Publications by authors named "Mutsufusa Watanabe"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An autopsy case of corticobasal syndrome with pure diffuse Lewy Body Disease.

Neurocase 2021 Jun 15:1-7. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is associated with diverse pathological substrates such as tau, prion protein, transactive response and, rarely, alpha synuclein. We report the case of a54-year-old man, who presented with asymmetric levodopa-poor-responsive parkinsonism, frontal lobe signs and behavioral changes. He was diagnosed with CBS, and postmortem analyses revealed Lewy body disease Braak stage VI without comorbid pathologies. Retrospectively, the clinical course of our patient and previous reports indicate that CBS plus mood changes and autonomic dysfunction, including reduced uptake of metaiodobenzylguanidine, are predictive factors of Lewy body pathology, even if the clinical picture is atypical.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13554794.2021.1921220DOI Listing
June 2021

An adult nemaline myopathy patient with respiratory and heart failure harboring a novel variant.

eNeurologicalSci 2020 Dec 26;21:100268. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

Department of Internal Medicine, Tokyo, Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital, Japan.

Nemaline myopathy is a heterogeneous disorder of skeletal muscle, and histologically characterized by the presence of nemaline bodies in muscle fibers. Patients with typical congenital form of nemaline myopathy initially present with proximal but later also distal muscle weakness, mostly involving facial and respiratory muscle. Cardiac involvement has been rarely observed especially in nebulin-related nemaline myopathy and there have been only two reports about nebulin-related nemaline myopathy patients with cardiac involvement. We present here the case of a 65-year-old woman manifesting slowly progressive distal myopathy with respiratory and heart failure. She harbored two variants in the nebulin gene, c.20131C > T (p.Arg6711Trp) and c.674C > T (p.Pro225Leu), and one of them, c.674C > T, was a novel variant. In this report, we discuss the pathogenicity of the novel variant and its association with clinical phenotypes including cardiac involvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ensci.2020.100268DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7479285PMC
December 2020

Development of demyelinating lesions in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML): Comparison of magnetic resonance images and neuropathology of post-mortem brain.

Neuropathology 2019 Aug 2;39(4):294-306. Epub 2019 Jun 2.

Department of Internal Medicine, Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disorder caused by opportunistic infection of JC polyomavirus (JCV). Today, increased attention has been focused on PML development in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients under disease-modifying therapies (DMT). Although in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) era, PML was thought to be a rapidly progressive disease with poor prognosis, drug-associated PML is relatively slow in progress, and a favorable outcome may be expected with early diagnosis. However, early PML diagnosis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently difficult, and JCV DNA copy number in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is usually low. To facilitate early PML diagnosis on MRI, the pre-mortem images were compared with neuropathology of the post-mortem brain, and underlying pathology corresponding to the MRI findings was evaluated. As a result, PML lesions of the autopsied brain were divided into three parts, based on the disease extension patterns: (A) Progressive white matter lesion in the right frontoparietal lobe including the precentral gyrus. Huge demyelinated lesions were formed with fusions of numerous small lesions. (B) Central lesion including deep gray matters, such as the putamen and thalamus. The left thalamic lesion was contiguous with the pontine tegmentum. (C) Infratentorial lesion of brainstem and cerebellum. Demyelination in the pontine basilar region and in cerebellar white matter was contiguous via middle cerebellar peduncles (MCPs). In addition, (D) satellite lesions were scattered all over the brain. These observations indicate that PML lesions likely evolve with three steps in a tract-dependent manner: (1) initiation; (2) extension/expansion of demyelinating lesions; and (3) fusion. Understanding of the PML disease evolution patterns would enable confident early diagnosis on MRI, which is essential for favorable prognosis with good functional outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/neup.12562DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6852116PMC
August 2019

[A case of hemichorea associated with lung adenocarcinoma].

Rinsho Shinkeigaku 2018 Jul 30;58(7):430-434. Epub 2018 Jun 30.

Department of Neurology and Neurological Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University.

