Publications by authors named "Murat Musluman"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Adding Expansile Duraplasty to Posterior Fossa Decompression May Restore Cervical Range of Motion in Grade 3 Chiari Malformation Type 1 Patients.

World Neurosurg 2017 Feb 2;98:98-103. Epub 2016 Nov 2.

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.

Background: Few studies have assessed the effect of Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) surgical decompression on cervical lordosis and range of motion (ROM). We aimed to assess the effect of expansile duraplasty on postoperative cervical mobility and spinal stability.

Materials And Methods: This was a single-center retrospective review of prospectively collected data. Patients were included if they underwent surgical treatment for symptomatic CM-1 between the years 1999 and 2009. Cervical ROM and lordosis were assessed before and after surgery in all patients. Collected data also included clinical improvement, as well as surgical complications after the procedure. Patients were divided into 2 groups. The first group underwent a posterior fossa bony decompression alone, while the second group additionally received an expansile duraplasty. Patients were further subdivided into 3 subgroups on the basis of the severity of tonsillar herniation.

Results: A total of 76 patients fit our selection criteria. Fifty-five patients belonged to the duraplasty group. Twenty-one patients underwent bony decompression alone. The 2 groups were statistically demographically and clinically similar. There was no difference in clinical outcome or in ROM and cervical lordosis between the groups except for patients with severe tonsillar herniation (CM-I grade 3). These patients had a statistically significant improvement in their postoperative cervical motility without compromising their spinal stability.

Conclusion: Adding an expansile duraplasty to craniovertebral decompression in CM-1 patients with severe tonsillar herniation may restore cervical ROM while preserving stability and alignment. This may relieve postoperative pain and improve clinical prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2016.10.127DOI Listing
February 2017

Reduction of lesion in injured rat spinal cord and partial functional recovery of motility after bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation.

Turk Neurosurg 2012 ;22(2):207-17

Kocaeli University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Stem Cell, Kocaeli, Turkey.

Aim: This study aimed to analyze the effect of rat bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs) delivery on lesion site after spinal cord injury, and to observe the functional recovery after transplantation.

Material And Methods: MSCs were isolated from rat femurs and tibias. The experimental rat population was divided into four groups: only laminectomy (1); laminectomy+trauma (2); laminectomy+trauma+PBS (3); laminectomy+trauma+MSCs (4). Their motility were scored regularly. After 4-weeks, rats were sacrificed, and their spinal cords were examined for GFP labeled rBM-MSCs by immunostainings.

Results: In the early posttraumatic period, the ultrastructures of spinal cord tissue were preserved in Group 4. The majority of cells forming the ependymal region around the central canal were found to be MSCs. The gray-and-white-matter around the ependymal region were composed of Nestin+/GFAP+ cells, with astrocytic-like appearance. The scores showed significant motor recovery in Group 4, especially in hind limb functions. However, no obvious change was observed in other groups.

Conclusion: The increase Nestin+/GFAP+ cells in the gray-and-white-matter around the ependymal region could indicate the potential to self-renew and plasticity. Thus, transplantation of rBM-MSCs might be an effective strategy to improve functional recovery following spinal cord trauma. In conclusion, molecular factors in cell fate decisions could be manipulated to enhance reparative potential of cell-based therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.5412-11.1DOI Listing
July 2012

Comparison of effectiveness of facet joint injection and radiofrequency denervation in chronic low back pain.

Turk Neurosurg 2012 ;22(2):200-6

Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul, Turkey.

Aim: The study was conducted to compare the clinical effectiveness of FJ injections (FJI) and FJ radiofrequency (FJRF) denervation in patients with chronic low back pain.

Material And Methods: This study included 100 patients; 50 in FJI 50 in FJRF group. VNS, NASS and EQ-5D were used to evaluate the outcomes. All outcome assessments were performed at baseline, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months.

Results: FJI in early post-op but FJRF in 1st, 6th and 12th month VNS showed better results (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the 1st (p=1) and 6th month (p=0.13) but in 12th month (p=0.04) in NASS. Increase in level number showed positive effect in NASS in FJRF group (p=0.018) but no effect in FJI group (p=0.823) in the 12th month follow-up. There was no significant difference with respect to 1st month (p=0.17), 6th month (p=0.22) and 12th month (p=0.11) post-procedure follow-ups in EQ-5D. At the short term FJI was more effective than FJRF however in midterm follow-up FJRF had more satisfying results than FJRF.

Conclusion: To our knowledge, the first choice should be the FJI and if pain reoccurs after a period of time or injection is not effective, RF procedure should be used for the treatment of chronic lumbar pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.5207-11.1DOI Listing
July 2012

Transforaminal epidural steroid injection via a preganglionic approach for the treatment of lumbar radicular pain.

Turk Neurosurg 2012 ;22(2):183-8

Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul, Turkey.

Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) for lumbar radiculopathy with respect to effect of injection levels, gender, and age group.

