorectum.

Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 2015 Mar 20;8(3):222-30. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York.

Colorectal cancer progresses through multiple distinct stages that are potentially amenable to chemopreventative intervention. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are efficacious in advanced tumors including colorectal cancer. There is significant evidence that EGFR also plays important roles in colorectal cancer initiation, and that EGFR inhibitors block tumorigenesis. We performed a double-blind randomized clinical trial to test whether the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib given for up to 30 days had an acceptable safety and efficacy profile to reduce EGFR signaling biomarkers in colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a subset of which progress to colorectal cancer, and normal rectal tissue. A total of 45 patients were randomized to one of three erlotinib doses (25, 50, and 100 mg) with randomization stratified by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use. There were no unanticipated adverse events with erlotinib therapy. Erlotinib was detected in both normal rectal mucosa and ACFs. Colorectal ACF phosphorylated ERK (pERK), phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR), and total EGFR signaling changes from baseline were modest and there was no dose response. Overall, this trial did not meet is primary efficacy endpoint. Colorectal EGFR signaling inhibition by erlotinib is therefore likely insufficient to merit further studies without additional prescreening stratification or potentially longer duration of use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-14-0148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4355051PMC
March 2015