An 81-year-old woman admitted to our hospital due to involuntary movement on her right extremities. Laboratory tests, including autoantibodies, were unremarkable and only age related changes were observed on brain MRI. Chest CT revealed lung adenocarcinoma. She was diagnosed as having paraneoplastic chorea. After removal of the tumor, her chorea was dramatically improved. One year after the operation, abnormal high intensity lesions were seen in bilateral caudate nuclei and globus pallidus on MRI. A part of the left caudate nucleus was enhanced by gadolinium. Here we show a clinical picture and neuroradiological findings of paraneoplastic chorea associated with lung adenocarcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5692/clinicalneurol.cn-001128DOI Listing
July 2018

Clinical, biochemical and molecular investigation of adult-onset glutaric acidemia type II: Characteristics in comparison with pediatric cases.

Brain Dev 2016 Mar 26;38(3):293-301. Epub 2015 Sep 26.

Department of Pediatrics, Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Izumo, Shimane, Japan.

Introduction: An increasing number of adult patients have been diagnosed with fatty acid β-oxidation disorders with the rising use of diagnostic technologies. In this study, clinical, biochemical, and molecular characteristics of 2 Japanese patients with adult-onset glutaric acidemia type II (GA2) were investigated and compared with those of pediatric cases.

Methods: The patients were a 58-year-old male and a 31-year-old male. In both cases, episodes of myopathic symptoms, including myalgia, muscle weakness, and liver dysfunction of unknown cause, had been noted for the past several years. Muscle biopsy, urinary organic acid analysis (OA), acylcarnitine (AC) analysis in dried blood spots (DBS) and serum, immunoblotting, genetic analysis, and an in vitro probe acylcarnitine (IVP) assay were used for diagnosis and investigation.

Results: In both cases, there was no obvious abnormality of AC in DBS or urinary OA, although there was a increase in medium- and long-chain ACs in serum; also, fat deposits were observed in the muscle biopsy. Immunoblotting and gene analysis revealed that both patients had GA2 due to a defect in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH). The IVP assay indicated no special abnormalities in either case.

Conclusion: Late-onset GA2 is separated into the intermediate and myopathic forms. In the myopathic form, episodic muscular symptoms or liver dysfunction are primarily exhibited after later childhood. Muscle biopsy and serum (or plasma) AC analysis allow accurate diagnosis in contrast with other biochemical tests, such as analysis of AC in DBS, urinary OA, or the IVP assay, which show fewer abnormalities in the myopathic form compared to intermediate form.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2015.08.011DOI Listing
March 2016

Embolic stroke during apixaban therapy for left atrial appendage thrombus.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2015 Apr 22;24(4):e101-2. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

Department of Internal Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus is associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) and is a powerful predictor of cardiogenic thromboembolism. Warfarin is an established anticoagulant therapy for patients with LAA thrombus to prevent thromboembolic complications. Apixaban is superior to warfarin in the prevention of thromboembolic complications in patients with AF, and there are case reports showing apixaban-associated resolution of LAA thrombus; however, the efficacy and safety of apixaban for the treatment of LAA thrombus remains unproven. Here we report a patient who experienced embolic stroke while taking apixaban for the treatment of LAA thrombus. Thrombolysis therapy was initiated at the onset of stroke and the patient recovered remarkably. Apixaban is known to make thrombi mobile and/or fragile by shifting the coagulation/fibrinolysis balance to a relative predominance of fibrinolytic activity; therefore, it is necessary to monitor for thromboembolic complications after the initiation of apixaban for the treatment of pre-existing LAA thrombus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2014.11.031DOI Listing
April 2015

Ocular flutter, generalized myoclonus, and truncal ataxia in a patient with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

J Neurol 2013 Nov 17;260(11):2906-7. Epub 2013 Oct 17.

Department of Internal Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital, 4-23-15 Kohtohbashi, Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 130-8575, Japan,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-013-7146-1DOI Listing
November 2013

Intravenous t-PA for the occlusion of an accessory MCA.

Intern Med 2013 1;52(1):163. Epub 2013 Jan 1.

Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.52.8999DOI Listing
July 2013

[Villaret's syndrome caused by internal carotid artery dissection].

Rinsho Shinkeigaku 2011 Aug;51(8):608-11

Department of Internal Medicine, Bokutoh Metropolitan Hospital.