Material And Methods: Hundred-fifty-three consecutive patients who underwent to lumbar TFESI were enrolled. The outcomes were measured by using a visual numeric scale (VNS), NASS and EQ-5D. The relationship between possible outcome predictors and the therapeutic effect were evaluated.

Results: All the patients completed the 2nd year follow-up visits. Significant differences were observed between the pre-procedure and post-procedure VNSs, NASS patients' satisfactions scores and EQ-5D (P < 0.01) except 1st and 2nd year follow-up (P=0.12, P=0.27and P=0.19 respectively). Gender (higher in female patients) showed significant effect to pre-procedure VNS (P=0.04). An increase in the level number was significantly associated with an increase in the 6th month (P=0.005, P=0.004 respectively) and the 1st year (P=0.05, P=0.029 respectively) NASS and EQ-5D. No complication was occurred except discitis in two chronic renal failure patients.

Conclusion: Especially in the patients with severe co-morbidities TFESI is an option to provide higher life quality. The clinical course of the success of the TFESI decreases in one year and becomes stable thereafter. In the patients with immune deficiency, the practitioners should always be aware for an infectious complication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.5151-11.3DOI Listing
July 2012

Trigeminal ganglion neuron density and regulation of anterior choroid artery vasospasm: In a rabbit model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Surg Neurol Int 2011 15;2:77. Epub 2011 Jun 15.

Department of Neurosurgery, Sisli Research and Education Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with severe vasospasm caused by a variety of neurochemical mechanisms. The anterior choroid arteries (AChAs) are innervated by vasodilated fibers of the trigeminal ganglion (TGG). The goal of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the neuron density of the TGG and the severity of AChAs vasospasm with SAH.

Methods: Thirty-two rabbits were used for the study; eight served as the baseline control group, seven as a SHAM group, with injections of 1 cc of isotonic saline solution, and 17 rabbits were included in the experimental SAH group, with injection of homologous blood into the cisterna magna. After 10 days, the histopathology of the AChAs and TGGs were examined. The AChAs vasospasm index (VSI) of the external/internal diameter and the neuron density of the ophthalmic root of the TGGs were evaluated stereologically. The AChAs VSI was preferred -- a measure of the degree of vasospasm. As the VSI increased, the degree of arterial vasospasm increased. The results were statistically analyzed.

Results: The mean AChAs VSI was significantly higher and the mean neuronal density of the ophthalmic root of the TGG was significantly lower in the group with severe vasospasm associated with SAH compared to the controls, SHAM, and the group with mild vasospasm associated with SAH (P< 0.05). The ophthalmic root of the TGG neuron density in the 7 rabbits that developed severe vasospasm was statistically less than that observed in the 10 rabbits with mild vasospasm. There was a linear relationship between the low neuronal density in the ophthalmic root of the TGG and the severity of the AChA vasospasm.

Conclusions: The trigeminal ganglion neuron density may be an important factor in the regulation of AChAs diameter and cerebral blood flow. Low neuron density of the ophthalmic root of the TGG may play a role in the pathogenesis of AChAs vasospasm associated with SAH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.82084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3130438PMC
November 2011

Role of degenerated neuron density of dorsal root ganglion on anterior spinal artery vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage: experimental study.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2010 Dec 12;152(12):2167-72. Epub 2010 Sep 12.

Department of Neurosurgery, Rize University, Turkey.

Background: The spinal arteries are innervated by several systems that contribute to the control of spinal cord blood flow. The sensory fibers of upper cervical nerves have vasodilatatory effect on the anterior spinal arteries (ASA). Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes severe vasospasm by various neurochemical mechanisms. We examined whether there is a relationship between the neuron density of the C3 dorsal root ganglion and the severity of ASA vasospasm in SAH.

Methods: This study was conducted on 20 rabbits. Four of them were used as baseline group. Experimental SAH has been applied to all of 16 animals by injecting homologous blood into cisterna magna. After 20 days of injection, ASA and C3 dorsal root ganglia (C3DRG) were examined histopathologically. ASA volume values and normal and degenerated neuron densities of C3DRG were estimated stereologically and the results were analyzed statistically.

Results: The mean ASA volume was 1.050±0.450 mm³, [corrected] and the mean neuronal density of C3DRG was 10,500 ± 850 in all animals. The mean volume value of ASA was 0.970±0.150 [corrected] mm³, and the normal neuron density of C3DRG fell to 8,600 ± 400/mm³ in slight vasospasm group. In severe vasospasm-developed animals, mean volume value of ASA was 0.540±0.90 [corrected]mm³ and the normal neuron density of C3DRG fell to 5,500 ± 360/mm³. An inverse relationship between the degenerated neuronal density of the C3DRG and ASA volume values may indicate the severity of ASA vasospasm.

Conclusion: The neuron density of C3DRG may be an important factor on the regulation of ASA volume values and the continuation of spinal cord blood flow. Low neuron density of C3DRG may be considered as an important factor in the pathogenesis of severe ASA vasospasm in SAH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-010-0793-4DOI Listing
December 2010

Primary osteolytic intraosseous meningioma of the frontal bone.

