Publications by authors named "Muhammad Sameeullah"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Inducible expression of human papillomavirus-16 L1 capsomeres in the plastomes of Nicotiana tabacum: Transplastomic plants develop normal flowers and pollen.

Biotechnol Appl Biochem 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Human papillomavirus type-16 (HPV-16) is the major HPV type involved in causing cervical cancer among women. The disease burden is high in developing and underdeveloped countries. Previously, the constitutive expression of HPV-16 L1 protein led to male sterility in transplastomic tobacco plants. Here, the HPV-16 L1 gene was expressed in chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum under the control of an ethanol-inducible promoter, trans-activated by nucleus-derived signal peptide. Plants containing nuclear component were transformed with transformation vector pEXP-T7-L1 by biolistic gun. The transformation and homoplasmic status of transformed plants was verified by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blotting, respectively. Protein was induced by spraying 5% ethanol for 7 consecutive days. The correct folding of L1 protein was confirmed by antigen-capture ELISA using a conformation-specific antibody. The L1 protein accumulated up to 3 μg/g of fresh plant material. The L1 protein was further purified using affinity chromatography. All transplastomic plants developed normal flowers and produced viable seeds upon self-pollination. Pollens also showed completely normal structure under light microscope and scanning electron microscopy. These data confirm the use of the inducible expression as plant-safe approach for expressing transgenes in plants, especially those genes that cause detrimental effects on plant growth and morphology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bab.2136DOI Listing
March 2021

Genetic Diversity, Population Structure and Marker-Trait Association for 100-Seed Weight in International Safflower Panel Using SilicoDArT Marker Information.

Plants (Basel) 2020 May 21;9(5). Epub 2020 May 21.

Department of Field Crops, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Science, Bolu Abant Izzet Baysal University, 14030 Bolu, Turkey.

Safflower is an important oilseed crop mainly grown in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The aim of this study was to explore phenotypic and genetic diversity, population structure, and marker-trait association for 100-seed weight in 94 safflower accessions originating from 26 countries using silicoDArT markers. Analysis of variance revealed statistically significant genotypic effects ( < 0.01), while Turkey samples resulted in higher 100-seed weight compared to Pakistan samples. A Constellation plot divided the studied germplasm into two populations on the basis of their 100-seed weight. Various mean genetic diversity parameters including observed number of alleles (1.99), effective number of alleles (1.54), Shannon's information index (0.48), expected heterozygosity (0.32), and unbiased expected heterozygosity (0.32) for the entire population exhibited sufficient genetic diversity using 12232 silicoDArT markers. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that most of the variations (91%) in world safflower panel are due to differences within country groups. A model-based structure grouped the 94 safflower accessions into populations A, B, C and an admixture population upon membership coefficient. Neighbor joining analysis grouped the safflower accessions into two populations (A and B). Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) also clustered the safflower accessions on the basis of geographical origin. Three accessions; Egypt-5, Egypt-2, and India-2 revealed the highest genetic distance and hence might be recommended as candidate parental lines for safflower breeding programs. The mixed linear model i.e., the Q + K model, demonstrated that two DArTseq markers (DArT-45483051 and DArT-15672391) had significant association ( < 0.01) for 100-seed weight. We envisage that identified DArTseq markers associated with 100-seed weight will be helpful to develop high-yielding cultivars of safflower through marker-assisted breeding in the near future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/plants9050652DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7284372PMC
May 2020

Uncovering Phenotypic Diversity and DArTseq Marker Loci Associated with Antioxidant Activity in Common Bean.

Genes (Basel) 2019 12 28;11(1). Epub 2019 Dec 28.

Department of Field Crops, Faculty of Agricultural and Natural Science, Bolu Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu 14030, Turkey.

Antioxidants play an important role in animal and plant life owing to their involvement in complex metabolic and signaling mechanisms, hence uncovering the genetic basis associated with antioxidant activity is very important for the development of improved varieties. Here, a total of 182 common bean () landraces and six commercial cultivars collected from 19 provinces of Turkey were evaluated for seed antioxidant activity under four environments and two locations. Antioxidant activity was measured using ABTS radical scavenging capacity and mean antioxidant activity in common bean landraces was 20.03 µmol TE/g. Analysis of variance reflected that genotype by environment interaction was statistically non-significant and heritability analysis showed higher heritability of antioxidant activity. Variations in seed color were observed, and a higher antioxidant activity was present in seeds having colored seed as compared to those having white seeds. A negative correlation was found between white-colored seeds and antioxidant activity. A total of 7900 DArTseq markers were used to explore the population structure that grouped the studied germplasm into two sub-populations on the basis of their geographical origins and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity contents. Mean linkage disequilibrium (LD) was 54%, and mean LD decay was 1.15 Mb. Mixed linear model i.e., the Q + K model demonstrated that four DArTseq markers had significant association ( < 0.01) for antioxidant activity. Three of these markers were present on chromosome Pv07, while the fourth marker was located on chromosome Pv03. Among the identified markers, DArT-3369938 marker showed maximum (14.61%) variation. A total of four putative candidate genes were predicted from sequences reflecting homology to identified DArTseq markers. This is a pioneering study involving the identification of association for antioxidant activity in common bean seeds. We envisage that this study will be very helpful for global common bean breeding community in order to develop cultivars with higher antioxidant activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes11010036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7016922PMC
December 2019

Expression of ESAT-6 antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in broccoli: An edible plant.

