Publications by authors named "Myan Bhoopalam"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Predictors of Academic Neurosurgical Career Trajectory among International Medical Graduates Training Within the United States.

Neurosurgery 2021 Jun 10. Epub 2021 Jun 10.

Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Background: Within the literature, there has been limited research tracking the career trajectories of international medical graduates (IMGs) following residency training.

Objective: To compare the characteristics of IMG and US medical school graduate (USMG) neurosurgeons holding academic positions in the United States and also analyze factors that influence IMG career trajectories following US-based residency training.

Methods: We collected data on 243 IMGs and 2506 USMGs who graduated from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited neurosurgery residency programs. We assessed for significant differences between cohorts, and a logistic regression model was used for the outcome of academic career trajectory.

Results: Among the 2749 neurosurgeons in our study, IMGs were more likely to pursue academic neurosurgery careers relative to USMGs (59.7% vs 51.1%; P = .011) and were also more likely to complete a research fellowship before beginning residency (odds ratio [OR] = 9.19; P < .0001). Among current US academic neurosurgeons, USMGs had significantly higher pre-residency h-indices relative to IMGs (1.23 vs 1.01; P < .0001) with no significant differences between cohorts when comparing h-indices during (USMG = 5.02, IMG = 4.80; P = .67) or after (USMG = 14.05, IMG = 13.90; P = .72) residency. Completion of a post-residency clinical fellowship was the only factor independently associated with an academic career trajectory among IMGs (OR = 1.73, P = .046).

Conclusion: Our study suggests that while IMGs begin their US residency training with different research backgrounds and achievements relative to USMG counterparts, they attain similar levels of academic productivity following residency. Furthermore, IMGs are more likely to pursue academic careers relative to USMGs. Our work may be useful for better understanding IMG career trajectories following US-based neurosurgery residency training.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/neuros/nyab194DOI Listing
June 2021

Neuroma of The Supraorbital Nerve Following Forehead Flap Reconstruction - Presentation and Surgical Management.

J Craniofac Surg 2021 Jun;32(4):1515-1516

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Abstract: Localized pain or headache from neuroma formation is a rare and challenging complication of forehead flap surgery. Here the authors present a patient who developed local pain and dysesthesia following iatrogenic injury to the left supraorbital nerve during forehead flap elevation. Following a diagnostic nerve block in clinic, surgical excision of the neuroma was performed through an upper blepharoplasty approach. The patient had immediate postoperative pain relief and remains pain free at fifteen-month follow-up. The authors describe etiology, workup, and surgical management of sensory nerve injury during forehead flap reconstruction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000007566DOI Listing
June 2021

Wound Induced Hair Neogenesis - A Novel Paradigm for Studying Regeneration and Aging.

Front Cell Dev Biol 2020 15;8:582346. Epub 2020 Oct 15.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.

Hair follicles are the signature dermal appendage of mammals. They can be thought of as mini-organs with defined polarity, distinct constituent cell types, dedicated neurovascular supply, and specific stem cell compartments. Strikingly, some mammals show a capacity for adult hair follicle regeneration in a phenomenon known as wound-induced hair neogenesis (WIHN). In WIHN functional hair follicles reemerge during healing of large cutaneous wounds, and they can be counted to provide an index of regeneration. While age-related decline in hair follicle number and cycling are widely appreciated in normal physiology, it is less clear whether hair follicle regeneration also diminishes with age. WIHN provides an extraordinary quantitative system to address questions of mammalian regeneration and aging. Here we review cellular and molecular underpinnings of WIHN, explore known age-related changes to these elements, and present unanswered questions for future exploration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2020.582346DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7593594PMC
October 2020

Tunable and Reversible Substrate Stiffness Reveals a Dynamic Mechanosensitivity of Cardiomyocytes.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2019 Jun 30;11(23):20603-20614. Epub 2019 May 30.

Department of Physics , Bryn Mawr College , Bryn Mawr , Pennsylvania 19010 , United States.

New directions in material applications have allowed for the fresh insight into the coordination of biophysical cues and regulators. Although the role of the mechanical microenvironment on cell responses and mechanics is often studied, most analyses only consider static environments and behavior, however, cells and tissues are themselves dynamic materials that adapt in myriad ways to alterations in their environment. Here, we introduce an approach, through the addition of magnetic inclusions into a soft poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer, to fabricate a substrate that can be stiffened nearly instantaneously in the presence of cells through the use of a magnetic gradient to investigate short-term cellular responses to dynamic stiffening or softening. This substrate allows us to observe time-dependent changes, such as spreading, stress fiber formation, Yes-associated protein translocation, and sarcomere organization. The identification of temporal dynamic changes on a short time scale suggests that this technology can be more broadly applied to study targeted mechanisms of diverse biologic processes, including cell division, differentiation, tissue repair, pathological adaptations, and cell-death pathways. Our method provides a unique in vitro platform for studying the dynamic cell behavior by better mimicking more complex and realistic microenvironments. This platform will be amenable to future studies aimed at elucidating the mechanisms underlying mechanical sensing and signaling that influence cellular behaviors and interactions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.9b02446DOI Listing
June 2019
-->