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2010 Jul-Aug;44(4):415-8

Department of Neurosurgery, Sişli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Sişli, Istanbul 34077, Turkey.

Almost 1-2% of meningiomas are lesions described as ectopic or extradural meningiomas. Primary intraosseous meningiomas are a rare form of intra-bone tumours that account for approximately 67% of extradural meningiomas. A 41-year-old male patient presented with a headache and a bulge at the right frontal region. Cranial computed tomography displayed a hyperostotic lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging showed enhancement of the bone lesion after injection of gadolinium. A burr hole was drilled at the thickest section of the lesion, and pathological examination of the bone dust extracted from this site was performed. The pathological study indicated the presence of a meningioma. Right frontal craniectomy was performed and the hyperostotic bone was resected. No invasion was observed at the dura. A calvarial defect was reconstructed during the same session with methyl methacrylate cranioplasty.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0028-3843(14)60302-9DOI Listing
November 2010

Linezolid treatment of shunt-related cerebrospinal fluid infections in children.

J Neurosurg Pediatr 2010 May;5(5):443-8

Department of Neurosurgery, Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Object: The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria as a cause of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt infection is a disconcerting phenomenon that often requires the use of alternative antimicrobial agents due to resistance against commonly used medications. Linezolid, a member of a new class of antimicrobial agents, has good activity against virtually all important gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant gram-positive pathogens. The object of this article is to report a single-center experience with linezolid treatment in 6 young patients with VP shunt infections caused by drug-resistant strains.

Methods: The authors reviewed the records of 6 pediatric patients who developed VP shunt infection and in whom initial antimicrobial treatment regimens, including vancomycin, either failed or were associated with vancomycin-resistant enterococcus. All 6 patients were treated at their hospital between July 1, 2008, and June 29, 2009. The patients' demographic and clinical characteristics, underlying diseases, clinical manifestations, laboratory results, and various treatment modalities used before linezolid therapy were evaluated.

Results: The 6 patients included were 2 boys and 4 girls with a mean (+/- SD) age of 11.83 +/- 12 months (range 4-36 months). Five patients had acquired an infection within 4 months (mean 7.50 +/- 13.51 months, range 1-35 months) after shunt insertion. Four patients were treated with external ventricular drainage. Two patients' parents refused to allow shunt removal and placement of an external ventricular drain. The CSF was clear of bacterial growth within a mean of 3.67 +/- 1.36 days (range 2-6 days) after initiation of linezolid treatment. The mean duration of linezolid treatment was 18.17 +/- 3.31 days (range 14-21 days). Microbiological clearance of CSF and clinical cure were achieved in all patients. No laboratory or clinical side effects were observed during the treatment period. The mean length of hospital stay was 22.8 +/- 4.96 days (range 17-28 days).

Conclusions: Linezolid could be an appropriate treatment alternative in children with ventriculostomy-related CSF infections caused by drug-resistant strains, including cases in which shunt removal is not an option. Well-designed prospective studies providing additional information on linezolid levels in plasma and CSF are necessary to confirm the authors' observations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2009.12.PEDS09421DOI Listing
May 2010

Neurosurgery is a profession.

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2009 May-Jun;43(3):286-8

Research and Education Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Rize, Turkey.

At present, the rapid advances in neurosurgical knowledge and technology are putting increased pressure on neurosurgeons to process huge quantities of information, with requirements for continuous learning and updating knowledge and skills which are time-consuming but essential. All these changes to the venerated status quo of neurosurgical practice have created an environment that may have a negative impact on neurosurgical professional behaviour. As a result, it may be that neurosurgeons find it increasingly difficult to meet their responsibilities to patients. In these circumstances, reaffirming the fundamental and universal principles and values of neurosurgical professionalism, which remain ideals to be pursued by all neurosurgeons, becomes all the more important. This paper summarizes the definition, evolution, and practice of neurosurgical professionalism.
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September 2009

Imaging features of unusual intracranial cystic meningiomas.

Can Assoc Radiol J 2007 Apr;58(2):109-15

Department of Radiology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Edime, Turkey.

Objective: To describe the imaging features of unusual intracranial cystic meningiomas in infants and adults.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the magnetic resonance and computed tomography findings for 2 female patients and 3 male patients, ranging in age from 1 to 73 years (median 41 years), with histopathologically proven cystic meningioma.

Result: Although cystic meningiomas usually appear as solid and cystic masses, they may present as a mainly multicystic lesion. The wall of a cystic part of the meningioma may include both enhancing and unenhancing areas at imaging. The cystic portion of a meningioma is hypointense on diffusion-weighted images and markedly hyperintense on corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

Conclusion: Cystic meningiomas may vary in appearance at imaging. They can be very challenging when present in infants. Knowledge of imaging findings and awareness of variability in the differential diagnosis can help to avoid preoperative diagnostic pitfalls.
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April 2007