Biotechnol Appl Biochem 2020 Jan 2;67(1):148-157. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major infectious diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of an effective and economical vaccine for controlling TB is essential especially for developing countries. Edible plants can serve as biofactories to produce vaccine antigens. In this study, 6 kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6) of M. tuberculosis was expressed in Brassica oleracea var. italica via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to facilitate oral delivery of antigen. ESAT-6 gene was cloned using Gateway® cloning strategy. Transformation and presence of transgene was confirmed through PCR. Expression level of transgene was calculated via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the maximum integrated transgene number was two. Maximum amount of total soluble fraction of ESAT-6 was evaluated by immunoblotting, estimated to accumulate up to 0.5% of total soluble protein. The recombinant ESAT-6 protein was further purified and detected using silver staining and Western blotting. ESAT-6 protein induced humoral immune response in mice immunized orally and subcutaneously. The expression of M. tuberculosis antigen in edible plants could aid in the development of cost-effective and oral delivery of an antigen-based subunit vaccine against TB. To the best our knowledge, it is the first report of expression of a vaccine antigen in broccoli.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bab.1867DOI Listing
January 2020

Suppressing photorespiration for the improvement in photosynthesis and crop yields: A review on the role of S-allantoin as a nitrogen source.

J Environ Manage 2019 May 11;237:644-651. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430070, China; Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Grain Industry, Yangtze University, Hubei, China. Electronic address:

Environmental variations resulting in biotic and abiotic stresses demand adaptive changes in the photosynthetic machinery. To cope with these challenges, plant scientists are constantly striving to enhance photosynthetic activity. The photorespiration pathway, which fixes O and releases CO in C plants, competes with photosynthesis. One method to increase yield would be to enhance photosynthesis by engineering the photorespiratory pathway. To date, three engineered photorespiratory pathways have been produced, of which two have been proven experimentally in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. These approaches might be helpful in enhancing crop resilience to future environmental challenges. In partially photorespiratory suppressed plants, it is hypothesized that a gene cluster may have formed between bacterial glycolate dehydrogenase (GDH), glyoxylate carboligase (GCL), and tartronic semi aldehyde (TSR) genes with Arabidopsis allantoin degradation genes like Arabidopsis allantoinase (AtALN) to utilize S-allantoin as a source of nitrogen. Observations of the use of allantoin as an exclusive source of nitrogen or energy by Arabidopsis and Escherichia coli led us to propose a genetic switch control model between nitrogen assimilation and energy producing pathways in partially photorespiratory suppressed plants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.02.082DOI Listing
May 2019

CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Immunity in Plants Against Pathogens.

Curr Issues Mol Biol 2018 7;26:55-64. Epub 2017 Sep 7.

Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey.

Global crop production is highly threatened due to pathogen invasion. The huge quantity of pesticides application, although harmful to the environment and human health, is carried out to prevent the crop losses worldwide, every year. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathogenicity and plant resistance against pathogen is important. The resistance against pathogens is regulated by three important phytohormones viz. salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET). Here we review possible role of CRISPR technology to understand the plant pathogenicity by mutating genes responsible for pathogen invasion or up-regulating the phytohormones genes or resistant genes. Thus hormone biosynthesis genes, receptor and feeding genes of pathogens could be important targets for modifications using CRISPR/Cas9 following multiplexing tool box strategy in order to edit multiple genes simultaneously to produce super plants. Here we put forward our idea thatthe genes would be either mutated in case of plant receptor protein targets of pathogens or up-regulation of resistant genes or hormone biosynthesis genes will be better choice for resistance against pathogens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21775/cimb.026.055DOI Listing
August 2018

An Overview of Cardenolides in Digitalis - More Than a Cardiotonic Compound.

Curr Pharm Des 2017 ;23(34):5104-5114

Abant Izzet Baysal University, Faculty of Agricultural and Natural Sciences, Department of Horticulture, 14030 Bolu, Turkey.