We report a patient with Villaret's syndrome (left hypoglossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, accessory nerve, and hypoglossal nerve palsies and left Horner's sign) caused by internal carotid artery dissection. He had neck pain on the left side, Horner's sign on the left side and paralysis of the left hypoglossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, accessory nerve, and hypoglossal nerve. Brain MRI revealed no signal from the left internal carotid artery and no brain infarction, although a tumor-like lesion was observed in the left internal carotid artery. Subsequent MRI studies revealed intramural hematoma in the left internal carotid artery, and on the basis of this finding, he was diagnosed with internal carotid artery dissection. He received anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy. His symptoms improved gradually. The symptoms of internal carotid artery dissection are neck pain, Horner's sign, brain infarction, and lower cranial nerve palsy. A characteristic feature in this case was that brain infarction was not observed. Only 3 similar cases have been reported in the past In all these cases, the patients had a good clinical course and showed complete recovery from the symptoms. Compared with western countries, in Japan, carotid artery dissection is rare. Carotid artery dissection should be considered as a differential diagnosis of lower cranial nerve palsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5692/clinicalneurol.51.608DOI Listing
August 2011

18F-FDG PET successfully detects spinal cord sarcoidosis.

J Neurol 2009 Nov 14;256(11):1943-6. Epub 2009 Aug 14.

Though there has been an array of methods to evaluate the extent of sarcoidosis, it is generally difficult to detect central nervous system involvement. Recently it has become accepted that 18F-FDG PET is more sensitive than gallium scintigraphy in finding sarcoid lesions, however its usefulness and limitations for detecting sarcoidosis in the central nervous system, especially in the spinal cord, has rarely been investigated. Two patients with pathologically confirmed sarcoidosis manifested spinal symptoms. We conducted 18F-FDG PET along with conventional imagings before and after treatment. Abnormal FDG uptakes which could not be detected by gallium scintigraphy were shown in the spinal cords in both patients. These abnormal uptakes were diminished in accordance with clinical improvement after treatment. Our findings suggest that 18F-FDG PET is effective in detecting and tracking the activity of spinal sarcoidosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-009-5270-8DOI Listing
November 2009

Developmental regulation of Ubc9 in the rat nervous system.

Acta Biochim Pol 2008 28;55(4):681-6. Epub 2008 Nov 28.

Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Tokyo, Japan.

The SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 is an essential enzyme in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) protein modification system. Although sumoylation, covalent modification of cellular proteins by SUMO, is considered to regulate various cellular processes, and many substrates for sumoylation have been identified recently, the regulation of Ubc9 expression has not been examined in detail. We analyzed the expression of Ubc9 during rat brain development at the mRNA and protein levels. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that expression of Ubc9 and SUMO-1 was developmentally regulated, while that of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH7 did not change so dramatically. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that the expression of Ubc9 was high in neuronal stem cells and moderate in differentiated neurons at embryonic stages. In the adult brain, moderate expression was observed in subsets of neurons, such as the dentate granular neurons and pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal formation and the large pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex. These results suggest that the Ubc9-SUMO system might participate in the proliferation and differentiation of neuronal cells in the developing brain and in neuronal plasticity in the adult brain.
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April 2009

Developmental regulation of rat Ubc13 and Uev1B genes in the nervous system.

Gene Expr Patterns 2007 Apr 8;7(5):614-9. Epub 2007 Jan 8.

Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, 11 Minamiooya, Machida-shi, Tokyo 194-8511, Japan.

Ubiquitin is a highly conserved protein in eukaryotes, and regulates diverse cellular processes. Lys-63-linked poly-ubiquitination has been recently identified to be involved in non-proteolytic processes such as DNA repair and cytokine-mediated signal transduction. Although, the heterodimeric enzymes Ubc13 and Uev are required for ubiquitination, their expressional regulation is not known. We have analyzed changes in their expression during brain development. Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of the two genes were very similar. Expression of both genes decreased gradually during the embryonic stages, then increased in the late postnatal period and was moderate in the adult. In situ hybridization analyses revealed that the expression patterns of the two genes were similar. Expression was observed in various regions in the embryonic brain but became restricted to specific regions after birth. In the adult, their expression was similar in regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and substantia nigra, but different in the cerebellum. These results suggest that Ubc13 may be closely associated with Uev1B.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.modgep.2006.12.006DOI Listing
April 2007