The genus Digitalis L. containing species, commonly known as the "foxglove", is the main source of cardenolides, which have various pharmacological properties effective against certain pathological conditions including myocardial infarction, arterial hypertension, cardiac dysfunction, angina, and hypertrophy. Togehter with a prime effect of controlling the heart rhythm, many workers demonstrated that lanatoside C and some other cardiac glycosides are effective in several cancer treatments such as prostate and breast cancers. Due to digoxigenin derivatives of cardenolides, which are mainly used for medicinal purposes, such as digoxigenin, D. lanata as a main source is of great interest for commercial scale production of cardenolides in Europe. Phytochemical studies on cardenolides, naturally occurring plant secondary metabolites, have mainly focused on the species of the genus Digitalis L., as the members of this family have a high level and diverse content of cardenolides. During the last few decades, plant tissue culture techniques have been optimised for many plant species including Digitalis, however, the production capacity of cardenolides somehow failed to reach a commercially desired extent. In this review paper, the genus Digitalis is evaluated in terms of its main botanical and physiological features, traditional uses, molecular genetics and metabolomics, cellular mechanism of action, medicinal uses, clinical pharmacology, drug interactions, therapy in the management of cardiovascular disorders, potential utility of therapy in extracardiac conditions, and toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1381612823666170825125426DOI Listing
April 2019

Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of Primed and Non-primed Rice Seedlings under Submergence Stress.

Front Plant Sci 2016 28;7:1125. Epub 2016 Jul 28.

National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory of Crop Ecophysiology and Farming System in the Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University Wuhan, China.

Submergence stress is a limiting factor for direct-seeded rice systems in rainfed lowlands and flood-prone areas of South and Southeast Asia. The present study demonstrated that submergence stress severely hampered the germination and seedling growth of rice, however, seed priming alleviated the detrimental effects of submergence stress. To elucidate the molecular basis of seed priming-induced submergence tolerance, transcriptome analyses were performed using 4-day-old primed (selenium-Se and salicylic acid-SA priming) and non-primed rice seedlings under submergence stress. Genomewide transcriptomic profiling identified 2371 and 2405 transcripts with Se- and SA-priming, respectively, that were differentially expressed in rice compared with non-priming treatment under submergence. Pathway and gene ontology term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in regulation of secondary metabolism, development, cell, transport, protein, and metal handling were over-represented after Se- or SA-priming. These coordinated factors might have enhanced the submergence tolerance and maintained the better germination and vigorous seedling growth of primed rice seedlings. It was also found that many genes involved in cellular and metabolic processes such as carbohydrate metabolism, cellular, and metabolic biosynthesis, nitrogen compound metabolic process, transcription, and response to oxidative stress were induced and overlapped in seed priming treatments, a finding which reveals the common mechanism of seed priming-induced submergence tolerance. Taken together, these results may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced responses to submergence tolerance in crop plants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2016.01125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4964843PMC
August 2016

Need of cost-effective vaccines in developing countries: What plant biotechnology can offer?

Springerplus 2016 22;5:65. Epub 2016 Jan 22.

Department of Applied Plant Sciences and Plant Biotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Konrad Lorenz Straße 24, 3430 Tulln an der Donau, Austria ; AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Straße 1, 1220 Vienna, Austria.

To treat current infectious diseases, different therapies are used that include drugs or vaccines or both. Currently, the world is facing an increasing problem of drug resistance from many pathogenic microorganisms. In majority of cases, when vaccines are used, formulations consist of live attenuated microorganisms. This poses an additional risk of infection in immunocompromised patients and people suffering from malnutrition in developing countries. Therefore, there is need to improve drug therapy as well as to develop next generation vaccines, in particular against infectious diseases with highest mortality rates. For patients in developing countries, costs related to treatments are one of the major hurdles to reduce the disease burden. In many cases, use of prophylactic vaccines can help to control the incidence of infectious diseases. In the present review, we describe some infectious diseases with high impact on health of people in low and middle income countries. We discuss the prospects of plants as alternative platform for the development of next-generation subunit vaccines that can be a cost-effective source for mass immunization of people in developing countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40064-016-1713-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4722051PMC
February 2016

Recent developments in therapeutic protein expression technologies in plants.

Biotechnol Lett 2015 Feb 18;37(2):265-79. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory of Crop Ecophysiology and Farming System in the Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, No. 1 Shizishan Street, Hongshan District, Wuhan, 430070, Hubei, China.

Infectious diseases and cancers are some of the commonest causes of deaths throughout the world. The previous two decades have witnessed a combined endeavor across various biological sciences to address this issue in novel ways. The advent of recombinant DNA technologies has provided the tools for producing recombinant proteins that can be used as therapeutic agents. A number of expression systems have been developed for the production of pharmaceutical products. Recently, advances have been made using plants as bioreactors to produce therapeutic proteins directed against infectious diseases and cancers. This review highlights the recent progress in therapeutic protein expression in plants (stable and transient), the factors affecting heterologous protein expression, vector systems and recent developments in existing technologies and steps towards the industrial production of plant-made vaccines, antibodies, and biopharmaceuticals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-014-1699-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7088338PMC
February 2015